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Michael H. Dodgeon

Bio: Michael H. Dodgeon is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Armenian & Hebrew. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 216 citations.
Topics: Armenian, Hebrew

Papers
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TL;DR: In the third century, the crisis of the Roman Republic was characterized by an increasing variety of hostile peoples from outside its frontiers as mentioned in this paper. But the available sources for its history have to be compiled from a wide variety of sources, and the least adequate are those in Latin, the imperial lives of the Historia Augusta.
Abstract: The crisis of the third century saw Rome not only embroiled in contests of succeeding short-lived Emperors, but assailed by an increasing variety of hostile peoples from outside its frontiers. Owing to the complex racial interplay of this period, the sources for its history have to be compiled from a wide variety of sources. The least adequate are those in Latin, the imperial lives of the Historia Augusta . These have to be supplemented by the Greek chronicles of Zosimus and John Malalas of Antioch, as well as the Armenian history of Moses of Chorene, the Arabic History of the Arabs of Al-Tabari , as well as inscriptions in Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Syrian and other languages. This volume collects these diverse sources for the first time in English translation, and will be a uniquely valuable resource for scholars working on a period of Roman history that is attracting increasing attention.

220 citations


Cited by
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BookDOI
30 Jan 2009

287 citations

Book
13 Aug 1999
TL;DR: Elam: what, when, where, environment, climate, and resources as mentioned in this paper The immediate precursors of Elam 4. Elam and Awan 5. The dynasty of Shimashki 6. The kingdom of Susa and Anshan 8. The Neo-Elamite period 9. Elymais 11. Eemen under the Sasanians and beyond 12. Conclusion
Abstract: 1. Elam: what, when, where? 2. Environment, climate, and resources 3. The immediate precursors of Elam 4. Elam and Awan 5. The dynasty of Shimashki 6. The grand regents of Elam and Susa 7. The kingdom of Susa and Anshan 8. The Neo-Elamite period 9. Elam in the Achaemenid empire 10. Elymais 11. Elam under the Sasanians and beyond 12. Conclusion.

182 citations

DOI
01 Dec 1997
TL;DR: In the provinces the architectural and art forms characteristic of the Flavian era continued to flourish as mentioned in this paper and Dynamism returned to imperial commissions with the Romano-Spanish Trajan, who was able to impress upon it his own many-sided personality: ruler, philhellene, architect, dilettante, poet, traveller and romantic.
Abstract: Greek artefacts, craftsmen and artists had penetrated Rome since regal days; from the second century BC this trickle had become a continuing and influential flood, contributing together with Italic and Etruscan architecture and art, and the developing central Italian and Roman concrete architecture, to the rich tapestry of the art of the capital. Vespasian (69-79), founder of the Flavian dynasty, showed an astute pragmatism in his handling of architecture and art. In the provinces the architectural and art forms characteristic of the Flavian era continued to flourish. Dynamism returned to imperial commissions with the Romano-Spanish Trajan. The age of Hadrian (117-38) proved to be extraordinary, largely because of the extent to which he was able to impress upon it his own many-sided personality: ruler, philhellene, architect, dilettante, poet, traveller and romantic. The rich artistic harvest of the Flavian to the Antonine ages was not just an imperial, but a corporate achievement, one which offered a worthy inheritance to following generations.

172 citations

Book
13 Sep 2007
TL;DR: Rome and Iran to the beginning of the third century AD as mentioned in this paper, a chronological survey of the Sasanian Empire and its relations with the Roman Empire, is presented in this book.
Abstract: Part I. Narrative: 1. Rome and Iran to the beginning of the third century AD 2. Rome and the Sasanian Empire - a chronological survey Part II. Sources and Contexts: 3. Political goals 4. Warfare 5. Military confrontations 6. The diplomatic solutions 7. Arabia between the great powers 8. Shared interests - continuing conflicts 9. Religion - Christianity and Zoroastrianism 10. Emperor and King of Kings 11. Exchange of information between West and East Part III. Appendices.

132 citations