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Maximillian Kolbe Domapielle

Bio: Maximillian Kolbe Domapielle is an academic researcher from University of Bradford. The author has contributed to research in topics: Medicine & Health care. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 5 citations.

Papers
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15 Feb 2014
TL;DR: Policy makers and planners need to pay attention to four dimensions of access, including geographic accessibility, availability, affordability, acceptability of services when making decisions regarding health insurance and health care services utilization to ensure that the peculiar needs of the poor are taken on board.
Abstract: There is growing awareness of the fact that illhealth perpetuates poverty. In order to prevent the negative downward spiral of poverty and illness, developing countries in recent years are increasingly implemen ting various models of health insurance to increase access to health care for poor households. While there is consistent evidence that health insurance schemes have caused an increase in access to health generally, the debate regarding the most appropriate health insurance scheme that suits the poor continues unabated. Drawing on relevant literature this paper adopts a framework for assessing access to health care services to explore four dimensions of access, including: geographic accessibility, availability, affordability, acceptability of services. The paper argues that irrespective of the model of health insurance being implemented these dimensions of access govern the poor and the poorest household decisions about enrolling in a health insurance scheme and utilizing health care services. Policy makers and planners need to pay attention to these important dimensions when making decisions regarding health insurance and health care services utilization to ensure that the peculiar needs of the poor are taken on board. Key words: access, developing countries, health insurance models, universal health coverage,

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors examined the contribution of semi-mechanised shea butter processing projects to rural women's income in the communities and found that although farming is the main occupation of the majority of women, shea-based livelihood is higher than the minimum annual wage in Ghana.
Abstract: The shea industry is a self-contained industry, and it is argued that with critical investment in processing machinery and skill training of the primary actors, it can sustainably enhance the livelihoods of poor rural households. Following an investment in semi-mechanised shea butter processing projects in two communities in North-Western Ghana, this study examined the contribution of the projects to rural women’s income in the communities. Data were collected from 156 shea butter producers, using questionnaires, two key informant interviews and two focus group discussions with the executives of the producer associations. The study found that although farming is the main occupation of the majority of women, shea butter processing is the leading sector because it contributes relatively higher to women’s income. Intriguingly, the income from shea-based livelihood is higher than the minimum annual wage in Ghana. This implies that the shea sector has the potential of contributing to household income, just as the formal sector. In order to enhance the role of the sector towards livelihoods, continuous support to the primary actors (women), and the ability to link them to external market remain critical.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that one viable pathway towards achieving UHC is the adoption of an adaptive mix of diverse pooling mechanisms, which is necessary for improving the governance and institutional frameworks for health and ensuring sustained economic growth to respond to the fiscal demands of health systems.
Abstract: Universal Health Coverage (UHC) as a health policy goal is gaining added currency in the policy agendas of many Low and Middle-Income Countries (LMIC) following the onslaught of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The goal of UHC is to ensure that every citizen has access to quality healthcare services that they need without suffering financial hardship. Whereas most industrialised countries have achieved UHC through the implementation of various traditional health financing mechanisms, most LMIC have not made significant progress in providing financial protection against the costs of illness for majority of the population due to limited fiscal space and or lack of political commitment to raise government revenues and increase fiscal space for health. While the onslaught of COVID-19 refreshes the call for reform of countries' health financing policies to reflect the healthcare needs of the population, the debate about the type or combination of health financing models to employ in LMIC has yet to reach a consensus. This review critically analyses five health financing models to ascertain their appropriateness in providing financial risk protection against the cost of illness, especially in this era of COVID-19. Given the limited fiscal space for health in LMICs, we argue that one viable pathway towards achieving UHC is the adoption of an adaptive mix of diverse pooling mechanisms. Moreover, because the creation of fiscal space is context-specific, and UHC is a political issue rather than technical, securing strong political support is necessary for improving the governance and institutional frameworks for health and ensuring sustained economic growth to respond to the fiscal demands of health systems.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results reveal that health facilities in the Wa West district are relatively under-resourced, and this impedes the regularity of supervisory visits compared to the Wa Municipality, and has implications for innovation in the mobilisation of health resources to increase theregularity of facilitation supervision in deprived settings.
Abstract: Aim: Following growing concern about healthcare quality in many developing countries, this article analyses the relationship between facilitative supervision (FS) and the quality of primary healthcare (PHC) services in north-western Ghana. Background: While adherence to the tenets of FS aims to trigger improvement in the quality of PHC services, research has seldom explored this relationship to facilitate effective planning and implementation of PHC services, particularly in deprived areas. Methodology: Based on the implementation of FS in primary health facilities in a district and a municipality in north-western Ghana, a multi-case study approach was employed to collect and analyse the data. Specifically, 52 semi-structured interviews were conducted in the two study settings and the data were analysed using a thematic framework. Observation and secondary analysis were also employed to generate data to triangulate and supplement the interview data. Findings: The results reveal that health facilities in the Wa West district are relatively under-resourced, and this impedes the regularity of supervisory visits compared to the Wa Municipality. This notwithstanding, adherence to the prescriptions of FS is rated by the study participants as moderately satisfactory in both districts, culminating in improvement in the quality of PHC. This finding has implications for innovation in the mobilisation of health resources to increase the regularity of facilitation supervision in deprived settings. We advocate further research to establish whether the marginal improvement in the quality of PHC achieved in the two districts has resulted in an increase in uptake of PHC services to improve the health of the population or not.
Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 2022-Heliyon
TL;DR: In this article , the authors explored the factors that influence the contraceptive decision-making of migrant female head porters in the Kumasi Metropolis and the implications for health policy and planning.

Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 2021-Heliyon
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that the journey towards UHC is not a 'one size fits all' process, but a long-term policy engagement that requires adaptation to the specific socio-cultural and political economy contexts of implementing countries.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
27 Jul 2021
TL;DR: Challenges in healthcare access among vulnerable populations independent of the type of vulnerability are highlighted and the need for stakeholders to work to address access differentials in the NHIS and adopt other innovative care strategies that may have broader applicability for all populations is highlighted.
Abstract: Background. Access to healthcare remains a challenge towards the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals in Ghana. There still remain inequalities in the distribution of health services especially among vulnerable groups despite sustained efforts to strengthen the health system. This study was conducted to analyze access differentials among different vulnerable groups in the context of primary healthcare under a National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana. Methods. This study was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among multilevel participants of vulnerable groups in Kumasi Metropolis: 710 vulnerable people constituting elderly/aged (n = 359), pregnant women (n = 117), head poters (teenage girls who migrated from the northern Ghana mainly to the capital cities of the Ashanti and Greater Accra region to help in carrying of goods for their livelihood) (n = 86), sex workers (n = 75), and other vulnerable groups (people with disabilities and street participants) (n = 73). Data were collected using a semistructured questionnaire. Poisson regression with robust variance was used to access the association between vulnerability and access to healthcare. Results. Close to a fifth, 18.5% of the study respondents were unable to access care at any point in time during the last 12 months. Reasons for the inability to access healthcare included limited funding (69.7%), poor attitude of service providers (7.6%), distance to health centers (8.3%), and religious reasons (6.2%). More than 95% of respondents were insured under the NHIS, but acceptability of service provision under the NHIS was low among the vulnerable groups. In the crude models, pregnant women had lower prevalence of access to medications as compared to the elderly (prevalence ratio (PR): 0.88; 95% CI: 0.80–0.98). Head poters and other vulnerable groups were also less likely to view healthcare as affordable as compared to the elderly. The differences in healthcare access observed were attenuated after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and healthcare-related factors. Conclusions. Despite the introduction of a NHIS in Ghana, this study highlights challenges in healthcare access among vulnerable populations independent of the type of vulnerability. This suggests the need for stakeholders to work to address access differentials in the NHIS and adopt other innovative care strategies that may have broader applicability for all populations.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
08 Aug 2018
TL;DR: It is found that the program brings positive impacts in increasing financial abilities of the beneficiaries, and creating good treatment from the medical workers, yet, low supply side readiness of health infrastructure and service system dilutes the benefits of the program in poverty alleviation.
Abstract: This study analyzes the implementation of the Program of Health Insurance for the Poor in Indonesia, focusing at the advantages and constraints faced by the beneficiaries, through a case study in Purbalingga District. By applying the approach of entitlement within the framework of healthcare access, it is found that the program brings positive impacts in increasing financial abilities of the beneficiaries, and creating good treatment from the medical workers. Yet, low supply side readiness of health infrastructure and service system dilutes the benefits of the program in poverty alleviation. The government of Indonesia is recommended to involve communities and local officers in the enumeration of the beneficiaries, to increase the participation of private healthcare providers in the program, and to establish clear rewards and punishment system for the health workers.

1 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2021
TL;DR: In this paper, a plan created utilizing Salesforce to ensure uncomplicated techniques inside the medical coverage segment is presented, where a programmed part enlistment plan is exhibited in detail to acknowledge less manual work, effective procedure management and to allow direct assistance to every person.
Abstract: Popular arrangements emerge with anticipated cutting edge innovations during this cloud world. Salesforce advancement, which is an exceptional float these days, has been extraordinarily helpful to small, medium, and huge estimated associations. Being an unmistakable industry, medicinal services like a few unique enterprises must advance to fulfill the requests of the computerized age in every area, especially health care coverage, patient data. To accomplish this assignment, health insurance has been inviting Salesforce for its assistance. This paper examines a plan created utilizing Salesforce to ensure uncomplicated techniques inside the medical coverage segment. Starting with the point of the errand, the paper diagrams the strategies, highlights, and edges of the anticipated framework. To acknowledge less manual work, effective procedure management and to allow direct assistance to every person, a programmed part enlistment plan is exhibited in detail. The paper incorporates the structure plan and a top-level perspective on some eye-catching alternatives for additional upgrades.