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Mark A. C. Summers

Bio: Mark A. C. Summers is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Improvisation & Creative work. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 4 citations.

Papers
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Dissertation
01 Jun 2018
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined their own improvisatory practice on the viola da gamba and its augmentation with mixed-music computer systems, and explored augmenting this practice with systems, looking in detail at my performances with gruntCount by Martin Parker, Laminate by myself and derivations by Ben Carey.
Abstract: This thesis examines my improvisatory practice on the viola da gamba and its augmentation with mixed-music computer systems. It comprises creative work and an extended written commentary and discussion. My creative work is presented in two albums of music – solo viola da gamba improvisation, and viola da gamba and mixed-music computer systems – and supplementary recorded material. The written commentary looks in depth at the presented creative work. I use the first, solo album to examine my improvisatory practice. To explore augmenting this practice with systems, I look in detail at my performances with gruntCount by Martin Parker, Laminate by myself and derivations by Ben Carey. Examples of these performances are presented in the second album. Scrutiny of these three systems leads to extended discussion of the following topics: 1. Taxonomy: What are these systems? What are the characteristics they display? Do these systems fit into a standard classification scheme? 2. Ontology: Do performances with these systems instantiate musical works? What are the criteria that would help us to decide? How much of my practice is therefore underpinned by musical works? 3. Copyright: Who is responsible for the musical output with these systems? Who is a legal/musical author in such performances? To conclude, I compare my improvisatory practice with and without systems and identify learnings arising from this research.

4 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI

49 citations

01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: Cass Cassidy and Einbond as discussed by the authors discuss the role of noise as musical material, as form, sound, notation or interface, as a medium for listening, as provocation, as data.
Abstract: Noise In and As Music Cassidy, Aaron and Einbond, Aaron (2013) Noise in and as music. University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield. ISBN 978-1-86218-118-2 The book’s focus is the practice of noise and its relationship to music, and in particular the role of noise as musical material—as form, as sound, as notation or interface, as a medium for listening, as provocation, as data

5 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In early June, British diplomats had spent the past three months fretting over the Shackleton report and preparing for negotiations with Argentina as mentioned in this paper, and were suddenly presented with an opportunity to buy some much-needed time, and also allow officials to explain and put the gloss on the troublesome report.
Abstract: British diplomats had spent the past three months fretting over the Shackleton report and preparing for negotiations with Argentina. In early June they were suddenly presented with an opportunity. With ambassadorial relations not yet restored, John Shakespeare was still the FCO’s man in Buenos Aires. There, he was told by the MFA political director that the government was willing to hold official talks, as a prelude to a ministerial meeting. This offered two advantages for the Foreign Office. It would not only buy some much-needed time, but also allow officials to explain and ‘put the gloss’ on the troublesome report.1 Carless recommended accepting the offer for talks, scheduled for Paris. The MFA had proposed the French capital because it was sending a large delegation there for an Antarctic meeting. Following the government reshuffle in March, Tony Crosland had not found time to focus on the Falklands question. The shipbuilding nationalisation bill and Icelandic Cod War settlement had produced a climate in which the government was reluctant to take on another politically emotive problem.2 ‘Even if this is the month for grasping long outstanding nettles, I do not think we can afford to be stung too many times too quickly’, Rowlands advised the foreign secretary.3 As a result, Crosland told Shakespeare that the Paris talks should be ‘as informal and free-ranging as possible’. He sought an ‘across-the-board’ dialogue with Argentina, similar to those conducted with other Latin American countries. This would involve talks on regional security, fisheries development, oil, the Law of the Sea and nuclear non-proliferation. Crosland also suggested inviting the Argentine delegation to visit London after the discussions.4

2 citations