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Mark Roxburgh

Bio: Mark Roxburgh is an academic researcher from University of Newcastle. The author has contributed to research in topics: Design education & Learning theory. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 24 publications receiving 73 citations. Previous affiliations of Mark Roxburgh include Information Technology University & University of Technology, Sydney.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The nature of the images of design is interrogated and it is argued that because they are largely technical and increasingly ubiquitous – that is they are available to anyone with a camera phone, a computer and design software – that the authors are witnessing the erasure of the imaginary by the image.
Abstract: Merleau-Ponty argues that perception is not merely the passive reception of visual data but an embodied, imaginative, and transformative experience. What is transformed through embodied perception is the perceiver of the world and the world perceived, in short our sense of reality. From this we can imagine the world as being fundamentally abstract, artificial and manipulable. This obviously raises questions about the nature of the realm of the material, of what we might call concrete reality. For design this appears untenable for though the perception of the world as-it-might-be functions on an abstract level, the changes we make are based upon our embodied experience of the world as-weperceive-it. These changes then become operational at an apparent material, concrete, level. As design activity is concerned with transforming the world, quite literally in material form, this leads to design being imagined as the creation of the artificial world. In this paper I seek firstly to draw upon these parallel concerns with the imaginative and the artificial by examining the central role that the image plays in both. I will specifically interrogate the nature of the images of design and argue that because they are largely technical and increasingly ubiquitous – that is they are available to anyone with a camera phone, a computer and design software – that we are witnessing the erasure of the imaginary by the image. I will conclude by speculating on how we might resist such conditions.

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors reviewed learning and assessment in an apparently unrelated field, and provided an opportunity to bring a different perspective and enable appropriate challenge of the current approaches in anatomy.
Abstract: Medical and healthcare practice is likely to see fundamental changes in the future that will require a different approach to the way in which we educate, train and assess the next generation of healthcare professionals. The anatomical sciences will need to be part of that challenge so they continue to play a full role in preparing students with the knowledge and ever increasingly the skills and competencies that will contribute to the fundamentals of their future capacity to practice effectively. Although there have been significant advances in the anatomical science pedagogy, by reviewing learning and assessment in an apparently unrelated field, provides an opportunity to bring a different perspective and enable appropriate challenge of the current approaches in anatomy. Design learning has had to continually reimagine itself in response to the shifting landscape in design practice and the threats associated with technology and societal change. Design learning has also long used a student-centric active pedagogy and allied authentic assessment methods and therefore provides an ideal case study to help inform future changes required in anatomical learning and assessment.

7 citations

01 Jan 2007
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors reflect upon efforts to build a bridge between theory and practice through design theory curriculum using visual mapping tools drawn from constructivist education theory and explore the efficacy of these efforts through both quantitative and qualitative student feedback.
Abstract: Strickler argues that the growth of visual communication as an academic discipline can only occur if there is an “empirical bridge between theory and practice” (1999: 38). Such a bridge is also a precondition for the evolution of visual communication as a forward looking and reflective industry as opposed to one that simply responds to the dictates of the market. However, building this bridge is no easy task; visually articulate and practically oriented students are reluctant to engage with theories that may challenge their passionately held understandings of design. All the more so when the commonest mode such inquiry is conducted through is reading and writing. The challenges and problems of writing for visual thinkers has been well articulated by Grow (1994). That such students are resistant to forms that they are generally not well equipped for or confident in is hardly surprising. Couple this with a seemingly near universal questioning of the relevance of theory by aspiring practitioners and it would seem the odds are stacked against such an enterprise. In this paper we will reflect upon efforts to build this bridge through design theory curriculum using visual mapping tools drawn from constructivist education theory. The efficacy of these efforts is explored through both quantitative and qualitative student feedback.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a series of changes involving collaboration, visualisation and audience presentation were incrementally added to a first year visual communication design theory course taught at the University of Newcastle, NSW.
Abstract: This study reports on a series of changes involving collaboration, visualisation and audience presentation which were incrementally added to a first year visual communication design theory course taught at the University of Newcastle, NSW. It will discuss novice, first year students' experience of collaborating with peers and also look at how visual media methods were used in the construction of a theoretical argument. It responds to previous observations that many of our students were not engaging with theory at a deep intrinsic level, writing essays that were motivated by the extrinsic demands of passing a course than actual fascination with the theoretical dimensions of design. In contrast, visual communication design students thrive in studio environments where collaboration and immersion in visual methods of working are the norm. We put forward here, the argued position that student learning of design theory can be enhanced through the incorporation of working methods commonly used in creative practice.

6 citations


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01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: Using Language部分的�’学模式既不落俗套,又能真正体现新课程标准所倡导的�'学理念,正是年努力探索的问题.
Abstract: 人教版高中英语新课程教材中,语言运用(Using Language)是每个单元必不可少的部分,提供了围绕单元中心话题的听、说、读、写的综合性练习,是单元中心话题的延续和升华.如何设计Using Language部分的教学,使自己的教学模式既不落俗套,又能真正体现新课程标准所倡导的教学理念,正是广大一线英语教师一直努力探索的问题.

2,071 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the role and ethics of planners acting as sources of misinformation are considered, and a practical and politically sensitive form of progressive planning practice is defined. But the authors do not discuss the role of planners in this process.
Abstract: Abstract Information is a source of power in the planning process. This article begins by assessing five perspectives of the planner's use of information: those of the technician, the incremental pragmatist, the liberal advocate, the structuralist, and the “progressive.” Then several types of misinformation (inevitable or unnecessary, ad hoc or systematic) are distinguished in a reformulation of bounded rationality in planning, and practical responses by planning staff are identified. The role and ethics of planners acting as sources of misinformation are considered. In practice planners work in the face of power manifest as the social and political (mis)-man-agement of citizens' knowledge, consent, trust, and attention. Seeking to enable planners to anticipate and counteract sources of misinformation threatening public serving, democratic planning processes, the article clarifies a practical and politically sensitive form of “progressive” planning practice.

1,961 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, the author offers a bland narrative of the experience of modern life, for example, on the supermarket: "The customer wanders round in silence, reads labels, weighs fruit and vegetables on a machine that gives the price along with the weight, then hands his credit card to a young woman as silent as himself, not very chatty, who runs each article past the sensor of a decoding machine before checking the validity of the customer's credit card" (pp.99-100).
Abstract: It is ‘the logic of these late-capitalist phenomena’ that Augé attempts to describe. So far, so good, but this is only from Non-places’ back-cover blurb. In fact the book is very disappointing: the author offers a bland narrative of the experience of modern life, for example, on the supermarket: ‘The customer wanders round in silence, reads labels, weighs fruit and vegetables on a machine that gives the price along with the weight, then hands his credit card to a young woman as silent as himself—anyway, not very chatty—who runs each article past the sensor of a decoding machine before checking the validity of the customer’s credit card’ (pp.99–100). He nostalgically contrasts this to some romantic idealization of the (French) past, and mixes it up with what can only be described as pretentious waffle. To be fair, some of the concepts introduced are interesting. Anthropological places are contrasted to spaces; places in turn are contrasted to nonplaces: ‘If a place can be defined as relational, historical and concerned with identity, then a space which cannot be defined as relational, or historical, or concerned with identity will be a nonplace’ (pp.77-78). Modernity is contrasted to supermodernity: it is supermodernity which creates non-places, ‘spaces which are not themselves anthropological places and which, unlike Baudelairean modernity, do not integrate the earlier places...’ (p.78). For example, ‘in the modernity of the Baudelairean landscape ... everything is combined’, the old and new are interwoven; on the other hand, supermodernity ‘makes the old (history) into a specific spectacle, as it does with all exoticism and all local particularity ... in the non-places of supermodernity, there is always a specific position ... for “curiosities” presented as such’ (p.110). It’s true that airports, supermarkets, new housing estates, suburbs and so on are alienating (non-)places—just listen to Strummer’s lyrics to ‘Lost in the Supermarket’ (The Clash, London Calling, 1979); it is also true that we are forced to spend more and more of our lives in such (non-)places. This is why this little book appeared promising. But the concepts Augé employs are hopelessly inadequate to explain the proliferation and character of these ‘late capitalist phenomena’. The definition, cited above, of place vis-à-vis non-place begs the questions: relational to whom?, concerned with whose history?; whose identity? Augé’s point is, of course, that everywhere 144 Capital & Class #60

422 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Sawyer as mentioned in this paper argues that innovation is a product of groups, and that the solitary genius is a myth, and argues that the risk of propagating the single genius concept (to the exclusion of other possibilities) is that organizations will fail to support "messy" teams.
Abstract: Group Genius: The Creative Power of Collaboration; Keith Sawyer; Basic Books, NY, 2007; 274 pp., $26.95. If you're involved in a business that depends on sustained innovation (and which doesn't?)-especially if you're a manager who can influence decisions and resources-then add this to your reading list. Keith Sawyer's writing is direct, clear, even friendly, and the text is unencumbered by ponderous footnotes and thick quotations. An associate professor of psychology at Washington University, St. Louis, Sawyer's personal hobbies of jazz and improv theater appear again and again to support his thesis that innovation is a product of groups, and that the solitary genius is a myth. But the scope of the book is more than that: it covers the important and current thinking about fostering innovation in the Internet-enabled age. By my own reading and experience in a research-driven Fortune 500 corporation, the innovation literature is converging on a number of "best practices." Sawyer captures them well, and with his well-chosen supporting anecdotes these are reason enough to read the book and get to work applying these lessons in your organization: * Poorly structured, lazy brainstorming is practiced so frequently and is so wasteful, we can't have enough books that reveal its flaws and how to improve upon it. Sawyer's treatment is excellent. * Sustained innovation depends on having many irons in the fire, with the corollary that failure will be frequent and must be supported. * Myths about lone geniuses need bursting. Even those who work alone stand on the shoulders of giants, and implementation always needs teamwork and has its own continuing need for creative problem solving. The risk of propagating the solitary genius concept (to the exclusion of other possibilities) is that organizations will fail to support "messy" teams. * Innovation happens at the "edge of chaos"; either too much or too little structure is destructive. * Clusters are important. It may seem risky to have many firms in one location competing for a common pool of talent, but history shows that a crossfertilizing, dynamic environment is more innovative and sustainable. * The Internet and related communications standards are flattening the world at an unprecedented pace; the Web empowers enormous networks of individual innovators. Standing still is not an option. Group Genius also benefits from: * Annotated Notes: Sawyer has made a wise choice to keep the prose simple and fast-moving, but as a result, major ideas sometimes jump off the page as bald assertions (for example, ". . . the most effective . . . groups are self-managing. . . . without being directed by a leader."). The annotated notes at the end of the book provide good counterweight and credibility to the breezy style. * Frequent Checklists: The book is sprinkled with bulleted lists of do's and don'ts, which stitch the storytelling narrative together into practical advice. …

418 citations