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Margaret Stefana Drower

Bio: Margaret Stefana Drower is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Pottery & Egyptology. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 6 publications receiving 111 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Petrie has been called the "father of modern Egyptology" as discussed by the authors, and indeed he is one of the pioneers of modern archeological methods, and his life from his boyhood, when he was already a budding scholar, through his stunning career in the deserts of Egypt to his death in Jerusalem at the age of 89.
Abstract: Flinders Petrie has been called the \"Father of Modern Egyptology\" - and indeed he is one of the pioneers of modern archeological methods. Here Margaret S. Drower, a student of Petrie's in the early 1930s, traces his life from his boyhood, when he was already a budding scholar, through his stunning career in the deserts of Egypt to his death in Jerusalem at the age of 89. Drower presents Petrie as he was: an enthusiastic eccentric, diligently plunging into the uncharted past of ancient Egypt. She tells not only of his spectacular finds, including the tombs of the first Pharaohs, the earliest alphabetic script, a Homer manuscript, and a collection of painted portraits on mummy cases, but also of Petrie's important contributions to the science of modern archaeology, such as orderly record-keeping of the progress of a dig and the use of pottery sherds in historical dating.

58 citations

Book
01 Sep 1985
TL;DR: Petrie has been called the "father of modern Egyptology" and indeed he is one of the pioneers of modern archeological methods as discussed by the authors. But his life from his boyhood, when he was already a budding scholar, through his stunning career in the deserts of Egypt to his death in Jerusalem at the age of 89.
Abstract: Flinders Petrie has been called the "Father of Modern Egyptology" - and indeed he is one of the pioneers of modern archeological methods. Here Margaret S. Drower, a student of Petrie's in the early 1930s, traces his life from his boyhood, when he was already a budding scholar, through his stunning career in the deserts of Egypt to his death in Jerusalem at the age of 89. Drower presents Petrie as he was: an enthusiastic eccentric, diligently plunging into the uncharted past of ancient Egypt. She tells not only of his spectacular finds, including the tombs of the first Pharaohs, the earliest alphabetic script, a Homer manuscript, and a collection of painted portraits on mummy cases, but also of Petrie's important contributions to the science of modern archaeology, such as orderly record-keeping of the progress of a dig and the use of pottery sherds in historical dating.

37 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the relevance of archaeological history is discussed, including the origins of scientific archaeology, the imperial synthesis, and the development of modern archaeology in the 20th century.
Abstract: List of illustrations Preface 1. The relevance of archaeological history 2. Classical archaeology and antiquarianism 3. The beginnings of scientific archaeology 4. The imperial synthesis 5. Culture-historical archaeology 6. Soviet archaeology 7. Functionalism in Western archaeology 8. Neo-evolutionism and the New Archaeology 9. The explanation of diversity 10. Archaeology and its social context Bibliographical essay References Index.

956 citations

Book
23 Nov 2017
TL;DR: Brooks Hedstrom as discussed by the authors traces how scholars identified a space or site as monastic within the Egyptian landscape and how such identifications impacted perceptions of monasticism, and provides an ecohistory of Egypt's tripartite landscape to offer a reorientation of the perception of the physical landscape.
Abstract: Darlene L. Brooks Hedstrom offers a new history of the field of Egyptian monastic archaeology. It is the first study in English to trace how scholars identified a space or site as monastic within the Egyptian landscape and how such identifications impacted perceptions of monasticism. Brooks Hedstrom then provides an ecohistory of Egypt's tripartite landscape to offer a reorientation of the perception of the physical landscape. She analyzes late-antique documentary evidence, early monastic literature, and ecclesiastical history before turning to the extensive archaeological evidence of Christian monastic settlements. In doing so, she illustrates the stark differences between idealized monastic landscape and the actual monastic landscape that was urbanized through monastic constructions. Drawing upon critical theories in landscape studies, materiality and phenomenology, Brooks Hedstrom looks at domestic settlements of non-monastic and monastic settlements to posit what features makes monastic settlements unique, thus offering a new history of monasticism in Egypt.

164 citations

Book
11 Feb 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, the provenance of ancient glass is investigated and a chemical analysis of early glass is carried out in order to understand the evolution from small-to large-scale glass production from Hellenistic to Roman.
Abstract: 1 Glass as a material: a technological background in fiaence, pottery and metal? 2 Ways to flux silica: ashes and minerals 3 Silica, lime and glass colorants 4 Glass chemical compositions 5 Early glass: archaeology 6 Scientific analysis of early glass 7 Hellenistic to Roman: a change from small- to large-scale glass production? 8 Scientific studies of Hellenistic and early Roman glass 9 Islamic glass: technological continuity and innovation 10 Chemical analyses of Islamic glasses 11 The provenance of ancient glass 12 Conclusions

138 citations

Book
01 Dec 2006
TL;DR: A collection of 22 essays presenting the latest research on a comprehensive range of questions relating to the Greek presence at the site of Egyptian Naukratis as it is reflected in the pottery from there is presented in this article.
Abstract: This is a collection of 22 essays presenting the latest research on a comprehensive range of questions relating to the Greek presence at the site of Egyptian Naukratis as it is reflected in the pottery from there. The volume includes scientific analysis and is richly illustrated with photographs including colour illustrations, line drawings, maps and tables.

121 citations

Book
22 Jan 2019
TL;DR: Scattered Finds as discussed by the authors explores the politics, personalities and social histories that linked fieldwork in Egypt with the varied organizations around the world that received finds, including Victorian municipal museums and women's suffrage campaigns in the UK, and from university museums in Japan to new institutions in post-independence Ghana.
Abstract: Between the 1880s and 1980s, British excavations at locations across Egypt resulted in the discovery of hundreds of thousands of ancient objects that were subsequently sent to some 350 institutions worldwide. These finds included unique discoveries at iconic sites such as the tombs of ancient Egypt's first rulers at Abydos, Akhenaten and Nefertiti’s city of Tell el-Amarna and rich Roman Era burials in the Fayum. Scattered Finds explores the politics, personalities and social histories that linked fieldwork in Egypt with the varied organizations around the world that received finds. Case studies range from Victorian municipal museums and women’s suffrage campaigns in the UK, to the development of some of the USA’s largest institutions, and from university museums in Japan to new institutions in post-independence Ghana. By juxtaposing a diversity of sites for the reception of Egyptian cultural heritage over the period of a century, Alice Stevenson presents new ideas about the development of archaeology, museums and the construction of Egyptian heritage. She also addresses the legacy of these practices, raises questions about the nature of the authority over such heritage today, and argues for a stronger ethical commitment to its stewardship.

96 citations