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Martha Sif Karrebæk

Bio: Martha Sif Karrebæk is an academic researcher from University of Copenhagen. The author has contributed to research in topics: Socialization & Sociolinguistics. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 35 publications receiving 385 citations.

Papers
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TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine lunchtime interactions between minority students and majority teachers in a Danish classroom and show that certain traditional food items (rye bread) are treated as superior to certain others that minority children regularly bring.
Abstract: Much socialization of children into healthy food practices takes place in the educational system. However, teachers' understandings of healthy food may differ from those of students and parents. Furthermore, health is connected to respectability. Thus, food socialization concerns more than nutritional values. This study examines lunchtime interactions between minority students and majority teachers in a Danish classroom. I show that certain traditional food items (rye bread) are treated as superior to certain others that minority children regularly bring. Children are accountable for lunch boxes, and cultural and personal preferences are disregarded if at odds with dominant understandings of healthy food. [language socialization, classroom interaction, respectability, multicultural classroom, interaction analyses]

85 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, the authors demonstrate how primary school children use food to organize social space, how they do it linguistically, and how they draw on different cultural and social models when doing it.

48 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors studied how school-authorities, parents and children co-create Danish dominance and a linguistic ideology of monolingualism during the first school year, and the primary focus was on two school-beginners with minority language background in a linguistically diverse classroom.
Abstract: It is of general interest to the study of language in society how ideologies motivating linguistic hegemony get formulated in the context of increasing diversity. This includes if and how linguistic diversity surfaces under conditions that are clearly disfavouring it, and why or why not it happens. Also, we need to know how ideologies of language surface at the micro-level, and how they are continuously passed on, shared, negotiated or contested. These are central issues in this study of socialization into a condition and an ideology of linguistic hegemony in Copenhagen, Denmark. It is illustrated how school-authorities, parents and children co-create Danish dominance and a linguistic ideology of monolingualism during the first school year. The primary focus is on two school-beginners with minority language background in a linguistically diverse classroom, and the linguistic registers of particular interest are Danish, the majority language, and Turkish, an immigrant language. The article builds on field-notes, ethnographic interviews, video- and audio-recordings. Linguistic Ethnography and Language Socialization constitute the methodological frameworks, and Silverstein’s ‘total linguistic fact’ forms an analytic principle. Europa karakteriseres af stigende befolkningsmaessig diversitet. Ikke mindst skolerne er dog stadig domineret af ideologier, der motiverer etsproget sproglig hegemoni. Det er af stor betydning for studiet af sprog i samfundet, hvordan sproglig mangfoldighed kommer til udtryk under betingelser, der defavoriserer den, samt hvorfor eller hvorfor ikke det sker.

44 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated mother tongue instruction (MTI) in Sweden and Denmark in a historical, comparative perspective, with a view to accounting for key differences in language policy enacted in educational fields.
Abstract: This article investigates mother tongue instruction (MTI) in Sweden and Denmark in a historical, comparative perspective, with a view to accounting for key differences in language policy enacted in educational fields. Whereas in Sweden, MTI is offered to linguistic minority children irrespective of their linguistic and ethnic backgrounds, in Denmark the right to state-sponsored MTI has been abolished for children of non-European descent. Moreover, while the policies of both states devalue skills in mother tongues other than the legitimate language of each society, this position is more pronounced in the Danish context. The article explores the two state’s position on MTI, as expressed in policy as well as in discourse produced in the political and academic field of each state. It subscribes to Pierre Bourdieu’s framework, within which state policy is conceived as the product of historical struggle and cross-field effects. The analysis shows that the national differences in MTI exist because of the differing ways in which agents from the academic vis-a-vis the political field have succeeded in imposing their visions in the bureaucratic field from which policies are produced. Ultimately, this circumstance explains why the Swedish discussion on MTI may be characterized as having been academically founded, while the Danish discussion has remained a matter of political consideration. In the latter case, we argue, it is particularly tangible that MTI is a politicized object of struggle, where agents seek to control the exchange rate of linguistic resources and, in effect, the social worth of different speakers.

30 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors offer an introduction to the methods being developed by scholars interested in studying food and language as interrelated phenomena and expand upon the specific methods they have developed for studying how foodways and language use are intertwined.
Abstract: This article offers an introduction to the methods being developed by scholars interested in studying food and language as interrelated phenomena. First, we explore a few of the intriguing parallels that have inspired a number of researchers to study food and language simultaneously. Then, we look at how the study of language led each of us to the study of food and consider if and how the methods we have used for this new enterprise differ from linguistic anthropological methods used to study other cultural material. Finally, we expand upon the specific methods we have developed for studying how foodways and language use are intertwined. In passing, we note some of the new research terrains and theoretical questions that may be explored by interweaving food-and-language methodologies in these ways. This multiauthored article, which emerged from a roundtable at the 2013 American Anthropological Association Annual meeting on the same topic, has a dialogic structure that reflects the ongoing conversation in which we are engaged while also manifesting the unfinished nature of the project.

26 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
28 Feb 2018
TL;DR: The following bibliography is conceived as a selection of international literature on food as heritage and as a marker of identity within the huge amount of works recently produced on the topic of food as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The following bibliography is conceived as a selection of international literature on food as heritage and as a marker of identity within the huge amount of works recently produced on the topic of food. The bibliography has been produced within the “Food as heritage” project, performed at University of Bologna and coordinated by Ilaria Porciani, with a team composed by Massimo Montanari, Paolo Capuzzo, Raffaele Laudani and Marica Tolomelli. “Food as heritage” is part of a wider projec...

472 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose the notion of chronotopes as invokable chunks of history that organize the indexical order of discourse, and scale as the scope of communicability of such invocations.
Abstract: Recent developments in the study of language in society have moved the field increasingly away from linear models toward complex models. The complexity of timespace as an aspect of what is called context is of key importance in this development, and this article engages with two possibly useful concepts in view of this: chronotope and scale. Chronotope can be seen as invokable chunks of history that organize the indexical order of discourse; scale, in turn, can be seen as the scope of communicability of such invocations. Thus, whenever we see chronotopes, we see them mediated by scales. The cultural stuff of chronotopes is conditioned by the sociolinguistic conditions of scale. This nuanced approach to timescale contextualization offers new directions for complexity-oriented research in our fields.

339 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

271 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 2004

261 citations