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Mark E. Neely

Bio: Mark E. Neely is an academic researcher from Pennsylvania State University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Spanish Civil War & Politics. The author has an hindex of 12, co-authored 31 publications receiving 453 citations. Previous affiliations of Mark E. Neely include University of Texas at Austin & University of Reading.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1991
TL;DR: The Fate of Liberty as mentioned in this paper provides a comprehensive look at the issues of civil liberties during Abraham Lincoln's administration, placing them firmly in the political context of the time, and provides a vivid picture of the crises and chaos of a nation at war with itself.
Abstract: If Abraham Lincoln was known as the Great Emancipator, he was also the only president to suspend the writ of habeas corpus. Indeed, Lincoln's record on the Constitution and individual rights has fueled a century of debate, from charges that Democrats were singled out for harrassment to Gore Vidal's depiction of Lincoln as an "absolute dictator." Now, in The Fate of Liberty, one of America's leading authorities on Lincoln wades straight into this controversy, showing just who was jailed and why, even as he explores the whole range of Lincoln's constitutional policies. Mark Neely depicts Lincoln's suspension of habeas corpus as a well-intentioned attempt to deal with a floodtide of unforeseen events: the threat to Washington as Maryland flirted with secession, distintegrating public order in the border states, corruption among military contractors, the occupation of hostile Confederate territory, contraband trade with the South, and the outcry against the first draft in U.S. history. Drawing upon letters from prisoners, records of military courts and federal prisons, memoirs, and federal archives, he paints a vivid picture of how Lincoln responded to these problems, how his policies were actually executed, and the virulent political debates that followed. Lincoln emerges from this account with this legendary statesmanship intact--mindful of political realities and prone to temper the sentences of military courts, concerned not with persecuting his opponents but with prosecuting the war efficiently. In addition, Neely explores the abuses of power under the regime of martial law: the routine torture of suspected deserters, widespread antisemitism among Union generals and officials, the common practice of seizing civilian hostages. He finds that though the system of military justice was flawed, it suffered less from merciless zeal, or political partisanship, than from inefficiency and the friction and complexities of modern war. Drawing on a deep understanding of this unique period, Neely takes a comprehensive look at the issues of civil liberties during Lincoln's administration, placing them firmly in the political context of the time. Written with keen insight and an intimate grasp of the original sources, The Fate of Liberty offers a vivid picture of the crises and chaos of a nation at war with itself, changing our understanding of this president and his most controversial policies.

106 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

45 citations

Book
30 Nov 2007
TL;DR: The Civil War is often portrayed as the most brutal war in America's history, a premonition of 20th-century slaughter and carnage as mentioned in this paper. But Neely, Jr. considers the war's destructiveness in a comparative context, revealing the sense of limits that guided the conduct of American soldiers and statesmen.
Abstract: The Civil War is often portrayed as the most brutal war in America's history, a premonition of 20th-century slaughter and carnage In challenging this view, Mark E Neely, Jr, considers the war's destructiveness in a comparative context, revealing the sense of limits that guided the conduct of American soldiers and statesmenNeely begins by contrasting Civil War behaviour with US soldiers' experiences in the Mexican War of 1846 He examines Price's Raid in Missouri for evidence of deterioration in the restraints imposed by the customs of war; and in a brilliant analysis of Philip Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley campaign, he shows that the actions of US cavalrymen were selective and controlled The Mexican war of the 1860s between French imperial forces and republicans provided a new yardstick for brutality: Emperor Maximilian's infamous Black Decree threatened captured enemies with execution Civil War battles, however, paled in comparison with the unrestrained warfare waged against the Plains Indians Racial beliefs, Neely shows, were a major determinant of wartime behaviourDestructive rhetoric was rampant in the congressional debate over the resolution to avenge the treatment of Union captives at Andersonville by deliberately starving and freezing to death Confederate prisoners of war Nevertheless, to gauge the events of the war by the ferocity of its language of political hatred is a mistake, Neely argues The modern overemphasis on violence in Civil War literature has led many scholars to go too far in drawing close analogies with the 20th century's "total war" and the grim guerrilla struggles of Vietnam

39 citations

Book
22 Apr 2002
TL;DR: In this article, the story of political conflict in the North during the Civil War is described, examining party conflict, party patronage, wartime elections, and the role of the loyal opposition.
Abstract: This text recounts the story of political conflict in the North during the Civil War. Examining party conflict, party patronage, wartime elections, and the role of the loyal opposition, it dismantles the argument that the survival of the party system in the North contributed to its victory.

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The only complete encyclopedia about Abraham Lincoln is the Abraham Lincoln Encyclopedia as mentioned in this paper, which is the first place to look whenever you need information about Lincoln, his times, his ideas, or his contemporaries.
Abstract: Despite the enormous number of books written about Abraham Lincolnsome seven thousand to datethis encyclopedia stands alone in its field. The only Lincoln encyclopedia in print, it's the first place to look whenever you need information about Lincoln, his times, his ideas, or his contemporaries. } Among the many novel features of this volume: *It carefully examines Lincoln's views on a wide variety of subjectseconomics, race, the Constitution, Indians, patronage, habeas corpus , and dozens more. *It offers biographical sketches of members of Lincoln's family and describes how he felt about them, including his "rebel" sister-in-law and an enterprising cousin who used Lincoln's Presidential nomination to launch a flourishing souvenir business. *It portrays and clearly captures scores of Lincoln's associates, assistants, colleagues, and enemiesfrom Charles Francis Adams and George Atzerodt to Fernando Wood and Richard Yates. *It appraises all the major Lincoln biographers and their books and also covers others associated with the subject: collectors and collections, portrait painters and photographers, famous documents and sites.. }

27 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: A comparative performance analysis of artificial Neural networks, MDA and chance showed that artificial neural networks predict better in both training and testing phases, and are promising as an alternative to traditional analytic tools like MDA.
Abstract: Stimulated by recent high-profile incidents, concerns about business ethics have increased over the last decade. In response, research has focused on developing theoretical and empirical frameworks to understand ethical decision making. So far, empirical studies have used traditional quantitative tools, such as regression or multiple discriminant analysis (MDA), in ethics research. More advanced tools are needed. In this exploratory research, a new approach to classifying, categorizing and analyzing ethical decision situations is presented. A comparative performance analysis of artificial neural networks, MDA and chance showed that artificial neural networks predict better in both training and testing phases. While some limitations of this approach were noted, in the field of business ethics, such networks are promising as an alternative to traditional analytic tools like MDA.

217 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Thomas Thurston1
TL;DR: For 2013, the bibliography continued its customary coverage of secondary writings published since 1900 in western European languages on slavery or the slave trade anywhere in the world: monographs as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: For 2013, the bibliography continues its customary coverage of secondary writings published since 1900 in western European languages on slavery or the slave trade anywhere in the world: monographs,...

193 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this view, a Hobson's choice between anarchy and hierarchy is not necessary because an intermediary structure, here dubbed "negarchy" is also available as mentioned in this paper, which is a theory of security that is superior to realism because it addresses not only threats of war from other states but also the threat of despotism at home.
Abstract: A rediscovery of the long-forgotten republican version of liberal political theory has arresting implications for the theory and practice of international relations. Republican liberalism has a theory of security that is superior to realism, because it addresses not only threats of war from other states but also the threat of despotism at home. In this view, a Hobson's choice between anarchy and hierarchy is not necessary because an intermediary structure, here dubbed “negarchy,” is also available. The American Union from 1787 until 1861 is a historical example. This Philadelphian system was not a real state since, for example, the union did not enjoy a monopoly of legitimate violence. Yet neither was it a state system, since the American states lacked sufficient autonomy. While it shared some features with the Westphalian system such as balance of power, it differed fundamentally. Its origins owed something to particular conditions of time and place, and the American Civil War ended this system. Yet close analysis indicates that it may have surprising relevance for the future of contemporary issues such as the European Union and nuclear governance.

178 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Miller as mentioned in this paper has worked on the development of this bibliography since 1977, with the assistance of many colleagues and the institutional support of the University of Virginia* and the 2004 annual...
Abstract: Joseph C. Miller has worked on the development of this bibliography since 1977, with the assistance of many colleagues and the institutional support of the University of Virginia.* The 2004 annual ...

140 citations

DissertationDOI
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: The role of Mexican actors in attracting, resisting and altering U.S. informal imperialism was examined in this paper, where the authors examined the role of Mexico's government, dissident priests and liberal exiles in the Mexican Revolution.
Abstract: This dissertation examines U.S. views of Mexico from the end of the U.S.-Mexico War in 1848, to the end of the first phase of the Mexican Revolution in May 1911. During this period numerous Americans saw Mexico as a laboratory to test their ability to transform a country seemingly in need of guidance. Americans, however, struggled to define the role of the United States: whether it was solely to be a model for other nations to follow, or whether Americans should be actively involved in this process. In the years after the U.S. Civil War, a diverse group of Americans, especially missionaries, investors, and working-class activists, saw Mexico as a nation in need of change and sought to affect its transformation through the means of informal imperialism. Yet they vigorously disagreed whether this transformation should occur in religious, political, economic or social terms. Despite these differences, they all believed that Mexico could be reshaped in the image of the United States. Their views thus provided a powerful counternarrative to persistent U.S. images of the Mexican people as irredeemable because of allegedly inherent inferiorities based on race, religion or culture. The dissertation also examines the role of Mexican actors in attracting, resisting and altering U.S. informal imperialism. These Mexican actors included government officials who petitioned for U.S. assistance during the French Intervention (1862-67) and the Porfiriato (1876-1911); dissident Catholic priests who requested aid for the fledgling Protestant movement in Mexico; and Mexican liberal exiles from the repressive Diaz regime, who sought U.S. support in bringing a democratic government to Mexico.

115 citations