scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Mfundo S.T. Maseko

Bio: Mfundo S.T. Maseko is an academic researcher from University of KwaZulu-Natal. The author has contributed to research in topics: Habitat & Occupancy. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 9 publications receiving 58 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the effects of forest fragmentation via measures of patch size and isolation on the taxonomic richness and functional richness of forest bird communities in five Protected Areas within the urban-forest mosaic of the Durban Metropolitan Area, South Africa were described.
Abstract: Loss of habitat area and structural heterogeneity through anthropogenic fragmentation poses a threat to the survival of wildlife, which may be exacerbated by urban pressures. Understanding the underlying ecological processes that influence species’ persistence in fragmented landscapes is vital for conservation. We described the effects of forest fragmentation via measures of patch size and isolation on the taxonomic richness and functional richness of forest bird communities in five Protected Areas within the urban-forest mosaic of the Durban Metropolitan Area, South Africa. We conducted 137 fixed-radius point-count surveys across 41 distinct forest patches during the austral breeding season. We quantified the avian taxonomic, guild and functional richness and measured at each survey patch. We measured the influence of patch size, Euclidean isolation distance, patch shape and habitat configuration (i.e. habitat amount) on each diversity measure. We then conducted a series of General Linear Models to determine how fragmentation and patch configuration influenced the diversity of forest birds. The explanatory variables in the top models had a significant effect on all avian diversity measures but habitat amount did not. The amount of habitat surrounding a patch was not significant for measures of bird diversity but based on the Akaike’s weight it was important for specialist species. Isolation distance did not have a significant effect on the measures of bird diversity. An increase in patch shape index increased species richness. These results show the importance of large forest fragments/patches for the conservation of forest birds and for maintaining ecosystem functioning and services of forests in increasingly urbanising landscapes, to the benefit of the environment and its human population.

28 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the presence and habitat use of a terrestrial avian species, the Crested Guinea-fowl (Guttera edouardi), in iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa, a PA with varying land use change.
Abstract: Globally anthropogenic pressures on natural environments have caused species decline. Ground dwelling bird species declined in numbers because of loss of habitat and nesting sites. Protected areas (PAs) are generally perceived as areas with little disturbance; however, many have/are also subjected to anthropogenic land use change, such as agroforestry. Consequently, we investigated the presence and habitat use of a terrestrial avian species, the Crested Guinea-fowl (Guttera edouardi), in iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa, a PA with varying land use change. We used single-season camera trap data from 99 trap stations across 24 days, and single season occupancy models to quantify the influence of habitat conversion and habitat characteristics on occupancy and detection probability of Crested Guinea-fowl. The average site occupancy (±standard error) and detection probability (±standard error) under the variable influence was 0.40 ± 0.07 and 0.43 ± 0.06 respectively from the top models. The most influential variables were natural forests, shrub cover, leaf litter, weed dominance, distance to water and narrow path. The natural forests, weed dominance and shrub cover positively influenced the occupancy of Crested Guinea-fowl. Leaf litter and distance to water had a positive influence on detection probability while narrow path had a negative influence. Our findings highlight the importance of natural forests to the survival of Crested Guinea-fowl in landscapes modified for agroforestry. Management initiatives are mandatory to ensure protection of adequate natural habitat for the conservation of forest specialists.

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the influence of a comprehensive suite of vegetation structures on the taxonomic and functional diversity of avian forest species in five protected forest areas in the urban mosaic of eThekwini Municipality, Durban, South Africa during the austral breeding season of 2016 was investigated.

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the influence of landscape context on species richness of forest mammals in an urban-forest mosaic of the EThekwini Municipality Area, Durban, South Africa was determined.

16 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Preface to the Princeton Landmarks in Biology Edition vii Preface xi Symbols used xiii 1.
Abstract: Preface to the Princeton Landmarks in Biology Edition vii Preface xi Symbols Used xiii 1. The Importance of Islands 3 2. Area and Number of Speicies 8 3. Further Explanations of the Area-Diversity Pattern 19 4. The Strategy of Colonization 68 5. Invasibility and the Variable Niche 94 6. Stepping Stones and Biotic Exchange 123 7. Evolutionary Changes Following Colonization 145 8. Prospect 181 Glossary 185 References 193 Index 201

14,171 citations

BookDOI
TL;DR: Statistical methods in medical research, Statistical methods inmedical research, and statistical methods in scientific research are used in medicine, education and research.
Abstract: Statistical methods in medical research , Statistical methods in medical research , کتابخانه دیجیتال جندی شاپور اهواز

491 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: In this article, the authors studied the effect of variance-stabilizing transformations on the error structure of a Gaussian model, and showed that a transformation of the problem may help to correct some departure from the standard model assumptions.
Abstract: In previous chapters, we have studied the model $$y = A\beta + \epsilon, $$ where the mean Ey = Aβ depends linearly on the parameters β, the errors are normal (Gaussian), and the errors are additive. We have also seen (Chapter 7) that in some situations, a transformation of the problem may help to correct some departure from our standard model assumptions. For example, in §7.3 on variance-stabilising transformations, we transformed our data from y to some function g(y), to make the variance constant (at least approximately). We did not there address the effect on the error structure of so doing. Of course, \(g(y) = g(A\beta + \epsilon )\) as above will not have an additive Gaussian error structure any more, even approximately, in general.

279 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results for the St. Lucia wetlands in South Africa showed that combining Sentinel-1 and -2 led to significantly higher classification accuracies than for using the systems separately, and Sentinel-2 was particularly of value for general wetland delineation, while Sentinel- 1 showed more value for mapping wetland vegetation types.

107 citations