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Manjit Singh Sidhu

Bio: Manjit Singh Sidhu is an academic researcher from Universiti Tenaga Nasional. The author has contributed to research in topics: Augmented reality & Engineering education. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 58 publications receiving 206 citations. Previous affiliations of Manjit Singh Sidhu include Multimedia University & IT University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors have systematically reviewed the selected literature on the application of RFID-IoT in supply chain management, and highlighted the highlighted insights and recommendations will hopefully lead to increased efforts toward developing RFIDIOT technologies.

34 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An effective conceptual courseware development model specifically for dyslexic children is proposed and five essential features are identified to support this model, namely, interaction, activities, background colour customization, directional text reading left-right identification, and detail instructions.
Abstract: Multimedia has affected many areas in education and benefited users, including disabled ones. In this paper the authors propose an effective conceptual courseware development model specifically for dyslexic children. Five essential features are identified to support this model, namely, interaction, activities, background colour customization, directional text reading left-right identification, and detail instructions. A prototype courseware based on the proposed model was developed and tested with a small sample of dyslexic children from selected schools in Malaysia. The evaluation showed positive results in terms of performance whereby 60% of the users showed improvement in their performance, 30% showed unchanged results and 10% displayed a decrease in performance.

26 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: This section summarizes interactive and experiential trends in teaching and learning and tries to locate digital simulation’s position in these trends.
Abstract: This section summarizes interactive and experiential trends in teaching and learning. It tries to locate digital simulation’s position in these trends. In doing so, it explores the educational merits of digital simulation, discusses the learning mode of digital simulation, and outlines what digital simulation conveys to deliver educational contents. The interactive, experiential Trend in Digital Teaching and learning

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A general pattern of online related behaviours that seem to be taking place among Malaysian pre-adolescents and adolescents and its possible impact on their behaviours leading towards cyber-related crimes is provided.
Abstract: The threat of cyber-related crimes due to excessive usage of Internet and current e-behaviour amongst the younger children is not new in this new millennium but stays as an issue for consideration. This paper provide a general pattern of online related behaviours that seem to be taking place among Malaysian pre-adolescents and adolescents and its possible impact on their behaviours leading towards cyber-related crimes. Facts and finding from various researches conducted from different parts of the world, including Malaysia were reviewed. The results from various studies reveal that a great concern and strategies have to be put into place as the age group using the Internet has reduced and the routine activity of pre-adolescence and adolescence are changing and are based on Internet. Non-awareness of their current online behaviours and its possible link to cyber-related crimes may lead these young children to a greater threat when using e-Commerce or any other Internet dependent activities in the future. This paper focuses on the facts collected from various studies to justify the importance of having future research on this phenomenon.

14 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: This study reviews several of the most commonly used inductive teaching methods, including inquiry learning, problem-based learning, project-basedLearning, case-based teaching, discovery learning, and just-in-time teaching, and defines each method, highlights commonalities and specific differences, and reviews research on the effectiveness.
Abstract: Traditional engineering instruction is deductive, beginning with theories and progressing to the applications of those theories Alternative teaching approaches are more inductive Topics are introduced by presenting specific observations, case studies or problems, and theories are taught or the students are helped to discover them only after the need to know them has been established This study reviews several of the most commonly used inductive teaching methods, including inquiry learning, problem-based learning, project-based learning, case-based teaching, discovery learning, and just-in-time teaching The paper defines each method, highlights commonalities and specific differences, and reviews research on the effectiveness of the methods While the strength of the evidence varies from one method to another, inductive methods are consistently found to be at least equal to, and in general more effective than, traditional deductive methods for achieving a broad range of learning outcomes

1,673 citations

01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: This special issue is to indicate foresight, innovation, and strategy for the future direction of e-learning, more than web-oriented teaching and multipoint videoconferencing, for collaborative, distributed, experiential learning and creation of new knowledge, with youngsters around the world, which hence promote mutual understanding for global peace.
Abstract: In this special issue is to indicate foresight, innovation, and strategy for the future direction of e-learning, more than web-oriented teaching and multipoint videoconferencing, for collaborative, distributed, experiential learning and creation of new knowledge, with youngsters around the world, which hence promote mutual understanding for global peace. Emphasis will be on knowledgeable and inspiring papers (but not limited) on the use of GRID networking technology with distributed computer simulation for experiential (hands-on) learning through broadband Internet, across national, continental and oceanic boundaries. Subjects are in any fields of e-learning and e-healthcare/telemedicine, in research, case studies, project descriptions, implementation, reports from the field or book review. Preparing this special issue with Dr. Salmon, took 6 months, from the beginning to the arrival period to the on your screen. This period was shorter than the first special issue publishing in 2004. Of course this success belongs to this issue's guest editor who I will explain a bit details him belove and what did he do during in his period. During this process, Dr. Salmon served very healthy communication between the authors. In addition, she spared his valuable time, beside his other academic activities and responsibilities in the name of her university, her lectures, and researches, duties for distance education field and for TOJDE as well. Each article in this issue has therefore been read carefully by Gilly; me and Dr. Gokdag. This process has maximized the quality and rigour of the published articles. In addition to the articles, " notes for editor " books review and news, sections are still keeping in this issue too. "Anadolu University's Articles" and "TOJDE's links are getting more" columns are still keeping in this issue too. I would like to express my sincere thanks especially to Dr. Salmon in the name of my University and also for TOJDE she was the leader of the guest editorial team in this special issue. She will give detail info about structure of the articles in her " From Guest Editors " article. I strongly believe that experience gained on this third special issue would encourage us and other interested colleagues in the field in the near future. Below you will find short biodata about guest editors. He interested in heavily with the applications of distance education in Turkey, profile of the distance education students and graduates, additionally relationships of the distance education graduates and market. And last but not …

292 citations

Book
01 Feb 1997
TL;DR: This presentation discusses the design of the Multimedia Toolset, a set of tools and resources for learning through interactive media, and some of the approaches taken in the development of this toolset.
Abstract: Introduction. LEARNING THROUGH INTERACTIVE MEDIA. 1. The Multimedia Learning Revolution. 2. Resources and Tools for Learning. 3. Simulation and Vicarious Experience. 4. Structured Learning. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN: 5. Strategic Approaches to Educational Multimedia Design. 6. Context and Multimedia Design. 7. Design Action Potential. PRESENTATION DESIGN: 9. The Multimedia Toolset. 10. Text and Graphics. 11. Animation. 12. Sound.

283 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The findings show little association between user interface and programming comprehension, although there may be an order-affect when introducing user interfaces.
Abstract: In recent years, educational robotics has become an increasingly popular research area. However, limited studies have focused on differentiated learning outcomes based on type of programming interface. This study aims to explore how successfully young children master foundational programming concepts based on the robotics user interface (tangible, graphical, hybrid) taught in their curriculum. Thirty-five Kindergarten students participated in a 9-week robotics curriculum using the LEGO WeDo robotics construction kit and the Creative Hybrid Environment for Robotic Programming (CHERP) programming language. A mixed methods data collection approach was employed, including qualitative observational data from the classrooms, as well as quantitative mid- and post-test assessments of students’ programming knowledge using CHERP. The findings show little association between user interface and programming comprehension, although there may be an order-affect when introducing user interfaces. Implications for best practices when introducing programming in early childhood settings are discussed.

166 citations