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MaryAnne M. Gobble

Bio: MaryAnne M. Gobble is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Column (database) & Innovation management. The author has an hindex of 13, co-authored 44 publications receiving 612 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Big Data: The Next Big Thing in Innovation Research-Technology Management: Vol 56, No 1, pp 64-67, 2013, Big Data is the next big thing in innovation research-technology management.
Abstract: (2013) Big Data: The Next Big Thing in Innovation Research-Technology Management: Vol 56, No 1, pp 64-67

197 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In a series of discussions aimed at defining the vocabulary of innovation management as discussed by the authors, the authors take on the profession's terms of art, exploring their origins and mappings to art.
Abstract: This column is the latest in a series of discussions aimed at defining the vocabulary of innovation management. The object is to take on the profession’s terms of art, exploring their origins and m...

116 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this column, I talked about the differences between digitalization and digitization, which is the conversion of atoms to bits—replacing paper with electronic files, pictures, and so on.
Abstract: In my last column, I talked about the differences between digitalization and digitization In short, digitization is the conversion of atoms to bits—replacing paper with electronic files, pictures

79 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The use of the concept of ecosystems has become the next big business buzzword as mentioned in this paper, and it has been used extensively in the last decade to describe the business environment and innovation.
Abstract: As Victor Hwang noted in an April 2014 article for Forbes , the term ecosystem has become "the next big business buzzword." Hwang's Google Ngrams demonstrate a dramatic increase in the use of the word in phrases like "business ecosystem" and "innovation ecosystem" in the last 10 years. Increasingly, authors, bloggers, and commentators use the term in place of such one-time favorites as network and cluster . The ecosystem- whether it's a business ecosystem, an innovation ecosystem, or a startup ecosystem-shows every sign of becoming the next business fad.Except, Hwang suggests, perhaps this is more than a fad. Perhaps it reflects a fundamental change in the way we think about business in general and innovation specifically. Although some writers use the term interchangeably with other words, ecosystem carries a very different set of connotations and implications than network or cluster . Networks and clusters are constructed; communications run along definable lines and it's mostly clear how activity in one part of the system will affect conditions elsewhere. They may be com plicated- consisting of many different parts and relationships-but they are not especially complex. An ecosystem, in contrast, is a complex, dynamic, emergent system that constantly adapts, sometimes in unexpected ways. As blogger Alastair Brett described it in a March 2014 blog post, ecosystems are "nonlinear complex adaptive systems where the same inputs don't always produce the same outputs, where the behavior of a system is not the sum of its individual parts, where there are disruptions and emergence, and where effects occur in far-from-equilibrium states."Perhaps one reflection of the organic, adaptive nature of the ecosystem is the lack of a single clear definition for "innovation ecosystem." The idea of an ecosystem is, of course, borrowed from biology where, as Deborah Jackson described it in a paper for the National Science Foundation, it refers to "a complex set of relationships among the living resources, habitats, and residents of an area, whose functional goal is to maintain an equilibrium sustaining state." A biological ecosystem is modeled by tracing the energy exchanges across the system, from plant to predator, to prey, and then back to the soil.The use of the ecosystem concept to describe the business environment originated with James Moore, who offered a definition of "business ecosystem" in his 1996 book The Death of Competition . In part, Moore describes a business ecosystem as "an economic community supported by a foundation of intera cting organizations and individuals-the organisms of the business world." In the business ecosystems, companies occupy niches, just as species do in a biological ecosystem, and the various members of the ecosystem co-evolve and tend to align themselves.A plethora of definitions has grown from the application of this basic concept to innovation. For Jackson, an innovation ecosystem is driven by economic dynamics rather than energy exchanges and is comprised of two separate, weakly coupled economies: the knowledge economy and the commercial economy. Erkko Autio and Llewellyn D. W. Thomas survey several definitions in their chapter in The Oxford Handbook of Innovation Management , each focusing on a slightly different set of characteristics and indicators, as do Susanne Durst and Petro Poutanen in their paper, "Success Factors of Innovation Ecosystems." Taken together, these surveys seem to converge to a particular set of elements that appear in most definitions of the concept: Innovation ecosystems are dynamic, purposive communities with complex, interlocking relationships built on collaboration, trust, and co-creation of value and specializing in exploitation of a shared set of complementary technologies or competencies. Strong innovation ecosystems, according to Autio and Thomas, are productive-they translate knowledge into increased value-and they are robust-resistant to disruption. …

71 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Migicovsky's Pebble smartwatch as mentioned in this paper is the most successful crowdfunding project in its three-year existence; the average project size is more in the range of $5,000 and the project had raised over $8.3 million from nearly 56,000 contributors.
Abstract: On April 11, 2012, Eric Migicovsky posted a Kickstarter project to fund production of his idea for a smartwatch--an app-supported "smartwatch" that connects to an iPhone or Android smartphone via Bluetooth to provide a range of useful functions, from messaging notifications and music control to distance and pace calculations for runners, swimmers, or bikers. He set his fundraising target at $100,000. A little more than 24 hours later, he had raised $1 million. As of May 3, the project had raised over $8.3 million from nearly 56,000 contributors. The Pebble smartwatch is by far Kickstarter's most successful project in its three-year existence; the average project size is more in the range of $5,000. Migicovsky went to Kickstarter after he failed to get venture capital support for his fledgling company, even with a working prototype, a solid business plan, and some sample apps. But, while backers who supported Migicovsky's project with pledges of $100 to $10,000 will get a really cool watch, they won't get equity in his company. That sort of exchange is illegal under the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, which limits the number of investors a company may have before it must go public--and subject itself to the significant bureaucratic burdens and intensified scrutiny accorded to public companies. A Kickstarter pledge may be an expression of confidence or a preorder, but it cannot be an investment. So, Kickstarter projects don't have investors; they have "backers" who pledge small amounts in return for personal engagement with a project, and sometimes a token gift. (In Migicovsky's case, the Kickstarter project essentially worked as a preorder mechanism, allowing him to gauge his market as well as gather funding.) The Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (or JOBS Act) is designed to change that. Signed into law by President Obama on April 5, 2012, the JOBS Act loosens regulatory requirements for small businesses on a number of fronts. It reduces the level and complexity of required SEC filings for businesses below a set income threshold, raises the number of shares a company can issue before it must go public, and offers other regulatory rollbacks. Among them is a provision to legalize crowdfunding--the kind of thing Kickstarter has been facilitating for small projects--as a source of startup financing. Beginning in 2013, entrepreneurs will be able to solicit funding from small investors and offer equity in return. The term "crowdfunding" is fairly recent; Michael Sullivan coined it in 2006, and most people have only become familiar with it through the rise of Kickstarter, which was initially focused on creative projects--think indie films or albums. But as a practice, crowdfunding has a much longer history. The construction of the Statue of Liberty was financed in France by a combination of public fees and lottery sales, and the statue's pedestal was paid for by a campaign that solicited small donations from the American people. Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF--a campaign that asked children to collect spare change instead of candy on their Halloween rounds and send the cash to the United Nations Children's Fund--is a form of crowdfunding. But crowdfunding as a venture financing mechanism was made illegal as part of the raft of finance reforms made in the wake of the 1929 stock market crash. In addition to the limits on numbers of investors, current regulations forbid the solicitation of equity investments outside a circle of "accredited investors" and require extensive disclosures before such investments can be sought. The JOBS Act, originally a small part of Obama's jobs program, attracted bipartisan support by building on the one thing both parties can agree on: small businesses provide most of the new jobs in the U.S. economy, and start-ups are needed to catalyze long-term economic recovery. With conventional financing sources drying up, small businesses are desperate for new ways to get the funding they need. …

44 citations


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Posted Content
TL;DR: An interpretive framework is presented that analyzes the definitional perspectives and the applications of big data, and a general taxonomy is provided that helps broaden the understanding ofbig data and its role in capturing business value.
Abstract: Big data has the potential to revolutionize the art of management. Despite the high operational and strategic impacts, there is a paucity of empirical research to assess the business value of big data. Drawing on a systematic review and case study findings, this paper presents an interpretive framework that analyzes the definitional perspectives and the applications of big data. The paper also provides a general taxonomy that helps broaden the understanding of big data and its role in capturing business value. The synthesis of the diverse concepts within the literature on big data provides deeper insights into achieving value through big data strategy and implementation.

1,024 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an interpretive framework that analyzes the definitional perspectives and the applications of big data and provide a general taxonomy that helps broaden the understanding of Big Data and its role in capturing business value.

997 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results illuminate the significant moderating impact of analytics capability–business strategy alignment on the BDAC–FPER relationship and the value of the entanglement conceptualization of the higher-order BDAC model and its impact on FPER.

754 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An interpretive framework is presented that explores the definitional aspects, distinctive characteristics, types, business value and challenges of BDA in the e-commerce landscape and synthesizes diverse BDA concepts that provide deeper insights along the cross-cutting analytics applications in e- commerce.
Abstract: There has been an increasing emphasis on big data analytics (BDA) in e-commerce in recent years. However, it remains poorly-explored as a concept, which obstructs its theoretical and practical development. This position paper explores BDA in e-commerce by drawing on a systematic review of the literature. The paper presents an interpretive framework that explores the definitional aspects, distinctive characteristics, types, business value and challenges of BDA in the e-commerce landscape. The paper also triggers broader discussions regarding future research challenges and opportunities in theory and practice. Overall, the findings of the study synthesize diverse BDA concepts (e.g., definition of big data, types, nature, business value and relevant theories) that provide deeper insights along the cross-cutting analytics applications in e-commerce.

435 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The paper reviews the multi-faceted applications of BIM during the construction stage and highlights limits and requirements, paving the way to the concept of a Construction Digital Twin, described in terms of underpinning research themes, while elaborating on areas for future research.

401 citations