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María José Cuenca García

Bio: María José Cuenca García is an academic researcher from Autonomous University of Barcelona. The author has contributed to research in topics: Beam (structure) & Tamoxifen. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 14 publications receiving 169 citations. Previous affiliations of María José Cuenca García include University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center & University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Data suggest that antiretroviral therapy is able to induce the expression of the tolerogenic molecule HLA-G on peripheral monocytes from HIV-1 seropositive individuals.

40 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Gender differences in 28-day mortality rates for first or recurrent Q-wave and non-Q-wave myocardial infarctions and unstable angina were assessed by using data from 5 registries that included 20,836 patients.
Abstract: The type of acute coronary syndrome may account for different prognoses between men and women after myocardial infarction. This study assessed gender differences in 28-day mortality rates for first or recurrent Q-wave and non–Q-wave myocardial infarctions and unstable angina by using data from 5 registries that included 20,836 patients (24.8% women). Mortality rates were higher in women with first Q-wave myocardial infarction but not in the other patients after adjusting for confounding variables.

36 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The VLDL composition in 50 participants after 3 months of intake of two MD, supplemented with VOO or nuts, compared with a low-fat diet was assessed and it was concluded that the reduction in systemic TG concentrations observed after consumption of the MD may be explained by reduction of the lipid core of V LDL and a selective modification of the molecular species composition in the particle.
Abstract: The first results of the PREDIMED (PREvencion con Dieta MEDiterranea) randomized trial, after 3-month intervention, showed that the Mediterranean Diet (MD), supplemented with either virgin olive oil (VOO) or nuts, reduced systolic blood pressure, serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol (TG) concentrations and increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol when compared to a control (low-fat diet) group. Serum TG levels are an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease and are strongly determined by very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) composition, which can be specifically modified by dietary lipid source. Within the context of the PREDIMED study, we assessed the VLDL composition in 50 participants after 3 months of intake of two MD, supplemented with VOO or nuts, compared with a low-fat diet. Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations were reduced in subjects on the MD+nuts, whereas HDL-cholesterol increased after consumption of the MD+VOO. Serum TG concentrations were significantly lowered in both intervention groups (either the MD+nuts or MD+VOO). However, only the MD+VOO reduced the VLDL-cholesterol and VLDL-TG content and the TG/apolipoprotein B ratio in VLDL, which was used to estimate particle size. Although VLDL-TG fatty acids were very slightly modified, VLDL-TG molecular species in VLDL after consumption of the MD+nuts were characterized by a higher presence of linoleic acid (18:2, n-6), whereas after the intake of MD+VOO, they were rich in oleic acid (18:1, n-9). Therefore, we conclude that the reduction in systemic TG concentrations observed after consumption of the MD may be explained by reduction of the lipid core of VLDL and a selective modification of the molecular species composition in the particle.

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The challenges developing countries would face and enumerate the options to be used to achieve successful implementations of Big Data programs are described.
Abstract: Background: The volume of data, the velocity with which they are generated, and their variety and lack of structure hinder their use. This creates the need to change the way information is captured, stored, processed, and analyzed, leading to the paradigm shift called Big Data. Objectives: To describe the challenges and possible solutions for developing countries when implementing Big Data projects in the health sector. Methods: A non-systematic review of the literature was performed in PubMed and Google Scholar. The following keywords were used: “big data”, “developing countries”, “data mining”, “health information systems”, and “computing methodologies”. A thematic review of selected articles was performed. Results: There are challenges when implementing any Big Data program including exponential growth of data, special infrastructure needs, need for a trained workforce, need to agree on interoperability standards, privacy and security issues, and the need to include people, processes, and policies to ensure their adoption. Developing countries have particular characteristics that hinder further development of these projects. Conclusions: The advent of Big Data promises great opportunities for the healthcare field. In this article, we attempt to describe the challenges developing countries would face and enumerate the options to be used to achieve successful implementations of Big Data programs.

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
17 Dec 2020
TL;DR: In this paper, aprobación del Codigo penal de 1995, por la que se destierra el requisito del arrepentimiento espontaneo, and se facilita su aplicacion al reo, con independencia de cual sean los motivos de su actuacion.
Abstract: Debe saludarse como especialmente atinente la objetivacion de la atenuante que tiene lugar con la aprobacion del Codigo penal de 1995, por la que se destierra el requisito del arrepentimiento espontaneo, y se facilita su aplicacion al reo, con independencia de cual sean los motivos de su actuacion. La contrapartida de esa objetivacion radica en que la busqueda a toda costa de la efectiva reparacion del dano de la victima podria provocar fricciones tanto con el ideal de la justicia restaurativa, como con los fines del Derecho penal.

18 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The lack of good trial evidence concerning sex-specific outcomes has led to assumptions about CVD treatment in women, which may have resulted in inadequate diagnoses and suboptimal management, greatly affecting outcomes, and may also explain why cardiovascular health in women is not improving as fast as that of men.
Abstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in women. In fact, CVD is responsible for a third of all deaths of women worldwide and half of all deaths of women over 50 years of age in developing countries. The prevalence of CVD risk factor precursors is increasing in children. Retrospective analyses suggest that there are some clinically relevant differences between women and men in terms of prevalence, presentation, management and outcomes of the disease, but little is known about why CVD affects women and men differently. For instance, women with diabetes have a significantly higher CVD mortality rate than men with diabetes. Similarly, women with atrial fibrillation are at greater risk of stroke than men with atrial fibrillation. Historically, women have been underrepresented in clinical trials. The lack of good trial evidence concerning sex-specific outcomes has led to assumptions about CVD treatment in women, which in turn may have resulted in inadequate diagnoses and suboptimal management, greatly affecting outcomes. This knowledge gap may also explain why cardiovascular health in women is not improving as fast as that of men. Over the last decades, mortality rates in men have steadily declined, while those in women remained stable. It is also becoming increasingly evident that gender differences in cultural, behavioural, psychosocial and socioeconomic status are responsible, to various degrees, for the observed differences between women and men. However, the interaction between sex-and gender-related factors and CVD outcomes in women remains largely unknown.

475 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The understanding of gene regulation and the role of polymorphic sites on gene function may permit an individualized approach for the future use of HLA-G for therapeutic purposes.
Abstract: The HLA-G gene displays several peculiarities that are distinct from those of classical HLA class I genes. The unique structure of the HLA-G molecule permits a restricted peptide presentation and allows the modulation of the cells of the immune system. Although polymorphic sites may potentially influence all biological functions of HLA-G, those present at the promoter and 3′ untranslated regions have been particularly studied in experimental and pathological conditions. The relatively low polymorphism observed in the MHC-G coding region both in humans and apes may represent a strong selective pressure for invariance, whereas, in regulatory regions several lines of evidence support the role of balancing selection. Since HLA-G has immunomodulatory properties, the understanding of gene regulation and the role of polymorphic sites on gene function may permit an individualized approach for the future use of HLA-G for therapeutic purposes.

309 citations

Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: This work focuses on transplantation and oncology because these pathological contexts have been studied the most and also because they best represent the two opposite sides of HLA-G: beneficial to be promoted, or deleterious to be blocked.
Abstract: HLA-G is a molecule that was first known to confer protection to the fetus from destruction by the immune system of its mother, thus critically contributing to fetal-maternal tolerance. The first functional finding constituted the basis for HLA-G research and can be summarized as such: HLA-G, membrane-bound or soluble, strongly binds its inhibitory receptors on immune cells (NK, T, B, monocytes/dendritic cells), inhibits the functions of these effectors, and so induces immune inhibition. HLA-G function may therefore be beneficial because when expressed by a fetus or a transplant it protects them from rejection, or deleterious because when expressed by a tumor, it also protects it from antitumor immunity. This is the primary HLA-G function: that of a checkpoint molecule. Great work has been done in the past years to characterize HLA-G itself, its regulation, its functions and mechanisms of action, and its pathological relevance. We will review this here, focusing on transplantation and oncology because these pathological contexts have been studied the most and also because they best represent the two opposite sides of HLA-G: beneficial to be promoted, or deleterious to be blocked.

305 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The success of the 3rd International Conference on HLA-G reflects the interest and tremendous work of the many research teams which, over the years, contributed to the publication of more than 500 peer-review articles.
Abstract: In 1998, the first International Conference on human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) was held in Paris. At that time, HLA-G was still a new HLA class I molecule, few aspects of its immunological functions were known, and its expression by tumors was just being described. In 1998, tools to properly study HLA-G were lacking, especially monoclonal antibodies, and three conclusions were drawn after the congress: (i) animal models were needed, (ii) the biology of HLA-G isoforms had to be confirmed, and (iii) HLA-G expression by tumors required clarification. Five years later, these three issues have been addressed. HLA-G is now gaining pace and is investigated for its immuno-inhibitory functions in the context of multiple pathologies. Eighty five oral presentations were given this year for more than 200 investigators working on HLA-G by speakers from over 20 countries. The success of the 3rd International Conference on HLA-G reflects the interest and tremendous work of the many research teams which, over the years, contributed to the publication of more than 500 peer-review articles. We summarize the key points that were presented and discussed during this meeting.

146 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work assessed the effect of TMD on biomarkers related to heart failure in a high cardiovascular disease risk population and concluded that the traditional Mediterranean diet has a protective effect on these biomarkers.
Abstract: Aims Scarce data are available on the effect of the traditional Mediterranean diet (TMD) on heart failure biomarkers. We assessed the effect of TMD on biomarkers related to heart failure in a high cardiovascular disease risk population. Methods and Results A total of 930 subjects at high cardiovascular risk (420 men and 510 women) were recruited in the framework of a multicentre, randomized, controlled, parallel-group clinical trial directed at testing the efficacy of the TMD on the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (The PREDIMED Study). Participants were assigned to a low-fat diet (control, n = 310) or one of two TMDs [TMD + virgin olive oil (VOO) or TMD + nuts]. Depending on group assignment, participants received free provision of extra-virgin olive oil, mixed nuts, or small non-food gifts. After 1 year of intervention, both TMDs decreased plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, with changes reaching significance vs. control group (P < 0.05). Oxidized low-density lipoprotein decreased in both TMD groups (P < 0.05), the decrease in TMD + VOO group reaching significance vs. changes in control group (P = 0.003). Changes in lipoprotein(a) after TMD + VOO were less than those in the control group (P = 0.046) in which an increase (P = 0.035) was observed. No changes were observed in urinary albumin or albumin/creatinine ratio. Conclusions Individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) who improved their diet toward a TMD pattern reduced their N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide compared with those assigned to a low-fat diet. The same was found for in vivo oxidized low-density lipoprotein and lipoprotein(a) plasma concentrations after the TMD + VOO diet. From our results TMD could be a useful tool to mitigate against risk factors for heart failure. From our results TMD could modify markers of heart failure towards a more protective mode.

127 citations