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Maureen Turim

Bio: Maureen Turim is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Installation art & Classical tradition. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 10 publications receiving 198 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Sep 1989

96 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2001-Screen

42 citations

Book
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: The work of Oshima Nagisa as discussed by the authors is an essential introduction to the work of a major postwar director of Japanese cinema and a theoretical exploration of strategies of filmic style, which Maureen Turim explores in relation to psychoanalytic and post-modern theory.
Abstract: This study of the films of Oshima Nagisa is both an essential introduction to the work of a major postwar director of Japanese cinema and a theoretical exploration of strategies of filmic style. For almost forty years, Oshima has produced provocative films that have received wide distribution and international acclaim. Formally innovative as well as socially daring, they provide a running commentary, direct and indirect, on the cultural and political tensions of postwar Japan. Best known today for his controversial films In the Realm of the Senses and The Empire of Passion, Oshima engages issues of sexuality and power, domination and identity, which Maureen Turim explores in relation to psychoanalytic and postmodern theory. The films' complex representation of women in Japanese society receives detailed and careful scrutiny, as does their political engagement with the Japanese student movement, postwar anti-American sentiments, and critiques of Stalinist tendencies of the Left. Turim also considers Oshima's surprising comedies, his experimentation with Brechtian and avant-garde theatricality as well as reflexive textuality, and his essayist documentaries in this look at an artist's gifted and vital attempt to put his will on film.

26 citations

Book ChapterDOI
26 Sep 2007

17 citations

Book
01 Feb 1985
TL;DR: Turim et al. as mentioned in this paper discuss the use of avant-garde approach in Avant-Garde Films by Maureen Cheryn Turim Assistant Professor Department of Cinema State University of New York at Binghamton.
Abstract: ion in Avant-Garde Films by Maureen Cheryn Turim Assistant Professor Department of Cinema State University of New York at Binghamton

9 citations


Cited by
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Book
28 Jan 2000
TL;DR: Genre and Hollywood as discussed by the authors provides a comprehensive introduction to the study of genre and its application in Hollywood's history and culture, and argues that genre remains an important and productive means of thinking about both New and old Hollywood, its history, its audiences and its films.
Abstract: Genre and Hollywood provides a comprehensive introduction to the study of genre. In this important new book, Steve Neale discusses all the major concepts, theories and accounts of Hollywood and genre, as well as the key genres which theorists have written about, from horror to the Western. He also puts forward new arguments about the importance of genre in understanding Hollywood cinema.Neale takes issue with much genre criticism and genre theory, which has provided only a partial and misleading account of Hollywood's output. He calls for broader and more flexible conceptions of genre and genres, for more attention to be paid to the discourses and practices of Hollywood itself, for the nature and range of Hollywood's films to be looked at in more detail, and for any assessment of the social and cultural significance of Hollywood's genres to take account of industrial factors.In detailed, revisionist accounts of two major genres - film noir and melodrama - Neale argues that genre remains an important and productive means of thinking about both New and old Hollywood, its history, its audiences and its films.

391 citations

Book
04 Dec 2015
TL;DR: The authors argue that climate change is a form of "slow violence" that humans are inflicting on the environment, and that such violence is accompanied by its own psychological condition, what its author terms "Pretraumatic Stress Disorder."
Abstract: Each month brings new scientific findings that demonstrate the ways in which human activities, from resource extraction to carbon emissions, are doing unprecedented,perhaps irreparable damage to our world. As we hear these climate change reports and their predictions for the future of Earth, many of us feel a sickening sense of deja vu, as though we have already seen the sad outcome to this story. Drawing from recent scholarship that analyzes climate change as a form of "slow violence" that humans are inflicting on the environment, Climate Trauma theorizes that such violence is accompanied by its own psychological condition, what its author terms "Pretraumatic Stress Disorder." Examining a variety of films that imagine a dystopian future, renowned media scholar E. Ann Kaplan considers how the increasing ubiquity of these works has exacerbated our sense of impending dread. But she also explores ways these films might help us productively engage with our anxieties, giving us a seemingly prophetic glimpse of the terrifying future selves we might still work to avoid becoming. Examining dystopian classics like Soylent Green alongside more recent examples like The Book of Eli, Climate Trauma also stretches the limits of the genre to include features such as Blindness, The Happening, Take Shelter, and a number of documentaries on climate change. These eclectic texts allow Kaplan to outline the typical blindspots of the genre, which rarely depicts climate catastrophe from the vantage point of women or minorities. Lucidly synthesizing cutting-edge research in media studies, psychoanalytic theory, and environmental science, Climate Trauma provides us with the tools we need to extract something useful from our nightmares of a catastrophic future.

66 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2018
Abstract: This thesis analyses documentary and fictional films in postdictatorship Chile that respond to, or invoke, the experience of haunting. The concept of haunting is often used to describe the legacies of violent conflict and state repression, however, in the Chilean context, it has rarely been submitted to critique or analysis. Drawing on the work of Avery Gordon (2008), Jacques Derrida (1994) and Berber Bevernage (2013), I read haunting as a “structure of feeling” (Williams 1977) that is both repressive and transformative. The films I analyse respond to and reckon with this structure of feeling, in the process creating new imaginaries of mourning, inheritance and justice. Haunting also serves as a theoretical lens through which to analyse the films that is distinct from the lenses of trauma, cultural memory and transitional justice. The concept of haunting makes a distinctive contribution to postdictatorship studies by illuminating the ways in which films depart from the dominant spatial and temporal imaginaries of the democratic transition, responding to the present past as a realm of enduring emancipatory possibility. While dominant formulations of transitional time are premised on overcoming the dark past, and ensuring that it does not return, the haunted temporalities of the films and theoretical texts I read problematise strict delineations between dictatorship and democracy and offer new ways of narrating the presence of the dead. I start by analysing representations of the Chilean presidential palace, an emblematic site at which narratives of past violence and Chilean exceptionalism intersect. Subsequently, I analyse films from the early transition (1990-2000) and the late transition (2000—), engaging with theories of empathic unsettlement (LaCapra 2001; Hite 2014) and the expanded field (Krauss 1979; Huyssen 2003; Andermann 2012a). I conclude in the Atacama Desert by reflecting on the representation of landscapes of haunting and disappearance in which traces from different histories of repression, resistance and social transformation are read alongside each other. These non-contemporaneous landscapes not only expose the long history of state repression in Chile, but point to truncated, unfinished and ongoing struggles around which emergent imaginaries of social transformation might be built.

60 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It appears that dissociative amnesia is not a natural neuropsychological phenomenon, but instead a culture-bound syndrome, dating from the nineteenth century.
Abstract: BackgroundNatural human psychological phenomena, such as depression, anxiety, delusions, hallucinations and dementia, are documented across the ages in both fictional and non-fictional works. We asked whether ‘dissociative amnesia’ was similarly documented throughout history.MethodWe adverti

58 citations

MonographDOI
31 Jan 2020
TL;DR: The first systematic appreciation of Ovid's extensive influence on, and affinity with, modern visual culture is presented in this article, where a wide range of ramifications that Ovidian archetypes, especially from the Metamorphoses, have provoked in a modern artistic medium was discussed.
Abstract: This book presents the first systematic appreciation of Ovid's extensive influence on, and affinity with, modern visual culture. Some topics are directly related to Ovid; others exhibit features, characters, or themes analogous to those in his works. The book demonstrates the wide-ranging ramifications that Ovidian archetypes, especially from the Metamorphoses, have provoked in a modern artistic medium that did not exist in Ovid's time. It ranges from the earliest days of film history (Georges Melies's discovery of screen metamorphosis) and theory (Gabriele D'Annunzio's fascination with the metamorphosis of Daphne; Sergei Eisenstein's concept of film sense) through silent films, classic sound films, commercial cinema, art-house and independent films to modernism and the C.G.I. era. Films by well-known directors, including Ingmar Bergman, Walerian Borowczyk, Jean Cocteau, Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, Fritz Lang, Max Ophuls, Alain Resnais, and various others, are analyzed in detail.

54 citations