scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Mariana P. Candido

Bio: Mariana P. Candido is an academic researcher from University of Notre Dame. The author has contributed to research in topics: Atlantic World & Colonialism. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 30 publications receiving 306 citations. Previous affiliations of Mariana P. Candido include University of Kansas & Princeton University.

Papers
More filters
Book
29 Mar 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors trace the history and development of the port of Benguela, the third largest port of slave embarkation on the coast of Africa, from the early seventeenth to the mid-nineteenth century.
Abstract: This book traces the history and development of the port of Benguela, the third largest port of slave embarkation on the coast of Africa, from the early seventeenth to the mid-nineteenth century. Benguela, located on the central coast of present-day Angola, was founded by the Portuguese in the early seventeenth century. In discussing the impact of the transatlantic slave trade on African societies, Mariana P. Candido explores the formation of new elites, the collapse of old states and the emergence of new states. Placing Benguela in an Atlantic perspective, this study shows how events in the Caribbean and Brazil affected social and political changes on the African coast. This book emphasizes the importance of the South Atlantic as a space for the circulation of people, ideas and crops.

78 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In o seculo dezessete, a participacao das tropas militares oriundas da colonia do Brasil no episodio da expulsao dos holandeses da Africa centro-ocidental, os lacos entre as colonias portuguesas do Brazil and Angola aumentaram gradativamente as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Em meados do seculo dezessete, com a participacao das tropas militares oriundas da colonia do Brasil no episodio da expulsao dos holandeses da Africa centro-ocidental, os lacos entre as colonias portuguesas do Brasil e Angola aumentaram gradativamente. Oficiais coloniais brasileiros, assim como degredados e comerciantes de grosso trato, chegaram ao porto de Benguela com objetivos e perspectivas diferentes. Enquanto uns foram deportados por crimes contra a coroa ou contra individuos para o porto conhecido como o "tumbeiro do homem branco," outros chegaram em busca de mao-de-obra escrava mais barata e abundante do que em outros portos africanos. Ocupando postos na administracao colonial, americanos, brasilicos ou brasileiros, como eram identificados nas fontes primarias, nao chegaram a formar uma comunidade a parte durante o seculo dezoito. Com a independencia do Brasil, um movimento liderado por brasileiros procurou unir a colonia de Benguela ao nascente imperio, com o intuito de evitar a pressao britânica interessada em abolir o trafico. O movimento fracassou e foi duramente reprimido pelas autoridades portuguesas. Porem, o conflito revela a separacao da comunidade de brasileiros a principios do seculo XIX, que ja nao se via mais identificada e representada pela coroa portuguesa. Esse artigo explora os lacos que uniam as colonias do Brasil e Benguela durante o periodo 1650-1850, buscando enfatizar o papel dos individuos nascidos no Brasil no comercio de escravos e na emergencia do porto de Benguela como num dos mais importantes no Atlântico Sul.

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose to delimit the entire continent of precolonial Africa during the era of the slave trade into broad regions and sub-regions that can allow the grouping of data effectively and meaningfully.
Abstract: In recent years, an increasing number of online archival databases of primary sources related to the history of the African diaspora and slavery have become freely and readily accessible for scholarly and public consumption. This proliferation of digital projects and databases presents a number of challenges related to aggregating data geographically according to the movement of people in and out of Africa across time and space. As a requirement to linking data of open-source digital projects, it has become necessary to delimit the entire continent of precolonial Africa during the era of the slave trade into broad regions and sub-regions that can allow the grouping of data effectively and meaningfully.

25 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the role of common women in the history of Benguela in the nineteenth century is emphasized, emphasizing the importance of parish records to unveil sectors of the society that tend to be invisible in the recent history of Angola.
Abstract: This study stresses the role of common women in the history of Benguela in the nineteenth century. I emphasize the importance of parish records to unveil sectors of the society that tend to be invisible in the history of Angola, such as farmers, poor women who acted as vendors in the urban centers, and particularly, enslaved women. While some attention has been paid to merchant women, the so-called donas , and on political leaders, particularly Queen Nzinga, the same cannot be said about the poor and the enslaved women. Parish records allow us to access bits of information on the lives of women who did not leave written records and did not gain attention from the Portuguese authorities. Resume: Cet article souligne le role joue par les femmes du peuple dans l’histoire de Benguela au XIXeme siecle. Ce papier met en valeur l’importance des registres paroissiaux pour reveler des secteurs de la societe qui ont tendance a rester invisibles dans l’histoire de l’Angola, comme les agriculteurs, les femmes pauvres qui travaillaient comme vendeuses dans les centres urbains et, en particulier, les femmes esclaves. Alors que les femmes participant au commerce, appelees donas , et les dirigeants politiques comme particulierement la reine Nzinga ont fait l’objet d’etudes, les pauvres et les femmes esclaves n’ont pas beneficie du meme traitement. Les registres paroissiaux nous permettent d’avoir acces a des miettes d’information sur la vie des femmes qui n’ont pas laisse de trace ecrite et qui n’ont pas attire l’attention des autorites portugaises.

24 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the process by which Benguela emerged as an important port of slave embarkation in West Central Africa and explore how the trade functioned in a region that was characterized by insecurity, stressing the role of traders and their links to other Atlantic ports.
Abstract: From its foundation in 1617, Benguela emerged into a significant coastal town in West Central Africa because of its valuable resources, including copper, ivory, and, most important of all, slaves.1 Indeed, after Manoel Cerveira Pereira founded the port town, it slowly became a critical gateway for the export of slaves from the heavily populated highlands of central Angola.2 Benguela was a necessary stop on the route between Lisbon and Luanda, the main Portuguese commercial entrepot on the West Central African coast. Despite the fact that Benguela was almost 700 kilometers south of Luanda, winds and ocean currents in the South Atlantic forced ship captains to sail south before reaching Luanda. The bay was well located for sailors in search of water and food, not to mention the need to repair damaged vessels, before heading north to Luanda, Ambriz or Cabinda. Although at first the Portuguese stayed close to the coast, eventually fortresses were established inland from Benguela, most notably at Caconda.3The earliest slave shipments from Benguela were destined for Luanda. But after 1716, slaves were sent directly from Benguela to the Americas, usually Brazil. As a result, slavery became a way of life in the town, attracting greedy individuals interested in profiting from the commerce in human beings. Within a short time Benguela became a major slaving port.4 Its merchants were able to supply substantial numbers of slaves from the interior into the Atlantic economy. Infamous for its unhealthy environment, Benguela remained a comparatively small town nonetheless, with a population rarely exceeding 3,000 people, as was enumerated in various censuses dating from the end of the eighteenth century. Even then, the population of the town was maintained only through the influx of people from the interior via caravans and from Brazil and Portugal via the sea. Despite its relatively small size, there was a continuous interaction among different people, both local and foreign.Local traders were co-opted into a system of credit and commerce that required adaptation to the demands of the Atlantic trade. While local authorities were technically subordinate to the governor in Luanda, physical distance, the absence of a strong military presence, and the difficulty of transportation enabled individuals to trade at Benguela without serious threat of interference from Luanda.3 Foreign merchants introduced textiles, beads, and other commodities that were used to purchase slaves in the interior. Benguela offered traders the possibility to operate beyond the influence and supervision of the Portuguese administration.6 As a result, the slave trade led to a great deal of social interaction among different peoples, some of which resulted in the intermarriage and cohabitation of European men with African womenThis article examines the process by which Benguela emerged as an important port of slave embarkation in West Central Africa. It explores how the trade functioned in a region that was characterized by insecurity, stressing the role of traders and their links to other Atlantic ports. Foreign and local traders were instrumental in the commercialization of captives to supply the transatlantic slave trade, in the distribution of imported goods to the interior, and the purchase of much needed foodstuffs. This essay also highlights the involvement of the government, Portuguese authorities, and church officials in the slave trade. The scope of this study covers the period when the slave trade from Benguela was at its height; from the 1750s, when reforms in trade regulations enacted in Portugal led to a significant increase in the volume of slaves exported from Benguela, to 1850, when the Brazilian government finally abolished the importation of slaves and thereby forced merchants in Benguela to end their slave export trade. While official correspondence and legislation do not provide much information on the actions of traders, nominal lists, wills and inventories, fiscal registers, ship licenses, and diaries that are to be found in archives in Angola, Brazil, and Portugal help to uncover how the business of the slave trade operated and allow comparison with other African slaving ports. …

24 citations


Cited by
More filters
01 Jan 1992
TL;DR: The body politics of Julia Kristeva and the Body Politics of JuliaKristeva as discussed by the authors are discussed in detail in Section 5.1.1 and Section 6.2.1.
Abstract: Preface (1999) Preface (1990) 1. Subjects of Sex/Gender/Desire I. 'Women' as the Subject of Feminism II. The Compulsory Order of Sex/Gender/Desire III. Gender: The Circular Ruins of Contemporary Debate IV. Theorizing the Binary, the Unitary and Beyond V. Identity, Sex and the Metaphysics of Substance VI. Language, Power and the Strategies of Displacement 2. Prohibition, Psychoanalysis, and the Production of the Heterosexual Matrix I. Structuralism's Critical Exchange II. Lacan, Riviere, and the Strategies of Masquerade III. Freud and the Melancholia of Gender IV. Gender Complexity and the Limits of Identification V. Reformulating Prohibition as Power 3. Subversive Bodily Acts I. The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva II. Foucault, Herculine, and the Politics of Sexual Discontinuity III. Monique Wittig - Bodily Disintegration and Fictive Sex IV. Bodily Inscriptions, Performative Subversions Conclusion - From Parody to Politics

1,125 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: A history of African slavery from the fifteenth to the early twentieth centuries examines how indigenous African slavery developed within an international context as discussed by the authors, and the impact of European abolition and assesses slavery's role in African history.
Abstract: This history of African slavery from the fifteenth to the early twentieth centuries examines how indigenous African slavery developed within an international context. Paul E. Lovejoy discusses the medieval Islamic slave trade and the Atlantic trade as well as the enslavement process and the marketing of slaves. He considers the impact of European abolition and assesses slavery's role in African history. The book corrects the accepted interpretation that African slavery was mild and resulted in the slaves' assimilation. Instead, slaves were used extensively in production, although the exploitation methods and the relationships to world markets differed from those in the Americas. Nevertheless, slavery in Africa, like slavery in the Americas, developed from its position on the periphery of capitalist Europe. This new edition revises all statistical material on the slave trade demography and incorporates recent research and an updated bibliography.

484 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the bibliography continues its customary coverage of secondary writings published since 1900 in western European languages on slavery or the slave trade anywhere in the world: monographs,...
Abstract: For 2015 the bibliography continues its customary coverage of secondary writings published since 1900 in western European languages on slavery or the slave trade anywhere in the world: monographs, ...

203 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Thomas Thurston1
TL;DR: For 2013, the bibliography continued its customary coverage of secondary writings published since 1900 in western European languages on slavery or the slave trade anywhere in the world: monographs as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: For 2013, the bibliography continues its customary coverage of secondary writings published since 1900 in western European languages on slavery or the slave trade anywhere in the world: monographs,...

193 citations