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Mariusz Panczyk

Bio: Mariusz Panczyk is an academic researcher from Medical University of Warsaw. The author has contributed to research in topics: Medicine & Evidence-based practice. The author has an hindex of 11, co-authored 157 publications receiving 695 citations. Previous affiliations of Mariusz Panczyk include Medical University of Łódź & Laboratory of Molecular Biology.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review is a synthetic presentation of drug resistance in the context of CRC patient chemotherapy and aims to increase the percentage of positive treatment response in CRC patients due to practical applications of pharmacogenetics/pharmacogenomics.
Abstract: During the past two decades the first sequencing of the human genome was performed showing its high degree of inter-individual differentiation, as a result of large international research projects (Human Genome Project, the 1000 Genomes Project International HapMap Project, and Programs for Genomic Applications NHLBI-PGA). This period was also a time of intensive development of molecular biology techniques and enormous knowledge growth in the biology of cancer. For clinical use in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), in addition to fluoropyrimidines, another two new cytostatic drugs were allowed: irinotecan and oxaliplatin. Intensive research into new treatment regimens and a new generation of drugs used in targeted therapy has also been conducted. The last 20 years was a time of numerous in vitro and in vivo studies on the molecular basis of drug resistance. One of the most important factors limiting the effectiveness of chemotherapy is the primary and secondary resistance of cancer cells. Understanding the genetic factors and mechanisms that contribute to the lack of or low sensitivity of tumour tissue to cytostatics is a key element in the currently developing trend of personalized medicine. Scientists hope to increase the percentage of positive treatment response in CRC patients due to practical applications of pharmacogenetics/pharmacogenomics. Over the past 20 years the clinical usability of different predictive markers has been tested among which only a few have been confirmed to have high application potential. This review is a synthetic presentation of drug resistance in the context of CRC patient chemotherapy. The multifactorial nature and volume of the issues involved do not allow the author to present a comprehensive study on this subject in one review.

112 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The data indicate that the MDR1 C3435T SNP may carry an increased risk of developing B-CLL, possibly by virtue of decreased protection against P-gp-substrate carcinogens.

56 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Differences in ABCB11236C>T and ABCB12677G>T/A genotypes and T1236 allele distribution between investigated populations indicate significant impact of these SNPs on risk of development of colorectal cancer.
Abstract: Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the significance of three most common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ABCB1 gene in the development of colorectal cancer and to estimate the influence of these SNPs to surviving patients' treatment combination adjuvant therapy 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin. Haplotype structure of ABCB1 was analysed, and degree of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between SNPs of ABCB1 was estimated.

54 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Differences in haplotype distributions and degree of clinical staging may suggest that some other potential SNPs, especially in regulatory region of ABCB1/MDR1 gene, may influence P-glycoprotein function and CRC progression.
Abstract: Objective To analyse the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): ABCB11236C>T, ABCB12677G>T/A, ABCB13435C>T and haplotypes in the ABCB1/MDR1 gene, which could contribute to genetic risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Disease association between the ABCB1/MDR1 genotype, allele, haplotype frequencies and histological features, such as TNM classification, localization of primary carcinoma, grade of malignancy, histological type of tumour, lymphoid infiltration and vessel invasion were estimated. In this study, the potential role of SNPs of the ABCB1/MDR1 gene as a prognostic marker for CRC was analysed.

48 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 2005-Ejso
TL;DR: The combined measurement of both the gene and its protein product, is an important contribution to the study of molecular markers in histological material.
Abstract: Aims To report the expression of cyclin D1 protein and its gene in a series of colorectal adenocarcinoma. Methods One hundred and eleven specimens of colorectal carcinomas and adjacent normal colorectal mucosa were investigated by staining with a monoclonal antibody against cyclin D1 and by RT-PCR. Results Expression of CCND1 gene was found in 54 out of 111 cases of colorectal cancers, while in normal mucosa the expression of this gene was not observed. Cyclin D1 protein expression was checked in the same group of adenocarcinoma cases. Presence of this protein was observed in 69 cases and for 43 of them also expression of its gene was found. Dependence between the presence of protein and the gene expression was statistically significant ( p =0.0002). In the group of cases where CCND1 gene expression was detected, high level of its protein expression was found in 20 cases. The CCND1 gene expression was associated with metastases to lymph nodes ( p =0.0181) and also with distant metastasis ( p =0.0204). Conclusions The combined measurement of both the gene and its protein product, is an important contribution to the study of molecular markers in histological material.

34 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: These standards of care are intended to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payors, and other interested individuals with the components of diabetes care, treatment goals, and tools to evaluate the quality of care.
Abstract: XI. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING DIABETES CARE D iabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuing medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications. Diabetes care is complex and requires that many issues, beyond glycemic control, be addressed. A large body of evidence exists that supports a range of interventions to improve diabetes outcomes. These standards of care are intended to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payors, and other interested individuals with the components of diabetes care, treatment goals, and tools to evaluate the quality of care. While individual preferences, comorbidities, and other patient factors may require modification of goals, targets that are desirable for most patients with diabetes are provided. These standards are not intended to preclude more extensive evaluation and management of the patient by other specialists as needed. For more detailed information, refer to Bode (Ed.): Medical Management of Type 1 Diabetes (1), Burant (Ed): Medical Management of Type 2 Diabetes (2), and Klingensmith (Ed): Intensive Diabetes Management (3). The recommendations included are diagnostic and therapeutic actions that are known or believed to favorably affect health outcomes of patients with diabetes. A grading system (Table 1), developed by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and modeled after existing methods, was utilized to clarify and codify the evidence that forms the basis for the recommendations. The level of evidence that supports each recommendation is listed after each recommendation using the letters A, B, C, or E.

9,618 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The learning to teach in higher education is universally compatible with any devices to read, so you can get the most less latency time to download any of the authors' books like this one.
Abstract: Thank you for reading learning to teach in higher education. As you may know, people have look numerous times for their favorite books like this learning to teach in higher education, but end up in infectious downloads. Rather than enjoying a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon, instead they cope with some infectious bugs inside their laptop. learning to teach in higher education is available in our digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can get it instantly. Our book servers spans in multiple countries, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one. Kindly say, the learning to teach in higher education is universally compatible with any devices to read.

1,332 citations

16 Jun 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors give an overview of the current understanding of Type 1 diabetes and potential future directions for research and care, and discuss the current state of the art in this area.
Abstract: Summary Type 1 diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disease characterised by insulin deficiency and resultant hyperglycaemia. Knowledge of type 1 diabetes has rapidly increased over the past 25 years, resulting in a broad understanding about many aspects of the disease, including its genetics, epidemiology, immune and β-cell phenotypes, and disease burden. Interventions to preserve β cells have been tested, and several methods to improve clinical disease management have been assessed. However, wide gaps still exist in our understanding of type 1 diabetes and our ability to standardise clinical care and decrease disease-associated complications and burden. This Seminar gives an overview of the current understanding of the disease and potential future directions for research and care.

1,326 citations

01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: In this article, Aviles et al. present a review of the state of the art in the field of test data analysis, which includes the following institutions: Stanford University, Stanford Graduate School of Education, Stanford University and the University of Southern California.
Abstract: EDITORIAL BOARD Robert Davison Aviles, Bradley University Harley E. Baker, California State University–Channel Islands Jean-Guy Blais, Universite de Montreal, Canada Catherine Y. Chang, Georgia State University Robert C. Chope, San Francisco State University Kevin O. Cokley, University of Missouri, Columbia Patricia B. Elmore, Southern Illinois University Shawn Fitzgerald, Kent State University John J. Fremer, Educational Testing Service Vicente Ponsoda Gil, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain Jo-Ida C. Hansen, University of Minnesota Charles C. Healy, University of California at Los Angeles Robin K. Henson, University of North Texas Flaviu Adrian Hodis, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand Janet K. Holt, Northern Illinois University David A. Jepsen, The University of Iowa Gregory Arief D. Liem, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University Wei-Cheng J. Mau, Wichita State University Larry Maucieri, Governors State College Patricia Jo McDivitt, Data Recognition Corporation Peter F. Merenda, University of Rhode Island Matthew J. Miller, University of Maryland Ralph O. Mueller, University of Hartford Jane E. Myers, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro Philip D. Parker, University of Western Sydney Ralph L. Piedmont, Loyola College in Maryland Alex L. Pieterse, University at Albany, SUNY Nicholas J. Ruiz, Winona State University James P. Sampson, Jr., Florida State University William D. Schafer, University of Maryland, College Park William E. Sedlacek, University of Maryland, College Park Marie F. Shoffner, University of Virginia Len Sperry, Florida Atlantic University Kevin Stoltz, University of Mississippi Jody L. Swartz-Kulstad, Seton Hall University Bruce Thompson, Texas A&M University Timothy R. Vansickle, Minnesota Department of Education Steve Vensel, Palm Beach Atlantic University Dan Williamson, Lindsey Wilson College F. Robert Wilson, University of Cincinnati

1,306 citations