scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Margaret Moore

Other affiliations: University of Waterloo
Bio: Margaret Moore is an academic researcher from Queen's University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Nationalism & Argument. The author has an hindex of 15, co-authored 47 publications receiving 1183 citations. Previous affiliations of Margaret Moore include University of Waterloo.

Papers
More filters
BookDOI
08 Oct 1998
TL;DR: The Self-Determination Principle and the Ethics of Secession are discussed in this paper, where they are combined with the principle of national self-determination and the concept of national autonomy.
Abstract: 1. Introduction: The Self-Determination Principle and the Ethics of Secession 2. Democracy and Secession 3. The Ethics of Secession as the Regulation of Secessionist Politics 4. Secession and the Principle of Nationality 5. Self-Determination in Practice 6. Liberal Nationalism and Secession 7. The Territorial Dimension of Self-Determination 8. National Self-Determination: Some Cautionary Remarks Concerning the Rhetoric of Rights 9. Self-Determination: Politics, Philosophy, Law 10. Orphans of Secession: National Pluralism in Secessionist Regions and Post-Secession States 11. Myths and Misconceptions in the Study of Nationalism

189 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: The Ethics of Nationalism as discussed by the authors is a set of arguments for the creation of a nation-state, including the Intrinsic Argument (or, Are Nations Moral Communities?) and the Cultural Argument (Beyond) The Cultural Argument.
Abstract: 1. The Ethics of Nationalism PART ONE: MEMBERSHIP 2. The Intrinsic Argument (or, Are Nations Moral Communities?) 3. (Beyond) The Cultural Argument 4. Instrumental Arguments, (or, Why States Need Nations) 5. Implications: The Ethics of Nation-Building PART TWO: LAND 6. Just-Cause, Administrative Boundaries and the Politics of Denial 7. Self-Determination, Rights to Territory and the Politics of Respect 8. Implications: The Ethics of Secession

182 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1992-Noûs

168 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: The making and unmaking of boundaries from the Natural Law perspective has been studied extensively in the last few decades as discussed by the authors, with a focus on the making and re-making of the boundaries of the Holy Land.
Abstract: 1. Introduction Allen Buchanan and Margaret Moore Part I. The Jewish Tradition: 2. Making and unmaking the boundaries of the Holy Land Menachem Lorberbaum 3. Man-made boundaries and man-made holiness in the Jewish tradition Daniel Statman Part II. The Confucian Tradition: 4. The making and unmaking of boundaries: a contemporary Confucian perspective Daniel Bell 5. Borders of our minds: territories, boundaries, and power in the Confucian tradition L. H. M. Ling Part III. The Christian Tradition: 6. The Christian tradition Anthony Pagden 7. Christianity and territorial right Reverend Oliver O'Donovan Part IV. The Natural Law Tradition: 8. The making and unmaking of boundaries from the Natural Law perspective Richard Tuck 9. Natural Law and the re-making of boundaries John Finnis Part V. The Islamic Tradition: 10. Political boundaries and moral communities: an Islamic perspective Sohail H. Hashmi 11. The unbounded law of God and territorial boundaries Khaled Abou El Fadl Part VI. The Liberal Tradition: 12. The making and unmaking of boundaries: what liberalism has to say Allen Buchanan 13. Liberalism and boundaries: a response to Allen Buchanan David Miller Part VI. The International Law Tradition: 14. The making and unmaking of boundaries: international law Andrew Hurrell 15. People and boundaries: an internationalized public law approach Benedict Kingsbury Part VIII. Conclusion: 16. Overview Margaret Moore.

105 citations

Book
29 Apr 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a theory of territory based on individual Moral Rights of Residency, Collective Moral rights of Occupancy and a People's Rights of Self-determination.
Abstract: Acknowledgements 1. Why do we need a Political Theory of Territory? 2. What is Territory? conceptual analysis and justificatory burdens. 3. Foundations of a Theory of Territory: Individual Moral Rights of Residency, Collective Moral Rights of Occupancy and a People's Rights of Self-determination. 4. Non-Statist Theories of Territory 5. Functionalist/Statist Theories of Territory 6. Heartlands, Contested Areas Secession, and Boundaries 7. Corrective Justice and the Wrongful Taking of Land, Territory and Property 8. Territorial Rights and Natural Resources 9. Territorial Rights and Rights to control Borders/Immigration 10. The Right to Territorial Integrity and the Legitimacy of the Use of Force. 11. Conclusion. Bibliography Index

90 citations


Cited by
More filters
Posted Content
TL;DR: McQueen et al. as mentioned in this paper presented a special symposium issue of Social Identities under the editorship of Griffith University's Rob McQueen and UBC's Wes Pue and with contributions from McQueen, Ian Duncanson, Renisa Mawani, David Williams, Emma Cunliffe, Chidi Oguamanam, W. Wesley Pue, Fatou Camara, and Dianne Kirkby.
Abstract: Scholars of culture, humanities and social sciences have increasingly come to an appreciation of the importance of the legal domain in social life, while critically engaged socio-legal scholars around the world have taken up the task of understanding "Law's Empire" in all of its cultural, political, and economic dimensions. The questions arising from these intersections, and addressing imperialisms past and present forms the subject matter of a special symposium issue of Social Identities under the editorship of Griffith University's Rob McQueen, and UBC's Wes Pue and with contributions from McQueen, Ian Duncanson, Renisa Mawani, David Williams, Emma Cunliffe, Chidi Oguamanam, W. Wesley Pue, Fatou Camara, and Dianne Kirkby. This paper introduces the volume, forthcoming in late 2007. The central problematique of this issue has previously been explored through the 2005 Law's Empire conference, an informal but vibrant postcolonial legal studies network.

1,813 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The study of borders has undergone a renaissance during the past decade, reflected in an impressive list of conferences, workshops and scholarly publications as mentioned in this paper. But this meeting of disciplines has not yet succeeded in creating a common language or glossary of terms which is relevant to all scholars of borders.
Abstract: The study of borders has undergone a renaissance during the past decade. This is reflected in an impressive list of conferences, workshops and scholarly publications. This renaissance has been partly due to the emergence of a counternarrative to the borderless and deterritorialized world discourse which has accompanied much of globalization theory. The study of borders has moved beyond the limited confines of the political geography discourse, crossing its own disciplinary boundaries, to include sociologists, political scientists, historians, international lawyers and scholars of international relations. But this meeting of disciplines has not yet been successful in creating a common language or glossary of terms which is relevant to all scholars of borders. Central to the contemporary study of borders are notions such as 'borders are institutions', the process of 'bordering' as a dynamic in its own right, and the border terminologies which focus on the binary distinctions between the 'us' and 'them', the 'included' and the 'excluded'. Borders should be studied not only from a top-down perspective, but also from the bottom up, with a focus on the individual border narratives and experiences, reflecting the ways in which borders impact upon the daily life practices of people living in and around the borderland and transboundary transition zones. In positing an agenda for the next generation of border-related research, borders should be seen for their potential to constitute bridges and points of contact, as much as they have traditionally constituted barriers to movement and communication.

715 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a collection of essays based on the Locke Lectures that Nagel delivered at Oxford University in 1990 addresses the conflict between the claims of the group and those of the individual.
Abstract: This collection of essays, based on the Locke Lectures that Nagel delivered at Oxford University in 1990, addresses the conflict between the claims of the group and those of the individual. Nagel attempts to clarify the nature of the conflict - one of the most fundamental problems in moral and political theory - and concludes that its reconciliation is the essential task of any legitimate political system.

582 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors considers how deliberative democracy can process the toughest issues concerning mutually contradictory assertions of identity and makes the case for a power sharing state with attenuated sovereignty and a more engaged deliberative politics in a public sphere that is semidetached from the state and situated transnationally.
Abstract: For contemporary democratic theorists, democracy is largely a matter of deliberation. But the recent rise of deliberative democracy (in practice as well as theory) coincided with ever more prominent identity politics, sometimes in murderous form in deeply divided societies. This essay considers how deliberative democracy can process the toughest issues concerning mutually contradictory assertions of identity. After considering the alternative answers provided by agonists and consociational democrats, the author makes the case for a power-sharing state with attenuated sovereignty and a more engaged deliberative politics in a public sphere that is semidetached from the state and situated transnationally.

373 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

344 citations