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Mary Ann Harlan

Bio: Mary Ann Harlan is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Information literacy & Grounded theory. The author has an hindex of 6, co-authored 8 publications receiving 131 citations.

Papers
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Journal Article
TL;DR: This paper explored the research literature relevant to the increasingly popular field of Inquiry Based Learning (IBL) practices in K-12 academic environments and highlighted the need for qualitative work focused on the efficacy of a growing student-centered learning models.
Abstract: This paper explores the research literature relevant to the increasingly popular field of Inquiry Based Learning (IBL) practices in K-12 academic environments. IBL is constructivist and student-centered (Barron & Darling-Hammond, 2008; Condliffe, Visher, Bangser, Drohojowska & Saco 2016; Duffy & Raymer, 2010; Kuhlthau, Maniotes, & Caspari, 2015), leveraging student motivation and engagement through its grounding in authentic, relevant study (Deci & Ryan, 2016; SaundersStewart, Gyles, Shore & Bracewell, 2015). Recent research shows positive academic and achievement gains for students engaged in IBL work and the practice is growing. Some educators are experimenting with variations of increasingly student-driven models that privilege student choice and autonomy, such as 20% time or genius hour (Krebs & Zvi, 2015), passion-based learning (Maiers & Sandvold, 2010), and personalized learning (Bray & McClaskey, 2016). We name these more student-autonomous frameworks Student Driven Inquiry (SDI) models. The argument here is for qualitative research on the learner experience of these more recent SDI models in order to glean a more holistic understanding of the outcomes beyond grades and test scores. An examination of the recent literature on inquiry based learning, information literacy and student motivation demonstrates the need for qualitative work focused on the efficacy of a growing highly student-centered learning models.

46 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: This article explored the research literature relevant to the increasingly popular field of Inquiry Based Learning (IBL) practices in K-12 academic environments and highlighted the need for qualitative work focused on the efficacy of a growing student-centered learning models.
Abstract: This paper explores the research literature relevant to the increasingly popular field of Inquiry Based Learning (IBL) practices in K-12 academic environments. IBL is constructivist and student-centered (Barron & Darling-Hammond, 2008; Condliffe, Visher, Bangser, Drohojowska & Saco 2016; Duffy & Raymer, 2010; Kuhlthau, Maniotes, & Caspari, 2015), leveraging student motivation and engagement through its grounding in authentic, relevant study (Deci & Ryan, 2016; SaundersStewart, Gyles, Shore & Bracewell, 2015). Recent research shows positive academic and achievement gains for students engaged in IBL work and the practice is growing. Some educators are experimenting with variations of increasingly student-driven models that privilege student choice and autonomy, such as 20% time or genius hour (Krebs & Zvi, 2015), passion-based learning (Maiers & Sandvold, 2010), and personalized learning (Bray & McClaskey, 2016). We name these more student-autonomous frameworks Student Driven Inquiry (SDI) models. The argument here is for qualitative research on the learner experience of these more recent SDI models in order to glean a more holistic understanding of the outcomes beyond grades and test scores. An examination of the recent literature on inquiry based learning, information literacy and student motivation demonstrates the need for qualitative work focused on the efficacy of a growing highly student-centered learning models.

38 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An investigation into teens’ experiences in the United States, as they use information to learn how to create content and participate within the context of social media is reported on.
Abstract: As access to networked digital communities increases, a growing number of teens participate in digital communities by creating and sharing a variety of content. The affordances of social media - ease of use, ubiquitous access, and communal nature - have made creating and sharing content an appealing process for teens. Teens primarily learn the practices of encountering and using information through social interaction and participation within digital communities. This article adopts the position that information literacy is the experience of using information to learn. It reports on an investigation into teens experiences in the United States, as they use information to learn how to create content and participate within the context of social media. Teens that participate in sharing art on sites such as DeiviantArt, website creation, blogging, and/or posting edited videos via YouTube and Vimeo, were interviewed. The interviews explored teens' information experiences within particular social and digital contexts. Teens discussed the information they used, how information was gathered and accessed, and explored the process of using that information to participate in the communities.

29 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: From this investigation, a model of their information practices while creating and sharing content such as film-making, visual art work, story telling, music, programming, and web site design in digital participatory communities is emerged.
Abstract: What are the information practices of teen content creators? In the United States over two thirds of teens have participated in creating and sharing content in online communities that are developed for the purpose of allowing users to be producers of content. This study investigates how teens participating in digital participatory communities find and use information as well as how they experience the information. From this investigation emerged a model of their information practices while creating and sharing content such as film-making, visual art work, story telling, music, programming, and web site design in digital participatory communities. The research uses grounded theory methodology in a social constructionist framework to investigate the research problem: what are the information practices of teen content creators? Data was gathered through semi-structured interviews and observation of teen’s digital communities. Analysis occurred concurrently with data collection, and the principle of constant comparison was applied in analysis. As findings were constructed from the data, additional data was collected until a substantive theory was constructed and no new information emerged from data collection. The theory that was constructed from the data describes five information practices of teen content creators. The five information practices are learning community, negotiating aesthetic, negotiating control, negotiating capacity, and representing knowledge. In describing the five information practices there are three necessary descriptive components, the community of practice, the experiences of information and the information actions. The experiences of information include information as participation, inspiration, collaboration, process, and artifact. Information actions include activities that occur in the categories of gathering, thinking and creating. The experiences of information and information actions intersect in the information practices, which are situated within the specific community of practice, such as a digital participatory community. Finally, the information practices interact and build upon one another and this is represented in a graphic model and explanation.

12 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The authors explored the issues that impact research involving youth participants by making use of my research experience with youth information practices and trans disciplinary arguments regarding how we construct youth as a category, how memory impacts both our definition of youth and our research design, and how power structures can influence data collection and analysis.
Abstract: Introduction \ chool libraries serve both the youth - the students who attend the school, and adults - the teachers who work there. Research on issues that impact school libraries therefore can focus on a variety of contexts, including the school librarian, the teachers, the resources, and the students. This paper addresses specifically issues regarding research that focuses on youth, and at its core is a reflection on whether we are doing research "on" youth, or rather "with" youth, and why this distinction matters. I explore the issues that impact research involving youth participants by making use of my research experience with youth information practices and trans disciplinary arguments regarding how we construct youth as a category, how memory impacts both our definition of youth and our research design, and how power structures can influence data collection and analysis.LIS as a Transdisciplinary FieldOne of the strengths of library and information science (LIS) would seem to be the inherently transdisciplinary nature of information studies and of the avenues of inquiry that lend themselves to this particular field. Lankes (2011) maintains that the mission of librarians is to facilitate knowledge creation within their communities and that this mission is interdisciplinary. In the process of facilitating this knowledge, LIS naturally draws on the knowledge and language of other disciplines. On the other hand, this lack of a clear scope for the discipline can problematize the theory, methodology, and impact of LIS research. Thus, Bernier (2013) contends that LIS has "borrowed and applied variously and uncritically" (p. xiii) from other disciplines, in particular in regard to how we construct youth. He urges a more critical approach to how we engage with these disciplines. The celebration of and suspicion regarding the transdisciplinary nature of LIS are not entirely opposed positions, but rather build upon one another. Positioning LIS as a transdisciplinary field makes it incumbent upon those who work in it to understand knowledge from other fields in order to critically apply it to their own work. Awareness of issues and debates in outside fields can contribute to one's own research through a consideration of unfamiliar theories, perspectives, and findings. It is, however, necessary to consider carefully how the discourses of other disciplines are understood and applied.This paper explores how theories, methodologies, and research in critical youth studies, feminist studies, and library and information science impacted how I approached my dissertation, and how my understanding of these disciplines impacts my research agenda as I look to future research projects. I suggest that a critical examination of how LIS researchers develop their understanding of youth can have a positive impact on data collection and analysis. Since youth are a marginalized population in research, researchers have a responsibility to them, a responsibility to work, as alluded to above, "with" rather "on" youth. Consideration of this distinction will help to open up space for further discussion within LIS, specifically regarding school library research, about how the concerns of critical youth studies with youth agency may impact our own work.Defining YouthYouth adopt many different identities: daughter-son, sibling, child, teen, peer, friend, student, and so on. Each of these identities has impacts on how we construct our understanding of participants in research on youth. For school librarians and school library researchers, the familiar youth-as- student identity needs to be unpacked in order to examine the assumptions therein.Defining Youth and Life StagesFor those working in schools, and specifically researching school libraries, definitions of such concepts as youth, adolescence, and childhood appear on the surface to be uncomplicated. Thus we often group young people according to grade level or age. …

11 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Rewired: Understanding the iGeneration and the Way They Learn as discussed by the authors is a good introduction to recent research on the use of technology by young people, and the pedagogical potential of utilizing the rapid and unique changes in behaviour of this demographic.
Abstract: Larry D. Rosen argues for the need to more fully embrace technology and to incorporate digital media when educating young technologically advanced student cohorts. Rewired: Understanding the iGeneration and the Way They Learn is a good introduction to recent research on the use of technology by young people, and the pedagogical potential of utilising the rapid and unique changes in behaviour of this demographic. However, the book lacks consideration of the ethics of such a pedagogical approach in terms of the implications for students' health, labour and other environmental factors. View PDF for the full review

106 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

80 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigate how students learn to use information and subject content simultaneously in an informed learning lesson and find that some students understood the lesson to be about researching and writing an academic paper and others understood it as focusing on understanding both subject content and information use simultaneously.

39 citations