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Author

Madeline Levine

Bio: Madeline Levine is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Holocaust. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 8 citations.
Topics: The Holocaust

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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: Gender studies in the field of Holocaust studies as discussed by the authors have emerged as a response to existing research and available sources within the wider field of women’s studies, and indeed women's studies.
Abstract: ‘The road to annihilation was marked by events that specifically affected men as men and women as women.’1 Yet, the subject of gender is a relative newcorner in the wider field of Holocaust studies.2 It is only in the last twenty years that this area has been explored. Before this time, the subject was barely touched for a number of reasons. First, the field of Holocaust studies itself was quite limited in its scope and development from the immediate post-war years until the 1960s and 1970s.3 Only as certain other issues and areas were researched did questions about women and the family come onto the agenda for research. Second, questions pertaining to gender simply were not asked. It took until the era of ‘second-wave feminism’ in the 1970s, with new developments and trends in historical awareness about the history of women and rendering them ‘visible’, for these issues to be raised. As a result of feminist scholarship, the concept of gender as an analytical tool developed. Third, the state of the available sources was not conducive to advancing research in this area. It took until the 1970s for a proliferation of survivors’ memoirs to appear, as well as collected testimonies, which became an important source for researchers in this field. Gender studies of the Holocaust, therefore, appeared only once the field had developed to a certain point. They emerged as a response to existing research and available sources within the wider field of Holocaust studies, and indeed women’s studies.

175 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored the function of Israeli narrative films' persistent, albeit marginal, portrayal of women as victims of sexual violence during the Holocaust and found that the marginalization of such women during the holocaust was beneficial.
Abstract: This article explores the function of Israeli narrative films’ persistent, albeit marginal, portrayal of women as victims of sexual violence during the Holocaust. While the marginalization of such ...

8 citations

01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: The authors in this paper attribute Murray's survival to three distinct categories; (1) Murray's geographical location and relationship to his hometown of Wierchomla, Poland (2) rare level of low anti-Semitic activity encountered and (3) a number of miscellaneous personal factors that included but are not limited to his diet, gender, age, psychological composition, family connections, agency, etc.
Abstract: Murray Goldfinger was thirteen years of age when he faced persecution and ultimate annihilation at the hands of the ruthless Nazi regime. As Germany invaded Poland in 1939, Murray was living uninterrupted from the conflict on the outskirts of southern Poland near the Czechoslovakian boarder. Murray’s unbelievable survivor story describes in detail essentially every aspect of the Holocaust; from his two year hideout, to his time in Auschwitz, his interaction with the notorious Dr. Mengele and his eventual liberation from Buchenwald. In the midst of such a horrific fate the probability of survival was microscopic, especially coming from a country such as Poland, where German pseudo-scientific racial classifications made Polish-Jewry the most vile creature imaginable. Nevertheless, Murray’s incredible Holocaust narrative openly defied the “final solution.” In defying the final solution, Murray illustrated unbelievable resiliency, human capacity to live and maintenance of integrity in a world filled with death, dishonor and coldness. The aim of this thesis was to attempt to explain the inexplicable, thus coming to some concrete rationale as to why Murray was able to persevere unlike so many unfortunate victims who perished. The findings of this research attribute Murray’s survival to three distinct categories; (1) Murray’s geographical location and relationship to his hometown of Wierchomla, Poland (2) rare level of low anti-Semitic activity encountered and (3) a number of miscellaneous personal factors that included but are not limited to his diet, gender, age, psychological composition, family connections, agency, etc... Holocaust survival in Poland depended on a wide range of factors some of which are congruent to Murray’s story and some of which are not. Murray’s Holocaust narrative

7 citations