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Megan Scudellari

Bio: Megan Scudellari is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Coronavirus & Drug development. The author has an hindex of 13, co-authored 18 publications receiving 552 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
05 Aug 2020-Nature
TL;DR: This coronavirus is here for the long haul — here’s what scientists predict for the next months and years.
Abstract: This coronavirus is here for the long haul — here’s what scientists predict for the next months and years. This coronavirus is here for the long haul — here’s what scientists predict for the next months and years.

187 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
16 Jun 2016-Nature
TL;DR: Induced pluripotent stem cells were supposed to herald a medical revolution but ten years after their discovery, they are transforming biological research instead.
Abstract: Induced pluripotent stem cells were supposed to herald a medical revolution. But ten years after their discovery, they are transforming biological research instead.

106 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
28 Jul 2021-Nature
TL;DR: In this article, the authors unpacked the life cycle of SARS-CoV-2 and how the virus uses tricks to evade detection and showed that the virus can evade detection.
Abstract: Scientists are unpicking the life cycle of SARS-CoV-2 and how the virus uses tricks to evade detection. Scientists are unpicking the life cycle of SARS-CoV-2 and how the virus uses tricks to evade detection.

98 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
22 Jan 2015-Nature
TL;DR: By splicing animals together, scientists have shown that young blood rejuvenates old tissues, and now they are testing whether it works for humans.
Abstract: By splicing animals together, scientists have shown that young blood rejuvenates old tissues. Now, they are testing whether it works for humans.

58 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
17 Dec 2015-Nature
TL;DR: False beliefs and wishful thinking about the human experience are common and they are hurting people — and holding back science.
Abstract: False beliefs and wishful thinking about the human experience are common. They are hurting people — and holding back science.

49 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The progress in applications of iPSC technology that are particularly relevant to drug discovery and regenerative medicine are discussed, and the remaining challenges and the emerging opportunities in the field are considered.
Abstract: Since the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology a decade ago, human iPSCs have been widely used for disease modelling, drug discovery and cell therapy development. This article discusses progress in applications of iPSC technology that are particularly relevant to drug discovery and regenerative medicine, including the powerful combination of human iPSC technology with recent developments in gene editing.

985 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the impacts and challenges of COVID-19 pandemics on energy demand and consumption and highlights energy-related lessons and emerging opportunities are discussed. But, although the overall energy demand declines, the spatial and temporal variations are complicated.

283 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This Perspective summarizes the most recent developments in the bioprinting of cartilage, bone and skin for clinical applications, and discusses translational challenges and opportunities in the fabrication of complex 3D-printed tissues and organs.
Abstract: 3D-printed orthopaedic devices and surgical tools, printed maxillofacial implants and other printed acellular devices have been used in patients. By contrast, bioprinted living cellular constructs face considerable translational challenges. In this Perspective, we first summarize the most recent developments in 3D bioprinting for clinical applications, with a focus on how 3D-printed cartilage, bone and skin can be designed for individual patients and fabricated using the patient's own cells. We then discuss key translational considerations, such as the need to ensure close integration of the living device with the patient's vascular network, the development of biocompatible bioinks and the challenges in deriving a physiologically relevant number of cells. Lastly, we outline untested regulatory pathways, as well as logistical challenges in material sourcing, manufacturing, standardization and transportation.

264 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
15 Jun 2017-Cancer
TL;DR: Despite the common etiologic role of HPV in the development of cervical cancer and HPV‐associated OPC, great disparity exists between incidence, screening modalities, treatment, and prevention in these 2 very distinct cohorts.
Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes greater than 5% of cancers worldwide, including all cervical cancers and an alarmingly increasing proportion of oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs). Despite markedly reduced cervical cancer incidence in industrialized nations with organized screening programs, cervical cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide, as developing countries lack resources for universal, high-quality screening. In the United States, HPV-related OPC is only 1 of 5 cancers with a rising incidence since 1975 and now has taken over the cervix as the most common site of HPV-related cancer. Similar trends follow throughout North America and Europe. The need for early detection and prevention is paramount. Despite the common etiologic role of HPV in the development of cervical cancer and HPV-associated OPC, great disparity exists between incidence, screening modalities (or lack thereof), treatment, and prevention in these 2 very distinct cohorts. These differences in cervical cancer and HPV-associated OPC and their impact are discussed here. Cancer 2017;123:2219-2229. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

250 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Javier Egea, Isabel Fabregat1, Yves Frapart2, Pietro Ghezzi3  +148 moreInstitutions (57)
TL;DR: The European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) provides an ideal framework to establish multi-disciplinary research networks and EU-ROS represents a consortium of researchers from different disciplines who are dedicated to providing new insights and tools for better understanding redox biology and medicine.
Abstract: The European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) provides an ideal framework to establish multi-disciplinary research networks COST Action BM1203 (EU-ROS) represents a consortium of researchers from different disciplines who are dedicated to providing new insights and tools for better understanding redox biology and medicine and, in the long run, to finding new therapeutic strategies to target dysregulated redox processes in various diseases This report highlights the major achievements of EU-ROS as well as research updates and new perspectives arising from its members The EU-ROS consortium comprised more than 140 active members who worked together for four years on the topics briefly described below The formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) is an established hallmark of our aerobic environment and metabolism but RONS also act as messengers via redox regulation of essential cellular processes The fact that many diseases have been found to be associated with oxidative stress established the theory of oxidative stress as a trigger of diseases that can be corrected by antioxidant therapy However, while experimental studies support this thesis, clinical studies still generate controversial results, due to complex pathophysiology of oxidative stress in humans For future improvement of antioxidant therapy and better understanding of redox-associated disease progression detailed knowledge on the sources and targets of RONS formation and discrimination of their detrimental or beneficial roles is required In order to advance this important area of biology and medicine, highly synergistic approaches combining a variety of diverse and contrasting disciplines are needed

242 citations