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Michael Eden

Bio: Michael Eden is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Randomness & Modernism (music). The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 2 publications receiving 2 citations.

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TL;DR: In this article, the inclusion of randomness and chance is examined in the writing process with a view to foreground materiality in writing development and execution. And the distinction between randomness, and chance, is clearly drawn.
Abstract: This article attempts to first speculate and then demonstrate how Dada methods can be used by creative practitioners or writers in general within an academic essay. In particular, the inclusion of randomness and chance is examined in the writing process with a view to foreground materiality in writing development and execution. Methods to make use of chance and to randomize text are outlined and the distinction between randomness and chance is clearly drawn. Antecedents to Dada and to the cut-up techniques that form the focus of the method outlined here are examined and offer context for the development of an embodied and empowered approach to challenges encountered around academic writing. Furthermore, contemporary scholarship that reflects on writing in higher education is drawn on to highlight the article’s primary purpose; that being to offer a background, explanation and useful methodology for the inclusion of randomness and chance which addresses the institutional demands encountered by students. The article draws on work created and discussed at a workshop that took place at Central St Martins in 2019, called ‘Breaking Into and Out of Academic Writing’. This workshop included various students from University of Arts London experimenting with the cut-up techniques and discussing their potential use in writing.

1 citations

22 Jun 2018
TL;DR: Another renaissance is needed to break the deadlock of modernism as mentioned in this paper, and Neo-Modernism only needs its own Michelangelo to fuel a return to modernism's core values.
Abstract: Another enlightenment is needed to break the deadlock. Can we have another renaissance? why not, Neo-Modernism only needs its own Michelangelo to fuel a return to modernism's core values.

1 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: This article explored the possibility of considering neo-modernism as a framework concept for studying political processes in the Middle East, including the search for new political unities; the growing demand for projects of the future and for ideology; the creation of a new political mythology; the use of postmodern tools in political practice; and awareness of the fundamental instability of the current state of affairs.
Abstract: This paper explores the possibility of considering neo-modernism as a framework concept for studying political processes in the Middle East. The study starts with an analysis of the notion of neo-modernity as a new way of treating reality that emerged out of postmodernism as a reaction to its totalizing criticism. A comparative analysis of the main publications on the matter has revealed key features of neo-modernism: the ability to avoid postmodern fragmentariness, problematization of values and meanings, and return to metanarratives. In the political realm, these features manifest themselves in five ways: the search for new political unities; the growing demand for projects of the future and for ideology; the creation of a new political mythology; the use of postmodern tools in political practice; and awareness of the fundamental instability of the current state of affairs. The main features of neo-modernism have been scrutinized with reference to the specific Middle Eastern political reality at the regional, national, and RUSSIA IN GLOBAL AFFAIRS 132 Neo-Modernity: A New Framework for Political Reality social levels. This approach has revealed the search for new regional, subregional, and national unities in the Middle East, as well as the creation of new ideologies, often directly related to attempts to devise new national development strategies, and the emergence (and sometimes deliberate engineering) of new elements of political mythologies.

5 citations