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Author

Masakazu Yamamoto

Bio: Masakazu Yamamoto is an academic researcher. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 3 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a fragment of a colorless facet-cut glass vessel was collected at the Kamigamo Shrine, located in Kyoto, which was the capital city of Japan from late 8th century AD through the mid-19th century.

7 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the performance assessment of four different portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (p-XRF) units and the reconciling of their output were conducted and the results showed the limitations in cross-referencing the data obtained from each unit and suggest procedures to overcome the issues.
Abstract: X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is a non-destructive technique employed for elemental analysis of a wide range of materials. Its advantages are especially valued in archaeometry, where portable instruments are available. Considering ancient glass, such instruments allow for the detection of some major, minor, and trace elements linked to the deliberate addition of specific components or to impurities in the raw materials of the glass batch. Besides some undoubted advantages, portable XRF (p-XRF) has some limitations that are addressed in this study. The performance assessment of four different p-XRF units and the reconciling of their output were conducted. The results show the limitations in cross-referencing the data obtained from each unit and suggest procedures to overcome the issues. The p-XRF units were tested on the set of Corning reference glasses and on a small set of archaeological glasses with known composition. The compatibility of the output was assessed using multivariate statistical tools. Such a workflow allows us to consider data from multiple sources in the same frame of reference.

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article applied three kinds of portable analytical instruments to a nondestructive, on-site analysis of Late Bronze Age (LBA) artifacts excavated from a royal tomb at Qatna, Syria.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The use of a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer revealed the provenance of a shard of a relief-cut glass bowl which was dedicated to ancient ritual on the sacred island of Okinoshima, Japan over a thousand years ago as discussed by the authors.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
10 Mar 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors presented quantites de vases en verre au decor elabore, datant de l'epoque sassanide, etaient supposes provenir du Gilan, une hypothese que semblaient confirmer de rares pieces trouvees dans des tombes du Dailaman (voir S. Fukai, Study of Iranian Art and Archaeology: Glass and Metalwork, Tokyo, 1968).
Abstract: Dans les annees 1960, des quantites de vases en verre au decor elabore, datant de l’epoque sassanide, etaient supposes provenir du Gilan, une hypothese que semblaient confirmer de rares pieces trouvees dans des tombes du Dailaman (voir S. Fukai, Study of Iranian Art and Archaeology: Glass and Metalwork, Tokyo, 1968) ou supposees provenir de cette region tres pillee. De la, cette region etait supposee etre le lieu de production de ces verreries, qui aurait fourni aussi la Mesopotamie. L’A. mon...

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Li et al. as mentioned in this paper used the M2 crown to investigate its surface inlays and overall shape, then conduct a comparative analysis of women's crown ornaments of the same type, providing a reference for study of the crown.
Abstract: Abstract A woman’s crown made of fine gilt bronze with refined glass inlay work was excavated from a Sui-Tang tomb called Kunlun M2 in Xi’an, Shaanxi Province, China. Very few female crowns and crown ornaments have been excavated in China thus far, and there has been a lack of systematic research into the technologies used to manufacture them. Importantly, this paper uses the M2 crown to investigate its surface inlays and overall shape, then conducts a comparative analysis of women's crown ornaments of the same type, providing a reference for study of the crown. Non-invasive and micro-destructive analysis including optical microscopy (OM), optical coherence tomography (OCT), micro X-ray fluorescence imagery (XRF), and Raman spectroscopy were applied. These identified the crown’s inlays as potash-lime glass, composed mainly of the raw materials: vein quartz or quartzite with potassium nitrate as flux. The inlays were sintered before embedding into gilt copper wire filigree. In comparison to the composition proportions in other ancient potash-lime glass, there is no specific percentage of the raw materials in Chinese potash-lime glass, where the ingredients were likely determined by the experience of the craftsman. Compared with existing research on other crowns and their inlays, this study speculates that the crown dates from the Sui dynasty (581–618) or early Tang dynasty (618–649), was made locally by Chinese craftsmen and belonged to the wife of a high official.

1 citations