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Marcel Martel

Bio: Marcel Martel is an academic researcher from York University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Public policy & Style (visual arts). The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 29 publications receiving 260 citations.


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Dissertation
14 Aug 2017
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a Table of Table of contents of the paper "Acknowledgements and acknowledgements of the authors of this paper: https://www.goprocessor.org/
Abstract: ........................................................................................................................................................ ii Acknowledgements ...................................................................................................................................... iii Table of

123 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper conducted interviews with 41 adult Canadian users between 2005 and 2006 and found that participants were predominantly middle class, employed in a wide range of occupations, and used marijuana recreationally to enhance relaxation and concentration while engaged in leisure activities.
Abstract: The Canadian Special Senate Committee on Illegal Drugs (2003) noted that little ethnographic research had been devoted to exploring why people use marijuana recreationally or the social contexts in which it is used. The purpose of this exploratory qualitative research is to better understand both of these neglected topics through interviews conducted with 41 adult Canadian users between 2005 and 2006. The participants' ages ranged from 21 to 61 and included 25 males and 16 females whose consumption patterns ranged from sporadic use to regular daily use. They were predominantly middle class, employed in a wide range of occupations, and used marijuana recreationally to enhance relaxation and concentration while engaged in leisure activities. Implications for drug laws and policies are discussed. The study's limitations are noted.

90 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The privileged normalization of marijuana by the media has important health policy implications in light of continued debate regarding the merits of decriminalization or legalization and the need for public health and harm reduction approaches to illicit drug use.
Abstract: The objective of this study was to systematically examine predominant themes within mainstream media reporting about marijuana use in Canada To ascertain the themes present in major Canadian newspaper reports, a sample (N = 1999) of articles published between 1997 and 2007 was analyzed Drawing from Manning’s theory of the symbolic framing of drug use within media, it is argued that a discourse of ‘privileged normalization’ informs portrayals of marijuana use and descriptions of the drug’s users Privileged normalization implies that marijuana use can be acceptable for some people at particular times and places, while its use by those without power and status is routinely vilified and linked to deviant behavior The privileged normalization of marijuana by the media has important health policy implications in light of continued debate regarding the merits of decriminalization or legalization and the need for public health and harm reduction approaches to illicit drug use

64 citations

DissertationDOI
01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a Table of Table of contents of the paper "Acknowledgements and acknowledgements of the authors of this paper: https://www.goprocessor.org/
Abstract: .......................................................................................................................................... ii Acknowledgements ........................................................................................................................ iii Table of

55 citations

DissertationDOI
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: Arrighi et al. as mentioned in this paper explored how migration politics are being fought over not only across society but also across territory in two well-researched cases of protracted nationalist mobilisation, Catalonia and Scotland.
Abstract: Whilst minority nationalism and migration have been intensely studied in relative isolation from one another, research examining their mutual relationship is still scarce. This dissertation aims to fill this gap in the literature by exploring how migration politics are being fought over not only across society but also across territory in two well‐researched cases of protracted nationalist mobilisation, Catalonia and Scotland. It meets three objectives: First, it introduces a theoretical framework accounting for sub‐state elites’ and administrations’ boundary‐making strategies in relation to immigrants and emigrants. Second, it systematically compares the evolution of boundary‐making strategies in Catalonia and Scotland, prior to and after the establishment of self‐governing institutions. Third, it identifies the circumstances under which nationalists came to adopt a predominantly territorial conception of national membership, privileging the inclusion of immigrants over that of emigrant populations. The main hypothesis states that minority nationalists have a vested interest in emphasizing residency as a significant criterion of national membership irrespectively of one’s place of birth and degree of attachment to the land in order to enhance their internal and external legitimacy. In addition, the location of the membership boundary depends upon the relative openness of the Territorial Opportunity Structure, which comprises three dimensions: the formal distribution of migration‐related competencies, the initial boundary and its implications for later developments, and the dynamics of party competition at sub‐state level. The empirical analysis shows that the attitudes of political elites in Scotland and Catalonia towards immigrants and emigrants have been shifting through time. This illustrates how nations are constantly constructed and reconstructed through processes of boundary‐building, in a context also shaped by state‐wide nationalism. The findings corroborate to a considerable extent the main hypothesis and show that dynamics of party competition have played a greater role in affecting boundary‐making strategies in relation to immigrants and emigrants than historical path dependencies or the formal distribution of competencies. Jury: Michael Keating, EUI (Co‐supervisor), Dr Nicola McEwen, University of Edinburgh, Rainer Bauböck, EUI (Supervisor), Andreas Wimmer, UCLA (via videolink) Bio: Jean‐Thomas Arrighi joined the SPS department in September 2007. He holds an MA with distinction in Contemporary European Studies from the University of Bath and an MRes in Political and Social Sciences from the European University Institute. In 2009, he was visiting scholar at the Interdisciplinary Research Group on Immigration (GRITIM) within the Department of Political Science of the Pompeu Fabra University, and at the Institute of Governance of the University of Edinburgh. His research interest is at the crossroads of territorial politics, nationalism and migration studies in a comparative perspective.

46 citations