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Maurice Blanc

Bio: Maurice Blanc is an academic researcher from University of Strasbourg. The author has contributed to research in topics: Citizenship & Social integration. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 21 publications receiving 147 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors assess the discrepancies between the rhetorical level of policy aims and the pragmatic level of public policy outputs, raising methodological issues on the relevance of the communal scale for the measure of segregation and social mix.
Abstract: In France, a Housing Act, called Solidarite et Renouvellement Urbain (Solidarity and Urban Renewal), came into force in 2000. Its main aim is to challenge segregation in housing and to strengthen solidarity among citizens. It promotes a tenure mix through legal requirements: in urban areas, every commune should reach a minimum of 20 per cent social housing in its housing stock before 2020. This paper attempts to explain why policy makers believe in the virtues of a tenure mix. The second aim is to assess the discrepancies between the rhetorical level of policy aims and the pragmatic level of policy outputs, raising methodological issues on the relevance of the communal scale for the measure of segregation and social mix. The conclusion raises paradoxical issues: social class segmentation resists social mixing more strongly than ethnic segmentation; the French social mix policy strengthens ghettos and hinders the right to decent housing for the very poor.

63 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors link integration and exclusion as a social transaction process and outline how this theoretical framework is applicable to the housing field, particularly in relation to the management of the HLM sector in France.
Abstract: Nowadays in France, a political rhetoric highlights the 'excluded' and aims to reduce 'social fracture'. Most sociologists react negatively to this stance and propose alternative concepts to exclusion, such as 'disaffiliation' and 'disqualification'. This paper links together integration and exclusion as a social transaction process and outlines how this theoretical framework is applicable to the housing field. It identifies some implications for housing policy, particularly in relation to the management of the HLM sector in France.

43 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a new pattern is emerging: the very poor and the deprived are in the most dilapidated fraction of social housing, and social tenants are still second class citizens.
Abstract: Traditionally, French social housing was housing low‐paid workers with a regular job. The very poor were in private dilapidated housing. Today a new pattern is emerging: the very poor and the deprived are in the most dilapidated fraction of social housing. Far from improving their social integration, dilapidated social housing estates are stigmatizing them. Social tenants are still second‐class citizens.

18 citations

27 Jan 2012
TL;DR: In this paper, the metaphore de la projection au sol des rapports sociaux, le spatial prime sur le social, mais leur relation is dialectique, avec des effets en retour.
Abstract: Les inegalites sociales ont necessairement une traduction spatiale. Mais la notion mathematique de projection a un caractere mecanique et simplificateur. Dans la metaphore de la projection au sol des rapports sociaux, le spatial prime sur le social, mais leur relation est dialectique, avec des effets en retour. La mixite sociale est une politique consensuelle qui vise a reduire les inegalites sociales en intervenant sur l’espace. Ce texte a deux objectifs : montrer comment la mixite sociale est prise dans des contradictions et produit des effets pervers. Ensuite, esquisser comment le paradigme de la transaction sociale permet une conceptualisation plus satisfaisante de la mixite sociale et ouvre des pistes pour le depassement de ses contradictions internes.

5 citations

Book ChapterDOI
14 Aug 2020
TL;DR: In this "inclusive secularism", the so-called God's Law is lower than the Human Law, the only one relevant when debating issues related to our common good as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Born in a family divided by opposite understandings of Catholicism, the author chose first to be a radical social Catholic. He broke with any religion (including the ‘religion of secularism’) and shifted from a social vision to a political one. ‘Active citizenship’ in everyday life admits religions within the political sphere, but as stakeholders equal to others. In this ‘inclusive secularism’, the so-called God’s Law is lower than the Human Law, the only one relevant when debating issues related to our common good. Framing this law is a process of compromises; they are not at all dishonest, but social transactions in a spirit of conciliating the opposed values and interests of every stakeholder.

4 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
Jo Ann Pepe1
TL;DR: The door of Jesus’ tomb closes with the sound of an echoing silence, leaving us with a quandary – where is reality now?

454 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an overview of the explanatory factors of ethnic segregation and spatial concentration in modern welfare states is presented. But, the authors do not consider the effect of economic change and its effects on cities, groups and spatial arrangements.
Abstract: As an introduction to this special issue on ethnic segregation in cities, we offer the readers an overview of the explanatory factors of ethnic segregation and spatial concentration in modern welfare states. After a discussion of the disadvantages and advantages of segregation and concentration, which can be seen as the impetus behind the widespread interest in this topic, we will briefly review some 'traditional' theories. That review will be followed by a closer look at behavioural theories and explanations in which constraints are central. The next section will elaborate on restructuring processes, giving special attention to economic change and its effects on cities, groups and spatial arrangements. We will conclude this introduction with a few remarks on the future of ethnic segregation and concentration and outline some possible directions for future research in this field.

332 citations

Book Chapter
01 Jan 2004

260 citations