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Mahmoud Hassanabadi

Bio: Mahmoud Hassanabadi is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 3 publications receiving 3 citations.

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Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, various theories about Ferdowsi's sources are classified in three groups with reference to their proponents, and then each of these theories is critically and briefly analysed.
Abstract: Mohl, an early editor and translator of the Shāhnāme, began the discussion on Ferdowsi’s sources in the Shāhnāme in 1878. From that time until now, it has been one of main issues of discussion among expertson the Shāhnāme and Iranian culture. One can find various theories on Ferdowsi’s sources in the numerous works and articles which are published ever so often. One of the latest works in this field is Kumiko Yamamoto’s book The Oral Background of Persian Epics: Storytelling and Poetry. In the present article, first, various theories about Ferdowsi’s sources are classified in three groups with reference to their proponents, and then each of these theories is critically and briefly analysed. After a detailed introduction to Kumiko Yamamoto’s work, it is evaluated in view of the different theories proposed for the sources of the Shāhnāme. The present author favours the theory of both oral and written sources in the genesis of the Shāhnāme, and, in light of this, some strengths as well as weaknesses of this work are discussed in this extended review.

2 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The Situation of Women in Sasanian Iran as discussed by the authors Reflections on the Story of Bahrām Gór and his Mistress, and their relationship with their Mistress are discussed.
Abstract: The Situation of Women in Sasanian Iran : Reflections on the Story of Bahrām Gōr and his Mistress

1 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, Magar is defined as "not+if" which literally means "not + if" and fulfils several syntacticand pragmatic functions which have shifted over the course of time.
Abstract: Morphologically, magar is made up of ma+agar, which literally means “not+if”. It fulfils several syntacticand pragmatic functions which have shifted over the course of time. This paper focuses on t ...

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TL;DR: Yamamoto and Yamamoto discuss how oral tradition inter-connects with Middle Eastern literature and present a Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures (BSIL).
Abstract: KUMIKO YAMAMOTO Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures, 26. Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2003. xxiv + 191 pp. ISBN 90 04 12587 6 The central argument of this book concerns how oral tradition intera...

16 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, the derivation of pronominal clitics in contemporary Western Iranian languages has been investigated and it is shown that some clitic in Western Iranian may derive from the OIr.
Abstract: This article attempts to account for the derivation of pronominal clitics in contemporary Western Iranian languages. It argues against the common assumption (detailed in Section I) that all clitics derive from the genitive/dative ones of Old Iranian and explores the alternative possibility that some clitics in Western Iranian languages may derive from the OIr. accusative forms, or may represent a general oblique form resulting from a coalescence of the OIr. gen./dat. and acc. clitics (Section II). A derivation from such a general oblique is specifically plausible for the plural clitics in those Western Ir. varieties (discussed in Section III) whose pl. clitics are not derived from the sg. ones. This implies a revision of a morphological isogloss which has posited a certain grouping of the Western Iranian languages on the basis of the distribution of two variants of the 3rd sg. clitic, and suggests a more complex picture (Section IV). Although they do not belong to the Western Iranian group, data from Avestan and Sogdian will be used to broaden the basis for comparison with contemporary Ir. languages. 1

16 citations

01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the image of the ancient Iranian prophet Zoroaster in the Shāhnāme based on a closed reading of the story about the Kaynian king Goshtāsp written by Daqiqi (and continued by Ferdowsi).
Abstract: This paper aims to examine the image of the ancient Iranian prophet Zoroaster in the Shāhnāme based on a closed reading of the story about the Kayānian king Goshtāsp written by Daqiqi (and continued by Ferdowsi). For this purpose it will discuss the thematic properties of the Dāstān-e Goshtāsp (Tale of Goshtāsp) in the light of Iranian historical and epic traditions. Given the religious subject matter of the advent of Zoroaster, my aim is also to explore whether Daqiqi’s account primarily has a religious orientation or is the manifestation of a more secular orientation which represents the taste of kings and nobles with an emphasis on heroic events. The question of the Zoroastrian orientation of Daqiqi’s narrative is especially interesting given that the Shāhnāme was commissioned by an Iranian Muslim monarch and primarily addressed an audience of Persian-speaking Muslims albeit conscious of their national heritage. Of specific interest in my presentation is Daqiqi’s handling of the Sistānian heroic tradition and its hostility to Zoroaster’s patron, and whether there are any important ideological differences between Daqiqi and Ferdowsi in this respect.

14 citations