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Mark W. Chavalas

Bio: Mark W. Chavalas is an academic researcher from University of Wisconsin–La Crosse. The author has contributed to research in topics: Assyria & Mesopotamia. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 23 publications receiving 282 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI

76 citations

Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: The IVP Bible Background Commentary: Old Testament as mentioned in this paper provides historical, social and cultural background for each passage of the Old Testament from Genesis through Malachi, from which a glossary of historical terms, ancient peoples, texts and inscriptions, and expanded explanations of significant background issues can be found.
Abstract: Preaching's Preacher's Guide to the Best Bible Reference for 2014 (General Reference) How can we account for the "Book of the Law" suddenly being discovered during Josiah's renovation of the temple (2 Chron 34:14)? We know from Egypt and Mesopotamia that it was common to seal important documents--including theological documents--in the masonry or foundations of a palace or temple in order to inform a future king who might undertake restoration of the building. What might the psalmist have had in mind when praising God for removing our transgressions "as far as the east is from the west" (Ps 103:12)? In an Egyptian hymn to Amun-Re, the deity is praised for his judgment of the guilty. As a result of the god's discernment the guilty are assigned to the east and the righteous to the west. What is meant by God "weighing the heart" (Prov 21:2)? In Egyptian religious tradition we find the notion of the dead being judged before the gods. As the soul is examined, the dead person's heart is weighed in a scale against a feather symbolizing Truth. If the answers are correct and the heart does not outweigh the feather, the soul may enter the realm of everlasting life. The narratives, genealogies, laws, poetry, proverbs and prophecies of the Old Testament are deeply rooted in history. Archaeologists, historians and social scientists have greatly advanced our knowledge of the ancient world of the Bible. When we illuminate the stories of Abraham or David, the imagery of the Psalms or Proverbs, or the prophecies of Isaiah or Jeremiah with this backlight of culture and history, these texts spring to new life. The unique commentary joinsThe IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament in providing historical, social and cultural background for each passage of the Old Testament. From Genesis through Malachi, this single volume gathers and condenses an abundance of specialized knowledge--making it available and accessible to ordinary readers of the Old Testament. Expert scholars John Walton, Victor Matthews and Mark Chavalas have included along with the fruits of their research and collaboration a glossary of historical terms, ancient peoples, texts and inscriptionsmaps and charts of important historical resourcesexpanded explanations of significant background issuesintroductory essays on each book of the Old TestamentThe IVP Bible Background Commentary: Old Testament will enrich your experience of the Old Testament--and your teaching and preaching from Scripture--in a way that no other commentary can do.

45 citations

Book
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this paper, Chavalas et al. present a collection of Neo-Babylonian Period Texts from Babylonia and Syro-Palestine (Brent A. Strawn, Jeff Cooley, Bill T. Arnold, Eva von Dassow, and Yoram Cohen).
Abstract: Acknowledgments. Abbreviations. Notes on Contributors. Illustrations. Introduction (Mark W. Chavalas). 1. Sumerian Early Dynastic Royal Inscriptions (Glenn Magid). 2. Old Akkadian Period Texts (Benjamin Studevent-Hickman and Christopher Morgan). 3. Late Third Millennium BCE Sumerian Texts (Richard Averbeck, Benjamin Studevent-Hickman, and Piotr Michalowski). 4. Old Babylonian Period Inscriptions (Frans van Koppen). 5. Miscellaneous Old Babylonian Period Documents (Frans van Koppen). 6. Late Bronze Age Inscriptions from Babylon, Assyria, and Syro-Palestine (Frans von Koppen, Kyle Greenwood, Christopher Morgan, Brent A. Strawn, Jeff Cooley, Bill T. Arnold, Eva von Dassow, and Yoram Cohen). 7. Correspondence from El-Amarna in Egypt (Eva von Dassow and Kyle Greenwood). 8. Hittite Historical Texts I (Gary Beckman, Petra Goedegebuure, Joost Hazenbos, and Yoram Cohen). 9. Hittite Historical Texts II (Kathleen R. Mineck, Theo van den Hout, and Harry A. Hoffner, Jr.). 10. Neo-Assyrian and Syro-Palestinian Texts I (Sarah C. Melville, Brent A. Strawn, Brian B. Schmidt, and Scott Noegel). 11. Neo-Assyrian and Syro-Palestinian Texts II (Brent A. Strawn, Sarah C. Melville, Kyle Greenwood, and Scott Noegel). 12. Neo-Babylonian Period Texts from Babylonia and Syro-Palestine (Benjamin Studevent-Hickman, Sarah C. Melville, and Scott Noegel). 13. Achaemenid Period Historical Texts Concerning Mesopotamia (Bill T. Arnold and Piotr Michalowski). Indexes.

31 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a review of new books about religion in ancient Mesopotamia, focusing on three types of religion: Islam, Christianity, and Islam. But they do not discuss the relationship between them.
Abstract: (2001). Religion in Ancient Mesopotamia. History: Reviews of New Books: Vol. 29, No. 4, pp. 182-182.

19 citations

Book
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: The quest for Sargon, Pul, and Tiglath-Pileser in the 19th century as mentioned in this paper was a Century of Tension in Assyriology and Biblical Studies.
Abstract: 1. Assyriology and Biblical Studies: A Century of Tension 2. The Quest for Sargon, Pul, and Tiglath-Pileser in the 19th Century 3. Sumer, the Bible, and Comparative Method: Historiography and Temple Building 4. Syria and Northern Mesopotamia to the End of the Third Millennium BCE 5. Syro-Mesopotamia: the Old Babylonian Period 6. Syria to the Early Second Millennium 7. Apprehending Kidnapers by Correspondence at Provincial Arrapha 8. The Bible and Alalakh 9. Emar: On the Road from Harran to Hebron 10. Voices from the Dust: The Tablets from Ugarit and the Bible 11. The Rise of the Aramean States 12. Recent Study on Sargon II, King of Assyria: Implications for Biblical Studies 13. What has Nebuchadnezzar to do with David? On the Neo-Babylonian Period and Early Israel 14. The Eastern Jewish Diaspora under the Babylonians.

16 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
31 Jul 2017

181 citations

Book
16 Dec 2009
TL;DR: In Water, esteemed journalist Steven Solomon describes a terrifying and all too real-world in which access to fresh water has replaced oil as the primary cause of global conflicts that increasingly emanate from drought-ridden, overpopulated areas of the world as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: "I read this wide-ranging and thoughtful book while sitting on the banks of the Ganges near Varanasi-it's a river already badly polluted, and now threatened by the melting of the loss of the glaciers at its source to global warming. Four hundred million people depend on it, and there's no backup plan. As Steven Solomon makes clear, the same is true the world over; this volume will give you the background to understand the forces that will drive much of 21st century history." -Bill McKibben In Water, esteemed journalist Steven Solomon describes a terrifying-and all too real-world in which access to fresh water has replaced oil as the primary cause of global conflicts that increasingly emanate from drought-ridden, overpopulated areas of the world. Meticulously researched and undeniably prescient, Water is a stunningly clear-eyed action statement on what Robert F Kennedy, Jr. calls "the biggest environmental and political challenge of our time."

150 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss several universal features of fortifications and distinguish those features that are unequivocally military in function, including V-sectioned ditches, "defended" (especially baffled) gates, and bastions.
Abstract: This article discusses several universal features of fortifications and distinguishes those features that are unequivocally military in function. The evidence adduced includes the features of known historic fortifications, relevant prescriptions by ancient military authors, and geometry. The archaeologically visible features that are universally used in military defenses are V-sectioned ditches, “defended” (especially baffled) gates, and bastions. It is also noted that ritual, ceremonial, or any other peaceful activities conducted within an enclosure having these architectural features does not preclude its obvious military function.

134 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The balance of power is one of the most influential theoretical ideas in international relations, but it has not yet been tested systematically in international systems other than modern Europe and its global successor as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The balance of power is one of the most influential theoretical ideas in international relations, but it has not yet been tested systematically in international systems other than modern Europe and its global successor. This article is the product of a collective and multidisciplinary research effort to redress this deficiency. We report findings from eight new case studies on balancing and balancing failure in different international systems that comprise over 2000 years of international politics. Our findings are inconsistent with any theory that predicts a tendency of international systems toward balance. The factors that best account for variation between balance and hegemony within and across international systems lie outside all recent renditions of balance-of-power theory and indeed, international relations scholarship more generally. Our findings suggest a potentially productive way to reframe research on both the European and contemporary international systems.

123 citations

Book
10 Mar 2016
TL;DR: Bachvarova as mentioned in this paper argues that in the Early Iron Age bilingual poets transmitted to the Greeks a set of narrative traditions closely related to the one found at Bronze-Age Hattusa, the Hittite capital.
Abstract: This book provides a groundbreaking reassessment of the prehistory of Homeric epic. It argues that in the Early Iron Age bilingual poets transmitted to the Greeks a set of narrative traditions closely related to the one found at Bronze-Age Hattusa, the Hittite capital. Key drivers for Near Eastern influence on the developing Homeric tradition were the shared practices of supralocal festivals and venerating divinized ancestors, and a shared interest in creating narratives about a legendary past using a few specific storylines: theogonies, genealogies connecting local polities, long-distance travel, destruction of a famous city because it refuses to release captives, and trying to overcome death when confronted with the loss of a dear companion. Professor Bachvarova concludes by providing a fresh explanation of the origins and significance of the Greco-Anatolian legend of Troy, thereby offering a new solution to the long-debated question of the historicity of the Trojan War.

103 citations