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Mari Hatavara

Bio: Mari Hatavara is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Narrative & Storytelling. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 25 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigate the linguistic representation of the British Prime Minister, Theresa May's, internal monologue in a satirical newspaper article, and they argue that this cross-fictional, stylistic approach better accounts for the satire effects of fictionality in the text than those which place a premium on authorial intentions and the invented nature of the narrative discourse.
Abstract: In this article, we approach fictionality as a set of semiotic strategies prototypically associated with fictional forms of storytelling (Hatavara and Mildorf, 2017a, 2017b). Whilst these strategies are strongly associated with fiction, they might also be used in non-fictional contexts – or those in which the ontological status of the narrative is ambivalent – to create ‘cross-fictional’ rhetorical effects (Hatavara and Mildorf, 2017b). We focus on one such strategy – the representation of thought and consciousness. Using the concept of ‘mind style’ (Fowler, 1977 and 1996 [1986]; Leech and Short, 1980; Semino, 2007), we investigate the linguistic representation of the British Prime Minister, Theresa May’s, internal monologue in a satirical newspaper article. Throughout the article, the author uses cross-fictionality strategies to represent what May ‘really thinks’ as she delivers a speech to the Conservative Party conference. The stylistic analysis of the Prime Minister’s mind style facilitates an account of the elaborate and nuanced mixing of May and the author’s ideological perspectives throughout the piece. We argue that this cross-fictional, stylistic approach better accounts for the satirical effects of fictionality in the text than those which place a premium on authorial intention and the invented nature of the narrative discourse (for example, Nielsen, Phelan and Walsh, 2015).

10 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: This poster presents a probabilistic procedure to characterize the response of the immune system to EMT and shows clear down-regulation in response to EMMARM.
Abstract: Reference EPFL-ARTICLE-223260View record in Web of Science Record created on 2016-11-21, modified on 2016-11-21

653 citations

01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe how to do things with words with words. But they do not discuss how to use them with words in the context of games, games, etc.
Abstract: 言语行为理论是哲学和语言学,特别是语言哲学和语用学的重要理论之一。与言语行为理论有关的诸多著作中,最重要最经典的是奥斯汀的How to Do Things with Words。然而这不是一本易读的书,为此作者分析了该书的脉络,给准备精读该书的读者提供一些参考。

461 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
27 May 2000-BMJ
TL;DR: All competent politicians know how to coin weasel words, but none is as good at it as Tony Blair and “new Labour,” according to Norman Fairclough in this penetrating disquisition, refreshingly free of sociolinguistic jargon and bolstered by linguistic evidence and analysis.
Abstract: ![][1] Norman Fairclough Routledge, £9.99, pp 178 ISBN 0 415 21827 6 Rating: ![Graphic][2] ![Graphic][3] ![Graphic][4] ![Graphic][5] “I can suck melancholy out of a song,” says Shakespeare's Jaques, “as a weasel sucks eggs.” Hence the phrase “weasel words,” coined for political purposes in the United States at the end of the 19th century and used (most famously by Theodore Roosevelt, criticising President Woodrow Wilson) to describe rhetoric that sounds as if it has substance but is actually empty of specific meaning, or is at best ambiguous and vague. All competent politicians know, often purely instinctively, how to coin weasel words, or at least how to use them. But none is as good at it as Tony Blair and “new Labour,” according to Norman Fairclough in this penetrating disquisition, refreshingly free of sociolinguistic jargon and bolstered by linguistic evidence and analysis. Some short words make superb weasels. Like “we.” Not much ambiguity there, you might think. But “we” … [1]: /embed/graphic-1.gif [2]: /embed/inline-graphic-1.gif [3]: /embed/inline-graphic-2.gif [4]: /embed/inline-graphic-3.gif [5]: /embed/inline-graphic-4.gif

277 citations

01 Jan 1984

180 citations

Journal Article

172 citations