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Mathias Risse

Bio: Mathias Risse is an academic researcher from Harvard University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Human rights & Global justice. The author has an hindex of 24, co-authored 125 publications receiving 2058 citations. Previous affiliations of Mathias Risse include Princeton University & Yale University.


Papers
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Mathias Risse1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that much of what Thomas Pogge says about our duty toward developing countries is false and that the global order not only does not harm the poor but can plausibly be credited with the considerable improvements in human well-being that have been achieved over the last 200 years.
Abstract: A central theme throughout Thomas Pogge's pathbreaking World Poverty and Human Rights is that the global political and economic order harms people in developing countries, and that our duty toward the global poor is therefore not to assist them but to rectify injustice. But does the global order harm the poor? I argue elsewhere that there is a sense in which this is indeed so, at least if a certain empirical thesis is accepted. In this essay, however, I seek to show that the global order not only does not harm the poor but can plausibly be credited with the considerable improvements in human well-being that have been achieved over the last 200 years. Much of what Pogge says about our duties toward developing countries is therefore false.

223 citations

Book
16 Sep 2012
TL;DR: The Ground of Common Citizenship and Common Humanity as mentioned in this paper is a ground of common ownership of the Earth and common citizenship for all of us to be a part of our common humanity. But it is not a ground for common ownership for all humans.
Abstract: Preface ix Acknowledgments xiii Part 1: Shared Citizenship and Common Humanity * Chapter 1: The Grounds of Justice 1 * Chapter 2: "Un Pouvoir Ordinaire": Shared Membership in a State as a Ground of Justice 23 * Chapter 3: Internationalism versus Statism and Globalism: Contemporary Debates 41 * Chapter 4: What Follows from Our Common Humanity? The Institutional Stance, Human Rights, and Nonrelationism 63 Part 2: Common Ownership of the Earth * Chapter 5: Hugo Grotius Revisited: Collective Ownership of the Earth and Global Public Reason 89 * Chapter 6: "Our Sole Habitation": A Contemporary Approach to Collective Ownership of the Earth 108 * Chapter 7: Toward a Contingent Derivation of Human Rights 130 * Chapter 8: Proportionate Use: Immigration and Original Ownership of the Earth 152 * Chapter 9: "But the Earth Abideth For Ever": Obligations to Future Generations 167 * Chapter 10: Climate Change and Ownership of the Atmosphere 187 Part 3: International Political and Economic Structures * Chapter 11: Human Rights as Membership Rights in the Global Order 209 * Chapter 12: Arguing for Human Rights: Essential Pharmaceuticals 232 * Chapter 13: Arguing for Human Rights: Labor Rights as Human Rights 245 * Chapter 14: Justice and Trade 261 Part 4: Global Justice and Institutions * Chapter 15: The Way We Live Now 281 * Chapter 16: "Imagine There's No Countries": A Reply to John Lennon 304 * Chapter 17: Justice and Accountability: The State 325 * Chapter 18: Justice and Accountability: The World Trade Organization 346 Notes 361 Bibliography 415 Index 453

163 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The right to relocate: Disappearing Island Nations and Common Ownership of the Earth as mentioned in this paper is a common ownership of the earth approach for small island nations whose existence is threatened by global climate change.
Abstract: The Right to Relocation: Disappearing Island Nations and Common Ownership of the EarthMathias RisseIn recent work I have tried to revitalize the standpoint of humanity's commonly owning the earth. This standpoint has implications for a range of problems that have recently preoccupied us at the global level, including immigration, obligations to future generations, climate change, and human rights. In particular, this approach helps illuminate what moral claims to international aid small island nations whose existence is threatened by global climate change have. A recent proposal for relocating his people across different nations by President Tong of Kiribati is a case in point. My approach vindicates President Tong's proposal.

110 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: More than 20 percent of the world population lives in abject poverty, on less than $1 per day, and about 50 percent of them are illiterate, according to as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: More than 20 percent of the world population lives in abject poverty, on less than $1 per day, and about 50 percent on less than $2. Twenty-five percent is illiterate. The two-and-a-half billion people in low-income countries have an infant mortality rate of over one hundred for every thousand live births, compared to six in high-income countries. According to widely circulating statistics, the ratio between rich and poor has increased dramatically: in 1820, the ratio in average per capita incomes was three to one, in 1960 sixty to one, and in 1997 seventy-four to one. The contrast between lavishly rich North Americans whose urgent questions of the day are about where to go for dinner and when to meet one’s How Does the Global Order Harm the Poor? MATHIAS RISSE

110 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Mathias Risse1
TL;DR: In a postcard to Overbeck from January 4, 1888, Nietzsche makes some illuminating remarks with respect to the three treatises in his book On the Genealogy of Morality as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: On a postcard to Franz Overbeck from January 4, 1888, Nietzsche makes some illuminating remarks with respect to the three treatises in his book On the Genealogy of Morality.2 Nietzsche says that, ‘for the sake of clarity, it was necessary artificially to isolate the different roots of that complex structure that is called morality. Each of these three treatises expresses a single primum mobile; a fourth and fifth are missing, as is even the most essential (‘the herd instinct’) – for the time being, the latter had to be ignored, as too comprehensive, and the same holds for the ultimate summation of all those different elements and thus a final account of morality.’ Nietzsche also points out that each treatise makes a contribution to the genesis of Christianity and rejects an explanation of Christianity in terms of only one psychological category. The topics of the treatises are ‘good’ and ‘evil’ (first treatise), the ‘bad conscience’ (second), and the ‘ascetic ideal’ (third). The postcard suggests that Nietzsche discusses these topics separately because a joint treatment is too complicated, but that in reality, these ideas are inextricably intertwined, both with each other and with others that Nietzsche omits. Therefore, the three treatises should be regarded as parts of a unified theory and critique of morality. Nietzsche’s remarks on that postcard are important because in the Genealogy itself, he makes little effort to show the unity among the treatises. We shall return to this postcard repeatedly.3 The first treatise has attracted most scholarly attention, but much less work has been done on the second treatise, ‘ “Debts”, “Bad Conscience”, and Related Matters’. This is unfortunate, since it seems that, in Nietzsche’s own view, the central notion of the second treatise, namely, the bad conscience as a feeling of guilt, is a key element of Christian morality. Therefore, understanding Nietzsche’s treatment of this notion is essential to understanding his views on Christianity and the impact of the Christian heritage on non-religious moral philosophy. At the same time, however, the second treatise confronts the reader with considerable exegetical difficulties. In particular, Nietzsche’s remarks about the bad conscience itself make it hard to conceive of them as contributions to a coherent account of the same concept. Ridley’s 1998 study of the Genealogy finds no way of making sense of all of them and ends up classifying several remarks on the bad

67 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a document, redatto, voted and pubblicato by the Ipcc -Comitato intergovernativo sui cambiamenti climatici - illustra la sintesi delle ricerche svolte su questo tema rilevante.
Abstract: Cause, conseguenze e strategie di mitigazione Proponiamo il primo di una serie di articoli in cui affronteremo l’attuale problema dei mutamenti climatici. Presentiamo il documento redatto, votato e pubblicato dall’Ipcc - Comitato intergovernativo sui cambiamenti climatici - che illustra la sintesi delle ricerche svolte su questo tema rilevante.

4,187 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is impossible that the rulers now on earth should make any benefit, or derive any the least shadow of authority from that, which is held to be the fountain of all power, Adam's private dominion and paternal jurisdiction.
Abstract: All these premises having, as I think, been clearly made out, it is impossible that the rulers now on earth should make any benefit, or derive any the least shadow of authority from that, which is held to be the fountain of all power, Adam's private dominion and paternal jurisdiction; so that he that will not give just occasion to think that all government in the world is the product only of force and violence, and that men live together by no other rules but that of beasts, where the strongest carries it, and so lay a foundation for perpetual disorder and mischief, tumult, sedition and rebellion, (things that the followers of that hypothesis so loudly cry out against) must of necessity find out another rise of government, another original of political power, and another way of designing and knowing the persons that have it, than what Sir Robert Filmer hath taught us.

3,076 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In some religious traditions, the myth of the ‘Fall from the Garden of Eden’ symbolizes the loss of the primordial state through the veiling of higher consciousness.
Abstract: Human beings are described by many spiritual traditions as ‘blind’ or ‘asleep’ or ‘in a dream.’ These terms refers to the limited attenuated state of consciousness of most human beings caught up in patterns of conditioned thought, feeling and perception, which prevent the development of our latent, higher spiritual possibilities. In the words of Idries Shah: “Man, like a sleepwalker who suddenly ‘comes to’ on some lonely road has in general no correct idea as to his origins or his destiny.” In some religious traditions, such as Christianity and Islam, the myth of the ‘Fall from the Garden of Eden’ symbolizes the loss of the primordial state through the veiling of higher consciousness. Other traditions use similar metaphors to describe the spiritual condition of humanity:

2,223 citations