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Mario Polèse

Other affiliations: Université du Québec
Bio: Mario Polèse is an academic researcher from Institut national de la recherche scientifique. The author has contributed to research in topics: Population & Location theory. The author has an hindex of 23, co-authored 109 publications receiving 1890 citations. Previous affiliations of Mario Polèse include Université du Québec.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 2006
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present the case of five Canadian peripheral regions, which they argue are destined to decline and explain the reasons why future decline (in absolute population and employment numbers) is inevitable.
Abstract: . The authors present the case of five Canadian peripheral regions, which they argue are destined to decline. The explanation of the reasons why future decline (in absolute population and employment numbers) is inevitable constitutes the article’s central focus. The authors suggest that regional decline will become an increasingly common occurrence in nations at the end of the demographic transition whose economic geographies display centre-periphery relationships. Such broad structural trends cannot be easily altered by public policy. The authors reflect on the implications of regional decline for the formulation of local economic development strategies. Local economic development strategies should not, they argue, be advanced as a means of arresting population and employment decline. To suggest that the regions studied in this article will decline because of a lack of social capital or insufficient number of local entrepreneurs, is not only misleading but may also be counterproductive.

143 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, the potential utility of local development as an effective element of regional development policy is examined, emphasizing the emergence of local entrepreneurship and the role of the State in stimulating local initiatives.
Abstract: Coffey W. J. and Polese M. (1985) Local development: conceptual bases and policy implications, Reg. Studies 19, 85–93. Although local development is frequently cited as an option within the broader context of regional policy, the concept remains vague. The bases of the local development approach lie in its complementarity with three traditional pillars of regional theory and policy: capital and infrastructure policies; migration as an adjustment mechanism; and growth centre strategies. In examining the potential utility of local development as an effective element of regional development policy, we emphasize the emergence of local entrepreneurship and the role of the State in stimulating local initiatives. Local development policy may be generalized in terms of three options involving financial assistance, access to information, and social animation.

131 citations

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TL;DR: A review of the arguments for and against the Jacobs hypothesis can be found in this paper, where the authors argue that the socioeconomic processes that explain economic growth operate primarily at the national/societal level and not at the city level.
Abstract: The idea that cities are sources of economic growth, generally associated with Jane Jacobs, has gained ground in the scholarly literature in recent years This essay proposes a review of the arguments for and against the Jacobs hypothesis Much of the debate centres on the existence of dynamic agglomeration economies It is difficult, it is argued to rigorously test the relationship between agglomeration and economic growth Part of the problem stems from the difficulty of distinguishing factors that allow cities to capture a greater share of national economic growth from those that allow cities to add to national economic growth It is argued that the socioeconomic processes that explain economic growth operate primarily at the national/societal level and not at the city level

127 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a model for comparing industrial location patterns over time, applied to Canadian data for 1971 and 1996, is presented, where the authors consider the possible impact of information technology on location.
Abstract: This article presents a model for comparing industrial location patterns over time, applied to Canadian data for 1971 and 1996. The Canadian economy is divided into eighteen industrial sectors (manufacturing and services), of which eight are examined in detail. The analysis addresses several questions. Do observed location models for given industries follow predictable patterns? How stable are those patterns over time? Has the relative sensitivity to “distance” of given industries changed over time? Can significant breaks in location patterns be observed over time? The authors consider the possible impact of information technology on location. If “distance is dying,” as is sometimes argued, this should be reflected in changing location patterns. The results show a high degree of stability over time, suggesting that distance is still very much alive.

105 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1989
TL;DR: In this paper, four issues related to the location of producer services are used to critically examine this notion: (1) observed centralization and decentralization trends, (2) the influence of corporate ownership and control, (3) intrafirm functional separation, and (4) the impact of telecommunications technology.
Abstract: There is a certain optimism among policy makers concering the ability of producer services, viewed as locationally flexible, to stimulate economic growth in lagging regions. Four issues related to the location of producer services are used to critically examine this notion: (1) observed centralization and decentralization trends, (2) the influence of corporate ownership and control, (3) intrafirm functional separation, and (4) the impact of telecommunications technology. Producer service growth has not benefited central and peripheral regions equally. The empirical and conceptual evidence presented suggests that these activities have little positive impact upon lagging regions. Some essential elements of a regional strategy involving producer services are proposed.

92 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an equilibrium theory of local externalities that can explain the empirical size distribution of cities is proposed, and the driving force is a random productivity process of local economies and the perfect mobility of workers.
Abstract: Two empirical regularities concerning the size distribution of cities have repeatedly been established: Zipf's law holds (the upper tail is Pareto), and city growth is proportionate Census 2000 data are used covering the entire size distribution, not just the upper tail The nontruncated distribution is shown to be lognormal, rather than Pareto This provides a simple justification for the coexistence of proportionate growth and the resulting lognormal distribution An equilibrium theory of local externalities that can explain the empirical size distribution of cities is proposed The driving force is a random productivity process of local economies and the perfect mobility of workers

784 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors consider the history of the idea that knowledge is an economic factor, and discuss the question of whether regions provide the relevant system of reference for knowledge-based economic development.
Abstract: In this introduction the editors showcase the papers by way of a structured project and seek to clarify the two key concepts cited in the title. We consider the history of the idea that knowledge is an economic factor, and discuss the question of whether regions provide the relevant system of reference for knowledge-based economic development. Current transformations in university-industry-government relations at various levels can be considered as a metamorphosis in industry organization. The concept of constructed advantage will be elaborated. The various papers arising from a conference on this subject hosted by Memorial University, Newfoundland, Canada are approached from this perspective.

495 citations

01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: The potential switch from production in traditional extensive grazing areas to intensive modern agriculture provides opportunities to significantly increase food production while sparing land for nature conservation in Latin America as mentioned in this paper, which is a combination of emerging threats and opportunities requires changes in the way the conservation of Latin American ecosystems is approached.
Abstract: Current socioeconomic drivers of land-use change associated with globalization are producing two contrasting land-use trends in Latin America. Increasing global food demand (particularly in Southeast Asia) accelerates deforestation in areas suitable for modern agriculture (e.g., soybean), severely threatening ecosystems, such as Amazonian rain forests, dry forests, and subtropical grasslands. Additionally, in the coming decades, demand for biofuels may become an emerging threat. In contrast, high yields in modern agricultural systems and rural-urban migration coupled with remittances promote the abandonment of marginal agricultural lands, thus favoring ecosystem recovery on mountains, deserts, and areas of poor soils, while improving human well-being. The potential switch from production in traditional extensive grazing areas to intensive modern agriculture provides opportunities to significantly increase food production while sparing land for nature conservation. This combination of emerging threats and opportunities requires changes in the way the conservation of Latin American ecosystems is approached. Land-use efficiency should be analyzed beyond the local-based paradigm that drives most conservation programs, and focus on large geographic scales involving long-distance fluxes of products, information, and people in order to maximize both agricultural production and the conservation of environmental services.

350 citations