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Michael Brooks

Bio: Michael Brooks is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Citizen science & Ornithology. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 23 publications receiving 106 citations.

Papers
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Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the authors make comparisons between SABAP1 and SABABAP2, which is more complex than anticipated at the start of SABA2, making comparisons between the two SABAs.
Abstract: Making comparisons between SABAP1 and SABAP2 is more complex than anticipated at the start of SABAP2...

23 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The objective of this paper is to document a procedure to construct maps which show the changes in bird distribution patterns between the two projects.
Abstract: One of the objectives of the Second Southern African Bird Atlas Project (SABAP2) was to be able to make comparisons with the distribution data collected during the First Southern African Bird Atlas Project (SABAP1); the spatial grid for SABAP2 was set up with a view to facilitating this. Strategies to make these comparisons have proved to be more difficult than were anticipated at the outset of SABAP2 in 2007. The objective of this paper is to document a procedure to construct maps which show the changes in bird distribution patterns between the two projects.

21 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, it was shown that maps on a pentad scale are desirable, and that reporting rates should be shown to represent approximate relative abundance, but reporting rates only be shown for pentads which meet some minimum threshold for coverage, currently taken as four full-protocol checklists.
Abstract: The inference from these considerations is that maps on a pentad scale are desirable, and that reporting rates should be shown to represent approximate relative abundance, but reporting rates should only be shown for pentads which meet some minimum threshold for coverage, currently taken as four full-protocol checklists.

21 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The Second Southern African Bird Atlas Project (SABAP2) as discussed by the authors started on 1 July 2007 and has been completed nine years of fieldwork for the project by 30 June 2016.
Abstract: The Second Southern African Bird Atlas Project (SABAP2) started on 1 July 2007. On 30 June 2016, nine years of fieldwork for the project had been completed. This paper shows the year-by-year coverage maps, and reviews regional progress after nine years. Finally, it describes the priorities for each of the project's 11 organisational regions for the 10th year of the project.

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: One of the largest citizen science projects in Africa is the Second Southern African Bird Atlas Project (SABAP2) as discussed by the authors , which is a follow-up project of SABAP.
Abstract: One of the largest citizen science projects in Africa is the Second Southern African Bird Atlas Project (SABAP2). SABAP2 is a follow-up project of the Southern African Bird Atlas Project (now labelled SABAP). The primary data collection period for the first bird atlas project was 1987 to 1991;it incorporated data from as far back as 1980, and in some regions included data until 1993, assembling a total of 7.2 million records of bird distribution. SABAP generated the Atlas of Southern African Birds in two volumes. Harrison et al. demonstrated that the SABAP database had become a valuable resource to four main user constituencies: environmental consultants, conservationists, research scientists, and birders. Academic research output (theses and papers) was summarised by Underhill;most of the 102 papers and 19 postgraduate theses listed had been based on SABAP data. Search results were manually scanned for relevance. The 'SABAP' search term alone returned 1190 results;however, as 'sabap' has alternative meanings in other languages, many results were not relevant.

8 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In 2015 and 2016, this paper repeated road transects for raptors across northern Botswana that were first conducted in 1991 and 1995, and explored changes in abundance of 29 species.

28 citations

Dissertation
01 Sep 2016
TL;DR: Thissis (PhD)--University of Pretoria, 2016 is a posthumous publication based on a thesis presented at the 2016 South African Academy of Arts and Sciences (SAAS) convocation, where the author’s dissertation was presented as a stand-alone work.
Abstract: Thesis (PhD)--University of Pretoria, 2016 © 2016 University of Pretoria All rights reserved The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors demonstrate how southern Africa's citizen science-based "early warning system for biodiversity" is used to support land-use planning and conservation decisions, including Red List, strategic and project-based environmental impact assessments and national protected area expansion and implementation strategies.

25 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The objective of this paper is to document a procedure to construct maps which show the changes in bird distribution patterns between the two projects.
Abstract: One of the objectives of the Second Southern African Bird Atlas Project (SABAP2) was to be able to make comparisons with the distribution data collected during the First Southern African Bird Atlas Project (SABAP1); the spatial grid for SABAP2 was set up with a view to facilitating this. Strategies to make these comparisons have proved to be more difficult than were anticipated at the outset of SABAP2 in 2007. The objective of this paper is to document a procedure to construct maps which show the changes in bird distribution patterns between the two projects.

21 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Fencing as a way of managing livestock began in the late 1800s, and by the early twentieth century, it was a popular way to manage livestock in the UK as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Linear structures include fences, roads, railways, canalised water ways and power lines, all man-made. Fencing as a way of managing livestock began in the late 1800s, and by the early twentieth cen...

20 citations