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Mgboawaji Ujile

Bio: Mgboawaji Ujile is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Expansive clay & Leaching (agriculture). The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 3 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the influence of leaching on the physicochemical behaviour and durability of lime-stabilised lateritic soil under continuous water ingress, simulating the typical experience in a tropical environment was evaluated.
Abstract: Lime stabilisation is one of the traditional methods of improving the engineering properties of lateritic soils for use as subgrade and foundation materials for the construction of road pavements and highway embankments. Understanding the mechanical performance of lime-stabilised lateritic subgrades in terms of their durability under continuous water ingress will improve environmental sustainability by conserving scarce natural resources and reducing the environmental impacts of repair and replacement of pavements. However, there are several conflicting reports on the durability of lime-stabilised soils subjected to continuous water ingress and harsh environmental conditions. Therefore, this paper evaluates the influence of leaching on the physicochemical behaviour and durability of lime-stabilised lateritic soil under continuous water ingress, simulating the typical experience in a tropical environment. Variations in the strength and durability of the lateritic soil at various lime contents (0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 15, and 20 wt.%) and soaking periods (3, 7, 14 and 28 days) were evaluated by performing the California bearing ratio tests before and after subjecting the lime-lateritic soil (LLS) samples to continuous leaching using two modified leaching cells. Furthermore, physicochemical analysis was performed to assess the variation of cation concentrations and changes in the physical properties of the pore fluid as the leaching time progressed from 3 to 28 days. The results show that the minimum strength reduction index of the soil corresponds to its lime stabilisation optimum (LSO). Electrical conductivity decreased monotonically and almost uniformly with an increase in leaching time, irrespective of lime content. So, too, was calcium concentration and to a lesser degree for pH and potassium concentration. Adverse changes in the physicochemical behaviour of the LLS samples occurred at lime contents below and slightly above the optimum lime content of the soil. Whereas permanent pozzolanic reactions occurred at lime contents above the LSO and thus resulted in a 45-fold increase in strength and durability. The results are significant for reducing the detrimental effect of the leaching-induced deterioration of flexible pavements founded on tropical floodplains.

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the effect of construction and demolition waste (CDW) in expansive soil stabilization has been investigated and the chemical and mechanical properties of these materials have shown that they are capable of developing compressive strength properties for replacement of cement with significant reduction in carbon emission.
Abstract: Abstract Construction and demolition waste (CDW) are the largest waste products in the world today and competes as a viable recycled additive material in place of natural aggregates. Due to the increase in compressive strength of different mix proportions of CDW, it is also considered for reuse in concrete and subbase construction. This study shows the effect of CDW in expansive soil stabilization. The chemical and mechanical properties of these materials have shown that they are capable of developing compressive strength properties for replacement of cement with significant reduction in carbon emission. The inherent compositional properties of recycled CDW compared in this review suggests that CDW have good filler properties in highly expansive soils. Mixtures of crushed brick and recycled aggregates characterised based on chemical properties of different replacement ratios suggests that CDW of good-quality aggregates reduces swell potential of expansive soils and increased mechanical strength in pavement construction.

1 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A comprehensive review of the literature that is divided into four research areas: evaluation of leaching measurement methods, leaching from recycled asphalt materials, the leaching characteristics of porous asphalt pavements, and waste-modified asphalt mixtures is provided in this paper .

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provided an understanding of the evolution of void ratio of the mixed materials during swelling at three different suction levels upon saturation as well as the soil water retention (SWR) during desaturation.
Abstract: Treated bentonite-rich soils used as liner materials in landfills may provide an effective solution to the problems of increased void ratios upon swelling at reduced suction as well as desiccation cracking when suction is increased during desaturation. Accordingly, this study provides an understanding of the evolution of void ratio of the mixed materials during swelling at three different suction levels upon saturation as well as the soil water retention (SWR) during desaturation. For the treatment process, low quantity of cement binder whose production leverages raw material resources with efficient dry-process kilns and the benefit of lower energy consumption were used. Results indicated increased mixed soils’ strength irrespective of increased fines content due to thixotropy. The mixed soils exhibited almost equal values of void ratios at different hydration stages, suggesting that slightly reduced expansion mostly affects the subsequent phases of moisture ingress at full saturation compared to the natural soils. Lower values of void ratio obtained at full saturation also suggests possible reduced infiltration of water into landfills. The observed increased moisture retention within the osmotic suction zone and a decrease in the same as the fines content increased in the mixed soils can aid contaminant encapsulation while also reducing desiccation cracking. The findings of this research are intended to serve as a benchmark for further studies using other sustainable materials for treatment of mixed soils.

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , 5 mm plus crushed glass was added to the expansive clay subgrade at different percentages (0, 5, 10, 15, and 20%) by dry weight of the clay.

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the effect of varying gypsum concentrations of 0, 3, 6, and 9 wt% on the performance of sulfate soil stabilised with two lime levels (4 and 6 wt%).
Abstract: The role of gypsum level on the long-term strength and expansion of soil stabilised with different lime contents is not well understood. This research, therefore, studied the effect of varying gypsum concentrations of 0, 3, 6, and 9 wt% (equivalent to the sulfate contents of 0, 1.4, 2.8, and 4.2%, respectively) on the performance of sulfate soil stabilised with two lime levels (4 and 6 wt%). This was carried out to establish the threshold level of gypsum/lime (G/L) at which the increase in G/L ratio does not affect the performance of lime-stabilised sulfate soil. Both unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and expansion, along with the derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) analysis, were adopted to accomplish the present objective. Accordingly, the result indicated that the strength and expansion were proportional to the lime and sulfate content, of which a G/L ratio of 1.5 was the optimum case scenario for UCS, and at the same time, the worst-case scenario for expansion. This discovery is vital, as it is anticipated to serve as a benchmark for future research related to the design of effective binders for suppressing the sulfate-induced expansion in lime-stabilised gypseous soil.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors discuss the correlation between railway track elements, failures, and the degradation of embankments in railway networks, and then compare the soil stabilisation techniques from multiple aspects.
Abstract: Railway transportation is one of the most advantageous modes of transportation because of its high capacity, which obviates the increasing demand for conveying passengers and cargo. However, high initial costs and ongoing maintenance costs (partially resulting from the degradation of the subgrade and embankments) are drawbacks. Besides, railway subgrade soil experiences a high impact load and alternate drying-wetting and freeze-thawing cycles. In order to counter these problems, various kinds of soil improvement have been employed to improve the engineering properties of soils and minimise embankment and subgrade degradation. Chemical, mechanical, and geosynthetic techniques are currently being used to improve railway embankments. Some methods, such as columnar systems and deep mixing, fortify embankment foundations or subsoil, while others (e.g. chemical binders) can be used as mixed material to stabilise embankments and subgrade soil to a shallow depth. Hence, this review paper first discusses the correlation between railway track elements, failures, and the degradation of embankments in railway networks, and then compares the soil stabilisation techniques from multiple aspects.

6 citations