scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Martin Gill

Bio: Martin Gill is an academic researcher from Cardiff University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Criminal justice & Safeguarding. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 49 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors assesses the effectiveness of rights provided for suspects in police custody which were intended to counterbalance increased police powers and conclude that these safeguards have had a significant, although variable, impact.
Abstract: Reporting findings from research on the impact of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE), this paper assesses the effectiveness of rights provided for suspects in police custody which were intended to counterbalance increased police powers. It discusses (1) the involvement in the detention and questioning process of parents, social workers, and legal advisers; (2) the procedures which regulate the detention and questioning of suspects before charge; and (3) the effectiveness of sanctions and supervision. It concludes that these safeguards have had a significant, although variable, impact. Factors that have limited this impact are assessed. Claims that suspects’ rights are excessively hampering the detection of crime are criticized.

39 citations


Cited by
More filters
Book
06 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, the identification and measurement of 'oppressive' police interviewing tactics in Britain is discussed. But the authors focus on the psychological aspects of false confessions and the psychology of false belief leading to a false confession.
Abstract: About the Author.Series Preface.Preface.Acknowledgments.Introduction. PART I: INTERROGATIONS AND CONFESSIONS. Interrogation Tactics and Techniques. Interrogation in Britain. Persons at Risk During Interviews in Police Custody: the Royal Commission Studies. The Identification and Measurement of 'Oppressive' Police Interviewing Tactics in Britain. Why do Suspects Confess? Theories. Why do Suspects Confess? Empirical Findings. Miscarriages of Justice and False Confessions. The Psychology of False Confession: Research and Theoretical Issues. The Psychology of False Confession: Case Examples. PART II: LEGAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS. The English Law on Confessions. The American Law on Confessions. The Psychological Assessment. Suggestibility: Historical and Theoretical Aspects. Interrogative Suggestibility: Empirical Findings. PART III: BRITISH COURT OF APPEAL CASES. The Effects of Drugs and Alcohol Upon the Reliability of Testimony. The Court of Appeal. The 'Guildford Four' and the 'Birmingham Six'. Psychological Vulnerability. Police Impropriety. Misleading Special Knowledge. PART IV: FOREIGN CASES OF DISPUTED CONFESSIONS. Four High Profile American Cases. Canadian and Israeli Cases. Murder in Norway: a False Belief Leading to a False Confession. References. Appendix. Index.

635 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors use the term "interrogation" to refer to the questioning of criminal suspects, typically involving a confrontation, whereas the term 'interviewing' is more commonly used in cases of witnesses and victims.
Abstract: The term ‘interrogation’ is principally used in the literature and in police practice to refer to the questioning of criminal suspects, typically involving a confrontation, whereas the term ‘interviewing’ is more commonly used in cases of witnesses and victims. The term‘investigative interviewing’ has been proposed to cover both the interviewing of witnesses and suspects (Williamson 1993). However, for the purpose of this chapter we shall use the term ‘interrogation’ as we are specifically discussing the questioning of suspects.

175 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review and assessment of research on the British police demonstrates that much current work is limited in scope to immediate managerial concerns as discussed by the authors, and there is a need for a revival of the broader theoretical conceptions that have been displaced in recent years.
Abstract: The British police occupy a unique position as the first to be created under representative government, and one which for a long period was regarded as an exemplar of civility. In recent years, however, this image has been undermined by a number of scandals and controversies. The crisis in confidence in British policing has facilitated a huge explosion of police research in the last decade. Whereas earlier policing research had been primarily concerned with issues derived from a variety of social theories, current work is mainly policy oriented and evaluative. A review and assessment of research on the British police demonstrates that much current work is limited in scope to immediate managerial concerns. There is a need for a revival of the broader theoretical conceptions that have been displaced in recent years.

76 citations