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M.S. Balaji

Bio: M.S. Balaji is an academic researcher from The University of Nottingham Ningbo China. The author has contributed to research in topics: Customer satisfaction & Service (business). The author has an hindex of 28, co-authored 69 publications receiving 2435 citations. Previous affiliations of M.S. Balaji include University of Kuala Lumpur & University of Nottingham.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated the mediating role of environmental concern and environmental knowledge in the relationship between green skepticism and green purchase intentions in an emerging economy of Malaysia and found that green skepticism lowers customers' environmental knowledge and environmental concern, in turn adversely impacting their purchase intentions for green products.

231 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results of partial least square (PLS) structural equation modelling reveals that ease of use, superior functionality, aesthetic appeal and presence are key determinants of value co-creation for IoT retail technology.
Abstract: Internet of things (IoT) is a novel paradigm that aims to bridge the digital world with the real world. With the rapid advancements in Internet and communication technology, we are witnessing the dawn of a new era of the IoT in various industries. The retail industry is at the forefront in embracing the IoT, which is expected to change the way customers experience shopping. Drawing on the service-dominant logic, this study proposes that customer interaction with IoT retail technology results in value co-creation. Responses are collected from 289 users of IoT technology in the retail setting. Results of partial least square (PLS) structural equation modelling reveals that ease of use, superior functionality, aesthetic appeal and presence are key determinants of value co-creation for IoT retail technology. Results also show that value co-creation influences customers’ continuance intentions and word-of-mouth intentions. The findings of this study have key implications for retailers in delivering sup...

210 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the different coping mechanisms used by customers when they confront service failure and found that the coping mechanism used by the customers changes depending on the severity of the service failure.

199 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The results show that the perceived richness of online discussion forum has significant positive effect on student participation and interaction, and learning, when used along with traditional classroom lecture.
Abstract: The present study contributes to the understanding of the effectiveness of online discussion forum in student learning. A conceptual model based on ‘theory of online learning’ and ‘media richness theory’ was proposed and empirically tested. We extend the current understanding of media richness theory to suggest that use of multiple media can enrich the communication context and perceived learning. Hierarchical regression was applied to investigate the relationships between antecedent factors, interaction and perceived learning. The results show that the perceived richness of online discussion forum has significant positive effect on student participation and interaction, and learning, when used along with traditional classroom lecture. Implications of these findings are discussed as they provide important guidelines for management educators.

191 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the relationship between smart customer experience, customer satisfaction, perceived risk, behavioral intentions, word-of-mouth intentions, stickiness to retail store, shopping effectiveness, and consumer well-being.

190 citations


Cited by
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Posted Content
TL;DR: In this article, the authors introduce the concept of ''search'' where a buyer wanting to get a better price, is forced to question sellers, and deal with various aspects of finding the necessary information.
Abstract: The author systematically examines one of the important issues of information — establishing the market price. He introduces the concept of «search» — where a buyer wanting to get a better price, is forced to question sellers. The article deals with various aspects of finding the necessary information.

3,790 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study illustrates the state-of-the-art use of mediation analysis in the context of PLS-structural equation modeling (SEM) by challenging the conventional approach to mediation analysis and providing more accurate alternatives.
Abstract: Indirect or mediated effects constitute a type of relationship between constructs that often occurs in partial least squares (PLS) path modeling. Over the past few years, the methods for testing mediation have become more sophisticated. However, many researchers continue to use outdated methods to test mediating effects in PLS, which can lead to erroneous results. One reason for the use of outdated methods or even the lack of their use altogether is that no systematic tutorials on PLS exist that draw on the newest statistical findings. The paper aims to discuss these issues.,This study illustrates the state-of-the-art use of mediation analysis in the context of PLS-structural equation modeling (SEM).,This study facilitates the adoption of modern procedures in PLS-SEM by challenging the conventional approach to mediation analysis and providing more accurate alternatives. In addition, the authors propose a decision tree and classification of mediation effects.,The recommended approach offers a wide range of testing options (e.g. multiple mediators) that go beyond simple mediation analysis alternatives, helping researchers discuss their studies in a more accurate way.

1,146 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a model of the customer engagement cycle is presented, linking it to the marketing concept, market orientation, and relationship marketing, and a customer engagement matrix is developed.
Abstract: Purpose – The advent of the internet and in particular the interactive features of Web 2.0 in recent years have led to an explosion of interest in customer engagement. The opportunities presented by social media to help build close relationships with customers seem to have excited practitioners in a wide variety of industries worldwide. Academic scholarship on customer engagement, however, has lagged practice and its theoretical foundation is relatively underdeveloped and a better understanding of the concept is essential to develop strategies for customer engagement. This paper seeks to address some of these issues.Design/methodology/approach – The paper attempts to enhance understanding of customer engagement by examining practitioner views of customer engagement, linking it to the marketing concept, market orientation, and relationship marketing, modeling the customer engagement cycle, and developing a customer engagement matrix.Findings – The paper develops a model of the customer engagement cycle wit...

1,113 citations

01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: By J. Biggs and C. Tang, Maidenhead, England; Open University Press, 2007.
Abstract: by J. Biggs and C. Tang, Maidenhead, England, Open University Press, 2007, 360 pp., £29.99, ISBN-13: 978-0-335-22126-4

938 citations

01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: Heskett, Sasser, and Schlesinger as mentioned in this paper show how managers at American Express, Southwest Airlines, Banc One, Waste Management, USAA, MBNA, Intuit, British Airways, Taco Bell, Fairfield Inns, Ritz-Carlton Hotel, and the Merry Maids subsidiary of ServiceMaster employ a quantifiable set of relationships that directly link profit and growth to not only customer loyalty and satisfaction, but to employee loyalty, satisfaction, and productivity.
Abstract: Why are a select few service firms better at what they do - year in and year out - than their competitors? For most senior managers, the profusion of anecdotal "service excellence" books fails to address this key question. In this pathbreaking book, world-renowned Harvard Business School service firm experts James L. Heskett, W. Earl Sasser, Jr. and Leonard A. Schlesinger reveal that leading companies stay on top by managing the service profit chain. Based on five years of painstaking research, the authors show how managers at American Express, Southwest Airlines, Banc One, Waste Management, USAA, MBNA, Intuit, British Airways, Taco Bell, Fairfield Inns, Ritz-Carlton Hotel, and the Merry Maids subsidiary of ServiceMaster employ a quantifiable set of relationships that directly links profit and growth to not only customer loyalty and satisfaction, but to employee loyalty, satisfaction, and productivity. The strongest relationships the authors discovered are those between (1) profit and customer loyalty; (2) employee loyalty and customer loyalty; and (3) employee satisfaction and customer satisfaction. Moreover, these relationships are mutually reinforcing; that is, satisfied customers contribute to employee satisfaction and vice versa. Here, finally, is the foundation for a powerful strategic service vision, a model on which any manager can build more focused operations and marketing capabilities. For example, the authors demonstrate how, in Banc One's operating divisions, a direct relationship between customer loyalty measured by the "depth" of a relationship, the number of banking services a customer utilizes, and profitability led the bank to encourage existing customers to further extend the bank services they use. Taco Bell has found that their stores in the top quadrant of customer satisfaction ratings outperform their other stores on all measures. At American Express Travel Services, offices that ticket quickly and accurately are more profitable than those which don't. With hundreds of examples like these, the authors show how to manage the customer-employee "satisfaction mirror" and the customer value equation to achieve a "customer's eye view" of goods and services. They describe how companies in any service industry can (1) measure service profit chain relationships across operating units; (2) communicate the resulting self-appraisal; (3) develop a "balanced scorecard" of performance; (4) develop a recognitions and rewards system tied to established measures; (5) communicate results company-wide; (6) develop an internal "best practice" information exchange; and (7) improve overall service profit chain performance. What difference can service profit chain management make? A lot. Between 1986 and 1995, the common stock prices of the companies studied by the authors increased 147%, nearly twice as fast as the price of the stocks of their closest competitors. The proven success and high-yielding results from these high-achieving companies will make The Service Profit Chain required reading for senior, division, and business unit managers in all service companies, as well as for students of service management.

862 citations