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Maria Elena Marescotti

Bio: Maria Elena Marescotti is an academic researcher from University of Milan. The author has contributed to research in topics: Supply chain & Agriculture. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 23 publications receiving 129 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a random sample of Italian consumers was recruited and three different consumer segments were identified: pro-animal consumers, disoriented consumers, and hunted wild game meat eaters.

55 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a model for the assessment of the social pillar of sustainability at the farm scale is proposed, which is based on a set of 15 indicators able to evaluate five main social components: quality of the products and the region, short supply chain and related activities, work, ethical and human development and society, culture and ecology.
Abstract: The present research proposes a model for the assessment of the social pillar of sustainability at the farm scale. Contrary to what is available for the environmental and economic pillars, there is a considerable lack of exhaustive approaches able to evaluate the social dimension of sustainability in rural areas. Thus, the idea was to create a mean by which a quantitative evaluation of the social characteristics of farms could be made. The study involved farms of the South Milan Agricultural Park, located in northern Italy. Thirty sampled farms were selected in order to represent the different livestock systems, land areas, economic dimensions and levels of multifunctionality of the area. The framework is based on a set of 15 indicators able to evaluate five main social “components”: (i) quality of the products and the region, (ii) short supply chain and related activities, (iii) work, (iv) ethical and human development and (v) society, culture and ecology. The work was structured using the following steps: identification of the relevant variables for the social sustainability of farms, determination of the framework of indicators, assignment of their range scores, data collection, calculation of the score for each farm, data analysis and visualization. The method allows different types of analysis in relation to the objective of the research. Three main approaches were individuated: (1) the comparison among farms is the “farms’ ranking” and the “aggregate ranking”; (2) the evaluation of single themes of sustainability is the “single indicator evaluation” approach and (3) the temporal comparison of the farm’s result is the “score evolution” approach. The method showed a high sensitivity to the multifunctionality and the type of farm production, especially organic vs conventional, while other characteristics, such as the type of livestock and the land area, seem to differentiate the sample less or to characterize it in only a few social components. The work has underlined the importance and the advancement in the study of the social dimension that, however, needs further in-depth analysis through comparison with the other two pillars and among various social states in different rural areas.

34 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Even though the European Union has imposed a mandatory labeling system for conventional meats, there is no mandatory labeling scheme for the so-called "minor meats" such as hunted wild game meat as discussed by the authors.

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
29 Mar 2021-Heliyon
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the short-term and long-term effects of the COVID-19 emergency on consumers' decision of changing dietary habit and found that psychological pressure was associated with impulsive approach to buy food.

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an analysis of the evolution of price in the local red deer meat supply chain through a survey based on in-depth interviews with the stakeholders involved in an Italian local supply chain.
Abstract: Although in recent decades, meat from hunted wild ungulates has shown interesting results in terms of market opportunities, the scientific literature is still lacking in economic studies concerning the estimation of the meat’s value for involved stakeholders. We present an analysis of the evolution of price in the local red deer meat supply chain. This analysis has been conducted through a survey based on in-depth interviews with the stakeholders involved in an Italian local supply chain. Findings derived from this study describe a case study, however, they also represent the potential dynamics of the value of Italian game meat, highlighting that the development of a sustainable local supply chain of this product may represent an economic resource for involved stakeholders.

15 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 2017-Appetite
TL;DR: It is found that female consumers show high acceptance for some functional dairy products, such as yogurt enriched with calcium, fiber and probiotics, and products with "natural" matches between carriers and ingredients have the highest level of acceptance among consumers.

155 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors highlight a lethal connection between novel coronavirus pneumonia and wildlife consumption in tourism and highlight the link between NCP and tourism and wildlife tourism, while NCP continues to make headlines in mainstream media.
Abstract: This opinion piece highlights a lethal connection between novel coronavirus pneumonia (NCP) and wildlife consumption in tourism. While NCP continues to make headlines in the mainstream media, littl...

71 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a systematic literature review is performed where 621 articles are analyzed considering a set of categories that include: research methodology; social dimension; social analysis focus; supply chain entities; traceability and transparency; uncertainty and risk; industrial activity sector.

67 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The management of wild ungulate populations is a complex subject, and each case should be studied, analysing the cost-performance balance of measures to be taken, and ensuring ongoing financial means to carry out and continue with successful ecosystem management strategies as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Throughout recent years, ungulates have experienced significant increases in numbers and geographic range sizes in Europe, becoming locally overabundant populations in some regions. Changes in legislation regarding poaching, abandonment of land and re‐naturalisation of habitats, and decreasing numbers of hunters, among other things, have led to alarming scenarios in wild ungulate biology. Although ungulates bring some financial benefits for ecosystems and society through tourism and hunting, the problems associated with populations that are no longer controlled can outweigh the advantages. Damage to forestry and agriculture, ungulate‐vehicle collisions, and diseases are among the most concerning problems related to ungulate overabundance. To deal with these problems and to decide on the best management strategy to apply, it is essential to have tools available to monitor populations with an integrative approach based on ecological change indicators, and to assess population and ecosystem status. Furthermore, in a globalised world, people’s opinions matter, and sociological studies regarding human perception of wild mammals must take place in order to allow proper management, including consideration of people’s expectations as well as animal and ecosystem needs. Successful and unsuccessful management strategies have already been attempted, and the knowledge of consequences over time enables an adaptive approach. Management of ungulate populations is a complex subject, and each case should be studied, analysing the cost_performance balance of measures to be taken, and ensuring ongoing financial means to carry out and continue with successful ecosystem management strategies. Multidisciplinary teams should be built, including biologists, veterinarians, stakeholders, sociologists, and others, to deal with the management of European wild ungulate populations.

67 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the factors affecting children's likelihood of carrying on the family business in a sample of 216 potential heirs of Italian horticultural farms using local labour market conditions (income gap and employment rate) and surrounding context variables (population density) and plug the farm labour migration/occupational choice theory into farm succession analysis.

63 citations