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Author

Marilyn D. McShane

Bio: Marilyn D. McShane is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Criminal justice & Conflict theories. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 9 publications receiving 346 citations.

Papers
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BookDOI
02 Aug 2004
TL;DR: Encyclopedia of American prisons, Encyclopedia of American Prison, the authors, http://www.encyclopediaofamericas prisons.org/en-americas-prison-reference.html
Abstract: Encyclopedia of American prisons , Encyclopedia of American prisons , کتابخانه دانشگاه امام صادق(ع)

33 citations

Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the origins of modern criminal science, and propose a new theory of criminal behavior based on the principles of Morals and Legislation. But they do not consider the social structure and anomie theory of crime.
Abstract: Section I: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MODERN CRIMINOLOGY CLASSICAL SCHOOL Cesare Beccaria On Crimes and Punishments CLASSICAL SCHOOL Jeremy Bentham Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation POSITIVE SCHOOL Cesare Lombroso Crime: Its Causes and Remedies Section II: THE CHICAGO SCHOOL AND DERIVATIVES ECOLOGICAL THEORY Clifford R. Shaw & Henry D. McKay Juvenile Delinquency and Urban Areas CULTURE CONFLICT THEORY Thorsten Sellin The Conflict of Conduct Norms DIFFERENTIAL ASSOCIATION THEORY Edwin H. Sutherland Differential Association SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY Ronald L. Akers A Social Learning Perspective on Deviant Behavior Section III: STRAIN AND SUBCULTURE THEORIES ANOMIE THEORY Robert K. Merton Social Structure and Anomie SUBCULTURE THEORY Albert K. Cohen Delinquent Boys DIFFERENTIAL OPPORTUNITY THEORY Richard A. Cloward & Lloyd E. Ohlin Delinquency and Opportunity FOCAL CONCERN THEORY Walter B. Miller Lower Class Culture as a Generating Milieu of Gang Delinquency Section IV: LABELING THEORY LABELING THEORY Howard S. Becker Outsiders LABELING THEORY Edwin M. Lemert Secondary Deviance Section V: CONFLICT THEORIES CONFLICT THEORY Richard Quinney The Social Reality of Crime CONFLICT THEORY Steven Spitzer Toward a Marxian Theory of Deviance CONFLICT THEORY Austin T. Turk Political Criminality Section VI: SOCIAL CONTROL THEORIES TECHNIQUES OF NEUTRALIZATION Gresham M. Sykes & David Matza Techniques of Neutralization CONTAINMENT THEORY Walter C. Reckless A New Theory of Delinquency and Crime SOCIAL CONTROL THEORY Travis Hirschi A Control Theory of Delinquency Section VII: CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVES ROUTINE ACTIVITY THEORY Lawrence E. Cohen & Marcus Felson A Routine Activity Approach FEMALE CRIMINALITY Dorie Klein The Etiology of Female Crime

27 citations

Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a collection of resources on Juvenile Justice for the Juvenile justice field, focusing on the following issues: 1) Juvenile criminal justice.2)
Abstract: Dedication Acknowledgements Preface Introduction Appendix: Print and Electronic Resources on Juvenile Justice

9 citations

Book
01 Jan 1997

8 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: This paper conducted a multisite study of juvenile drug courts to examine the ability of these courts to reduce recidivism and improve youth's social functioning, and to determine whether these programs use evidence-based practices in their treatment services.
Abstract: As an alternative to traditional juvenile courts, juvenile drug courts attempt to provide substance abuse treatment, sanctions, and incentives to rehabilitate nonviolent drug-involved youth, empower families to support them in this process, and prevent recidivism. The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) sponsored a multisite study of juvenile drug courts to examine the ability of these courts to reduce recidivism and improve youth’s social functioning, and to determine whether these programs use evidence-based practices in their treatment services. This bulletin provides an overview of the findings.

1,363 citations

01 Mar 2006
TL;DR: In an effort to better understand the lives and circumstances of students who drop out of high school and to help ground the research in the stories and reflections of the former students themselves, a series of focus groups and a survey were conducted of young people aged 16-25 who identified themselves as high school dropouts in 25 different locations throughout the United States as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: T here is a high school dropout epidemic in America. Each year, almost one third of all public high school students – and nearly one half of all blacks, Hispanics and Native Americans – fail to graduate from public high school with their class. Many of these students abandon school with less than two years to complete their high school education. This tragic cycle has not substantially improved during the past few decades when education reform has been high on the public agenda. During this time, the public has been almost entirely unaware of the severity of the dropout problem due to inaccurate data. The consequences remain tragic. The decision to drop out is a dangerous one for the student. Dropouts are much more likely than their peers who graduate to be unemployed, living in poverty, receiving public assistance, in prison, on death row, unhealthy, divorced, and single parents with children who drop out from high school themselves. Our communities and nation also suffer from the dropout epidemic due to the loss of productive workers and the higher costs associated with increased incarceration, health care and social services. Given the clear detrimental economic and personal costs to them, why do young people drop out of high school in such large numbers? Almost every elementary and middle school student reports ambitions that include high school graduation and at least some college. Why are so many dreams cut short? And what steps should be taken to turn the tide? In an effort to better understand the lives and circumstances of students who drop out of high school and to help ground the research in the stories and reflections of the former students themselves, a series of focus groups and a survey were conducted of young people aged 16-25 who identified themselves as high school dropouts in 25 different locations throughout the United States. These interviews took place in large cities, suburbs and small towns with high dropout rates. A primary purpose of this report is to approach the dropout problem from a perspective that has not been much considered in past studies – that of the students themselves. These efforts were designed to paint a more in-depth picture of who these young people are, why they dropped out of high school, and what might have helped them complete their high school education. We wanted to give their stories and insights a voice, …

961 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The cultural context of suicidal behavior among African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian American and Pacific Islander, and Latino adolescents, and the implications of these contexts for suicide prevention and treatment are discussed.
Abstract: Ethnic groups differ in rates of suicidal behaviors among youths, the context within which suicidal behavior occurs (e.g., different precipitants, vulnerability and protective factors, and reactions to suicidal behaviors), and patterns of help-seeking. In this article, the authors discuss the cultural context of suicidal behavior among African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian American and Pacific Islander, and Latino adolescents, and the implications of these contexts for suicide prevention and treatment. Several cross-cutting issues are discussed, including acculturative stress and protective factors within cultures; the roles of religion and spirituality and the family in culturally sensitive interventions; different manifestations and interpretations of distress in different cultures; and the impact of stigma and cultural distrust on help-seeking. The needs for culturally sensitive and community-based interventions are discussed, along with future opportunities for research in intervention development and evaluation.

474 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The article suggests that the courts, though in some ways appropriately solicitous of the plight of mentally ill supermax prisoners, have overlooked some of the broader psychological problems these units create.
Abstract: This article discusses the recent increase in the use of solitary-like confinement, especially the rise of so-called supermax prisons and the special mental health issues and challenges they pose. After briefly discussing the nature of these specialized and increasingly widespread units and the forces that have given rise to them, the article reviews some of the unique mental-health-related issues they present, including the large literature that exists on the negative psychological effects of isolation and the unusually high percentage of mentally ill prisoners who are confined there. It ends with a brief discussion of recent caselaw that addresses some of these mental health issues and suggests that the courts, though in some ways appropriately solicitous of the plight of mentally ill supermax prisoners, have overlooked some of the broader psychological problems these units create.

416 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For example, this paper reviewed a wide variety of possible explanations for these changes: demography, fertility and abortion legalization, economic prosperity, increased incarceration of offenders, increased agents of social intervention, changing social norms and practices, the dissipation of the social changes from the 1960s, and psychiatric pharmacology.
Abstract: Various forms of child maltreatment and child victimization declined as much as 40‐70% from 1993 until 2004, including sexual abuse, physical abuse, sexual assault, homicide, aggravated assault, robbery, and larceny. Other child welfare indicators also improved during the same period, including teen pregnancy, teen suicide, and children living in poverty. This article reviews a wide variety of possible explanations for these changes: demography, fertility and abortion legalization, economic prosperity, increased incarceration of offenders, increased agents of social intervention, changing social norms and practices, the dissipation of the social changes from the 1960s, and psychiatric pharmacology. Multiple factors probably contributed. In particular, economic prosperity, increasing agents of social intervention, and psychiatric pharmacology have advantages over some of the other explanations in accounting for the breadth and timing of the improvements. The worrisome stories about crimes against children that regularly fill the media have unfortunately obscured some more positive news from the statistical reports on these same offenses. Child victimization of various types has been declining since the early 1990s, in some cases declining dramatically. Facts about the Decline

388 citations