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Author

Mark M. Anderson

Bio: Mark M. Anderson is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Holocaust. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 30 citations.
Topics: The Holocaust

Papers
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Journal Article
TL;DR: This article pointed out that the role of the child victim in the representation of the Holocaust, especially in mainstream American life, can also distort, personalize, and de-historicize the Holocaust.
Abstract: This article points to the key role of the child victim in the representation of the Holocaust, especially in mainstream American life. Developing Peter Novick's claim that the Holocaust has been transformed into an "American memory," the author notes that virtually all breakthrough moments in non-Jewish American awareness of the Holocaust (The Diary of Anne Frank, Wiesel's Night, the NBC television movie Holocaust, Spielberg's Schindler's List, the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. ) have highlighted the role of children, whose defenselessness serves as a metaphor for the general plight of Holocaust victims. While rhetorically effective, the figure of the child victim can also distort, personalize, and dehistoricize the Holocaust, providing a false sense of solidarity and understanding in mainstream American audiences.

30 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: The authors concludes that the Holocaust industry has become an outright extortion racket and that those who exploit the tragedy of the Holocaust for their own personal political and financial gain can be easily identified and identified.
Abstract: Thoroughly researched, this is a disturbing and powerful argument indicting with rigour and honesty those who exploit the tragedy of the Holocaust for their own personal political and financial gain. It concludes that the Holocaust industry has become an outright extortion racket. The new edition includes updated material discussing the initial reception to the books publication.

133 citations

DOI
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, the state and public and the destiny of synagogues, Jewish cemeteries and Jewish buildings in the Czech lands (Soa years 1945-1956) are discussed.
Abstract: ion from the complex economic and political systems in which they occurred. I consider 74 For example, see Blanka Soukupová “Poměr státu a veřejnosti k osudu synagog, židovských hřbitovů židovský budov v Českýych zemích po šoa (léta 1945-1956) [The state and public and the destiny of synagogues, Jewish cemeteries and Jewish buildings in the Czech lands (Soa years 1945-1956) (trans. in original)], Slovenský národopis, no. 2 (2012): 133-50. For a more nuanced approach that has influenced my own work, see Michael Meng, Shattered Spaces: Encountering Jewish Ruins in Postwar Germany and Poland (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011).

31 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined the relation between memory, social media experience, and testimony in the Eva Stories Instagram project by conducting a combined visual and multimodal analysis of the stories.
Abstract: This study examines the relations between memory, social media experience, and testimony in the Eva Stories Instagram project. By conducting a combined visual and multimodal analysis of the stories...

25 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: This paper identified unifying themes across the texts that show how the child's viewpoint offers a distinct perspective on the historical event, depicts an underrepresented experience, and provides the potential for new understandings on the Holocaust.
Abstract: This thesis argues that there is a subgenre within Holocaust literature of survivors writing from the child's perspective. Both the survivor’s novel and children occupy multiple spaces, which provides a unique vantage point from which to represent the Holocaust. There are three key attributes of the primary texts within my subgenre: they are all considered novels, their authors are classified as Holocaust survivors, and they have child protagonists. I have identified unifying themes across the texts that show how the child’s viewpoint offers a distinct perspective on the historical event, depicts an underrepresented experience, and provides the potential for new understandings on the Holocaust. Each chapter focuses on one theme, examining how each author uses the child's perspective across disparate genders, ages, geographical locations, and traumatic experiences, which implies that this subgenre is making critical assertions about the Holocaust and the Jewish child’s experience. Chapter One focuses on the dichotomy between children and adults, examining the interactions between and actions of their child protagonists with adult characters. In this way, authors underscore the end of childhood in extremity, a loss for both children prematurely killed or who must prematurely develop, as well as the loss of traditional functions of adults by inverting concepts of dependents and guardians. The second chapter briefly explores the way the novels use child’s play to highlight the aforementioned changed nature of childhood. Despite often assuming adult responsibilities and attitudes as described in the first chapter, traditional childhood activities can serve to contrast the brutality and hardship with their inherent innocence. Chapter Three explores the novel’s representations of a three-fold identity, which signifies how the protagonists' sense of themselves during the experience is shaped by their positions as an outsider, Jewishness, and gender. The fourth chapter examines how these narratives reconstruct the concept of place, give it meaning, and represent it by creating a Holocaust ‘child-space’ for its youngest experiencers. The child-space is represented by several qualities, including: liminal and paradoxical spaces such as rural and urban settings; specific sites of meaning and concepts of home; belonging to nation states and cities; and the narrative spaces that the authors create. Analyzing these novels through the patterns that develop between different characters and narratives may impact debates about the portrayal of the childhood self in all writing, as well as contribute to discussions of the Holocaust beyond the child’s experience. The fictional child’s viewpoint could address some of the questions that are raised by the ethical concerns about imaginative Holocaust representation and the limits of language, suggesting that it is a form to be considered for thinking about the endurance of Holocaust narratives.

15 citations