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Masayuki Fujita

Bio: Masayuki Fujita is an academic researcher from Osaka University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Terahertz radiation & Photonic crystal. The author has an hindex of 32, co-authored 186 publications receiving 4870 citations. Previous affiliations of Masayuki Fujita include Kyoto University & Yokohama National University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe the recent experimental progress in the control of spontaneous emission by manipulating optical modes with photonic crystals, which can contribute to the evolution of a variety of applications, including illumination, display, optical communication, solar energy and even quantum information systems.
Abstract: We describe the recent experimental progress in the control of spontaneous emission by manipulating optical modes with photonic crystals. It has been clearly demonstrated that the spontaneous emission from light emitters embedded in photonic crystals can be suppressed by the so-called photonic bandgap, whereas the emission efficiency in the direction where optical modes exist can be enhanced. Also, when an artificial defect is introduced into the photonic crystal, a photonic nanocavity is produced that can interact with light emitters. Cavity quality factors, or Q factors, of up to 2 million have been realized while maintaining very small mode volumes, and both spontaneous-emission modification (the Purcell effect) and strong-coupling phenomena have been demonstrated. The use of photonic crystals and nanocavities to manipulate spontaneous emission will contribute to the evolution of a variety of applications, including illumination, display, optical communication, solar energy and even quantum-information systems.

936 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
27 May 2005-Science
TL;DR: This work demonstrates both the “inhibition” and “redistribution” of spontaneous light emission by using two-dimensional photonic crystals, in which the refractive index is changed two-dimensionally.
Abstract: Inhibiting spontaneous light emission and redistributing the energy into useful forms are desirable objectives for advances in various fields, including photonics, illuminations, displays, solar cells, and even quantum-information systems. We demonstrate both the "inhibition" and "redistribution" of spontaneous light emission by using two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals, in which the refractive index is changed two-dimensionally. The overall spontaneous emission rate is found to be reduced by a factor of 5 as a result of the 2D photonic bandgap effect. Simultaneously, the light energy is redistributed from the 2D plane to the direction normal to the photonic crystal.

485 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
17 Jun 2011-Science
TL;DR: Detailed geophysical measurements reveal features of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki megathrust earthquake and provide fundamental insights into the behavior of rare, very large earthquakes that may aid in preparation and early warning efforts for future tsunamis following subduction zone earthquakes.
Abstract: The moment magnitude (M(w)) = 9.0 2011 Tohoku-Oki mega-thrust earthquake occurred off the coast of northeastern Japan. Combining Global Positioning System (GPS) and acoustic data, we detected very large sea-floor movements associated with this event directly above the focal region. An area with more than 20 meters of horizontal displacement, that is, four times larger than those detected on land, stretches several tens of kilometers long along the trench; the largest amount reaches about 24 meters toward east-southeast just above the hypocenter. Furthermore, nearly 3 meters of vertical uplift occurred, contrary to observed terrestrial subsidence.

417 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors demonstrate robust terahertz topological valley transport through several sharp bends on the all-silicon chip and achieve real-time transmission of uncompressed 4K high-definition video.
Abstract: The realization of integrated, low-cost and efficient solutions for high-speed, on-chip communication requires terahertz-frequency waveguides and has great potential for information and communication technologies, including sixth-generation (6G) wireless communication, terahertz integrated circuits, and interconnects for intrachip and interchip communication. However, conventional approaches to terahertz waveguiding suffer from sensitivity to defects and sharp bends. Here, building on the topological phase of light, we experimentally demonstrate robust terahertz topological valley transport through several sharp bends on the all-silicon chip. The valley kink states are excellent information carriers owing to their robustness, single-mode propagation and linear dispersion. By leveraging such states, we demonstrate error-free communication through a highly twisted domain wall at an unprecedented data transfer rate (exceeding ten gigabits per second) that enables real-time transmission of uncompressed 4K high-definition video (that is, with a horizontal display resolution of approximately 4,000 pixels). Terahertz communication with topological devices opens a route towards terabit-per-second datalinks that could enable artificial intelligence and cloud-based technologies, including autonomous driving, healthcare, precision manufacturing and holographic communication. Robust terahertz wave transport is demonstrated on a silicon chip using the valley Hall topological phase. Error-free communication is achieved at a data rate of 11 Gbit s−1, enabling real-time transmission of uncompressed 4K high-definition video.

368 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a theoretical analysis on the light-extraction efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes was performed using finite-difference time-domain method and an analytic method such as the mode-expansion method.

187 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the electronic and optical properties and the recent progress in applications of 2D semiconductor transition metal dichalcogenides with emphasis on strong excitonic effects, and spin- and valley-dependent properties are reviewed.
Abstract: The electronic and optical properties and the recent progress in applications of 2D semiconductor transition metal dichalcogenides with emphasis on strong excitonic effects, and spin- and valley-dependent properties are reviewed. Recent advances in the development of atomically thin layers of van der Waals bonded solids have opened up new possibilities for the exploration of 2D physics as well as for materials for applications. Among them, semiconductor transition metal dichalcogenides, MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se), have bandgaps in the near-infrared to the visible region, in contrast to the zero bandgap of graphene. In the monolayer limit, these materials have been shown to possess direct bandgaps, a property well suited for photonics and optoelectronics applications. Here, we review the electronic and optical properties and the recent progress in applications of 2D semiconductor transition metal dichalcogenides with emphasis on strong excitonic effects, and spin- and valley-dependent properties.

2,612 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the time dependence of ρ11, ρ22 and ρ12 under steady-state conditions was analyzed under a light field interaction V = -μ12Ee iωt + c.c.
Abstract: (b) Write out the equations for the time dependence of ρ11, ρ22, ρ12 and ρ21 assuming that a light field interaction V = -μ12Ee iωt + c.c. couples only levels |1> and |2>, and that the excited levels exhibit spontaneous decay. (8 marks) (c) Under steady-state conditions, find the ratio of populations in states |2> and |3>. (3 marks) (d) Find the slowly varying amplitude ̃ ρ 12 of the polarization ρ12 = ̃ ρ 12e iωt . (6 marks) (e) In the limiting case that no decay is possible from intermediate level |3>, what is the ground state population ρ11(∞)? (2 marks) 2. (15 marks total) In a 2-level atom system subjected to a strong field, dressed states are created in the form |D1(n)> = sin θ |1,n> + cos θ |2,n-1> |D2(n)> = cos θ |1,n> sin θ |2,n-1>

1,872 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a number of consequences of relativistic-strength optical fields are surveyed, including wakefield generation, a relativistically version of optical rectification, in which longitudinal field effects could be as large as the transverse ones.
Abstract: The advent of ultraintense laser pulses generated by the technique of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) along with the development of high-fluence laser materials has opened up an entirely new field of optics. The electromagnetic field intensities produced by these techniques, in excess of ${10}^{18}\phantom{\rule{0.3em}{0ex}}\mathrm{W}∕{\mathrm{cm}}^{2}$, lead to relativistic electron motion in the laser field. The CPA method is reviewed and the future growth of laser technique is discussed, including the prospect of generating the ultimate power of a zettawatt. A number of consequences of relativistic-strength optical fields are surveyed. In contrast to the nonrelativistic regime, these laser fields are capable of moving matter more effectively, including motion in the direction of laser propagation. One of the consequences of this is wakefield generation, a relativistic version of optical rectification, in which longitudinal field effects could be as large as the transverse ones. In addition to this, other effects may occur, including relativistic focusing, relativistic transparency, nonlinear modulation and multiple harmonic generation, and strong coupling to matter and other fields (such as high-frequency radiation). A proper utilization of these phenomena and effects leads to the new technology of relativistic engineering, in which light-matter interactions in the relativistic regime drives the development of laser-driven accelerator science. A number of significant applications are reviewed, including the fast ignition of an inertially confined fusion target by short-pulsed laser energy and potential sources of energetic particles (electrons, protons, other ions, positrons, pions, etc.). The coupling of an intense laser field to matter also has implications for the study of the highest energies in astrophysics, such as ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, with energies in excess of ${10}^{20}\phantom{\rule{0.3em}{0ex}}\mathrm{eV}$. The laser fields can be so intense as to make the accelerating field large enough for general relativistic effects (via the equivalence principle) to be examined in the laboratory. It will also enable one to access the nonlinear regime of quantum electrodynamics, where the effects of radiative damping are no longer negligible. Furthermore, when the fields are close to the Schwinger value, the vacuum can behave like a nonlinear medium in much the same way as ordinary dielectric matter expanded to laser radiation in the early days of laser research.

1,459 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the state-of-the-art technologies on photonics-based terahertz communications are compared with competing technologies based on electronics and free-space optical communications.
Abstract: This Review covers the state-of-the-art technologies on photonics-based terahertz communications, which are compared with competing technologies based on electronics and free-space optical communications. Future prospects and challenges are also discussed. Almost 15 years have passed since the initial demonstrations of terahertz (THz) wireless communications were made using both pulsed and continuous waves. THz technologies are attracting great interest and are expected to meet the ever-increasing demand for high-capacity wireless communications. Here, we review the latest trends in THz communications research, focusing on how photonics technologies have played a key role in the development of first-age THz communication systems. We also provide a comparison with other competitive technologies, such as THz transceivers enabled by electronic devices as well as free-space lightwave communications.

1,238 citations