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Michael H. Fisher

Other affiliations: Western Washington University
Bio: Michael H. Fisher is an academic researcher from Oberlin College. The author has contributed to research in topics: Empire & Colonialism. The author has an hindex of 15, co-authored 51 publications receiving 1153 citations. Previous affiliations of Michael H. Fisher include Western Washington University.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: Fisher's new book, Counterflows to Colonialism: Indian Travellers and Settlers in Britain, 1600-1857, details the diverse experiences of South Asians in Britain this article.
Abstract: While reading Michael Fisher's new book, Counterflows to Colonialism: Indian Travellers and Settlers in Britain, 1600–1857, which details the diverse experiences of South Asians in Britain, I often found myself reminded of Tayeb Salih's 1969 novel Season of Migration to the North.(1) The figure at the heart of this remarkable story, originally written in Arabic, is Mustafa Sa'eed, a man who leaves his native Sudan to attend school first in Cairo, then in London, where he eventually becomes lecturer in economics. It has been argued that Mustafa's journey northward, and his turbulent life in Britain, should be seen as an attempt to reverse the dominant 'flow' of European imperialism, and that the novel itself effectively presents a postcolonial 'counter-narrative' to the paradigmatic account of the European imperial project, Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness (the narrative within Season of Migration is recounted from along the banks of the river Nile, rather than upon the river Thames, for example).(2)

131 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored and analyzed instances of everyday resistance in South Asian history and society, covering groups from peasants to urban labourers, and from women to merchants, and depicted the processes of nonconfrontational behaviour which contest existing structures of power.
Abstract: Historians, sociologists and political scientists have long been interested in riots, rebellions and revolutions. More recently, however, they have focused attention upon quieter, less dramatic confrontations between oppressors and the oppressed. They have pointed out that resistance can occur in "everday" forms. The specific shapes of everyday resistance are both determined by, and an aspect of, various socio-economic and cultural practices. The present volume explores and analyzes instances of everyday resistance in South Asian history and society. The eight essays cover groups from peasants to urban labourers, and from women to merchants. Several of the essays use unconventional sources and methods to supplement archival research while depicting the processes of the sorts of non-confrontational behaviour which contest existing structures of power. Seen as a whole, the volume suggests that the notion of resistance can be rethought and extended to take in and understand large areas of social activity.

126 citations

Book
01 Jan 1991
TL;DR: The authors studied the origins, growth and function of the Residency system in India between 1760 and 1857, in particular the composition of three groups: British residents, Indian rulers and the Indian staff of the residencies.
Abstract: This study concentrates on the origins, growth and function of the Residency system in India between 1760 and 1857, in particular the composition of three groups: British residents, Indian rulers and the Indian staff of the residencies. By studying the entire body of residents and political agents - their backgrounds, careers, strategies and tactics - the author attempts to provide a portrait of the men who carried out indirect rule over the major portion of India.

81 citations


Cited by
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Book
06 Apr 2005
TL;DR: The Politics of Nature and the Making of Environmental Subjects as discussed by the authors is a series of articles about the creation of forests and the role of government in the creation and management of forests. But it is not a comprehensive survey of the field.
Abstract: About the Series ix Preface and Acknowledgments xi 1. Introduction: The Politics of Nature and the Making of Environmental Subjects 1 Part I: Power/Knowledge and the Creation of Forests 25 2. Forests of Statistics: Colonial Environmental Knowledges 32 3. Struggles over Kumaon's Forests, 1815-1916 65 Part II: A New Technology of Environmental Government: Politics, Institutions, and Subjectivities 87 4. Governmentalized Localities: The Dispersal of Regulation 101 5. Inside the Regulatory Community 127 6. Making Environmental Subjects: Intimate Government 164 7. Conclusion: The Analytics of Environmentality 201 Notes 231 Bibliography 279 Index 309

1,201 citations

BookDOI
31 Jan 2003
TL;DR: The economics of growth has come a long way since it regained center stage for economists in the mid-1980s as mentioned in this paper, and there is a series of country studies guided by that research.
Abstract: The economics of growth has come a long way since it regained center stage for economists in the mid-1980s. Here for the first time is a series of country studies guided by that research. The thirteen essays, by leading economists, shed light on some of the most important growth puzzles of our time. How did China grow so rapidly despite the absence of full-fledged private property rights? What happened in India after the early 1980s to more than double its growth rate? How did Botswana and Mauritius avoid the problems that other countries in sub--Saharan Africa succumbed to? How did Indonesia manage to grow over three decades despite weak institutions and distorted microeconomic policies and why did it suffer such a collapse after 1997? What emerges from this collective effort is a deeper understanding of the centrality of institutions. Economies that have performed well over the long term owe their success not to geography or trade, but to institutions that have generated market-oriented incentives, protected property rights, and enabled stability. However, these narratives warn against a cookie-cutter approach to institution building. The contributors are Daron Acemoglu, Maite Careaga, Gregory Clark, J. Bradford DeLong, Georges de Menil, William Easterly, Ricardo Hausmann, Simon Johnson, Daniel Kaufmann, Massimo Mastruzzi, Ian W. McLean, Lant Pritchett, Yingyi Qian, James A. Robinson, Devesh Roy, Arvind Subramanian, Alan M. Taylor, Jonathan Temple, Barry R. Weingast, Susan Wolcott, and Diego Zavaleta.

702 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus first on establishing democratic local government and apply multiple accountability measures, in addition to elections, to support democratic local institutions; engage local populations by transferring discretionary powers before transferring management burdens; transfer powers before capacity building; and shift from an oversight and management-planing model to a minimum-standards model in order to help create greater local autonomy nested within national objectives.
Abstract: Decentralisation reforms are taking place across Africa. In decentralisation concerning natural resources, local institutions being chosen to receive powers and the degree and form of power transfers, however, do not establish conditions for more efficient or equitable use and management. A combination of locally accountable representation and discretionary powers are also needed. This combined condition is rarely established. Alternative local institutions are chosen even when democratic local bodies exist. This choice and the failure to transfer discretionary powers can undermine local democratic bodies and concentrate powers in the executive branch. The choices being made around natural resources appear to reflect a broad resistance of central governments to local democratisation and decentralisation of powers. Five measures may ameliorate the situation: (1) focus first on establishing democratic local government; (2) apply multiple accountability measures, in addition to elections, to support democratic local institutions; (3) engage local populations by transferring discretionary powers before transferring management burdens; (4) transfer powers before capacity building; and (5) shift from an oversight and management-planing model to a minimum-standards model in order to help create greater local autonomy nested within national objectives. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

361 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Larson et al. as discussed by the authors presented the first volume of the Bellagio Conference on Governance and Environment in Latin America, which was sponsored by the Rockefeller Foundation and the World Resources Institute.
Abstract: Anne M. Larson is a Research Associate at the Center for International Forestry Research and Nitlapan Institute for Research and Development, Managua, Nicaragua. Jesse C. Ribot is a Senior Associate at the Institutions and Governance Program, World Resources Institute (WRI), Washington, DC. They are indebted to the Rockefeller Foundation for providing the funds and an inspiring venue for the conference at Bellagio, at which the papers in this volume were first presented. They wish to express their thanks to: the Africa Bureau of USAID for funding much of the background research for the Africa contributions to this project and for supporting many of the Bellagio participants; Jon Anderson at the Africa Bureau of USAID for encouraging critical thinking, policy research and outreach on governance issues at the frontier between environment and democracy; David Kaimowitz at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) in Bogor, Indonesia, for contributing CIFOR’s experience and in-depth research to the Bellagio meeting by generously financing several CIFOR participants, and for supporting the research behind the Latin American cases in this volume; the South Africa office of the Ford Foundation for generously supporting the final stages of this publication; Judy Butler for diligent copy-editing; Catherine Benson for logistical support; and Peter G. Veit at WRI for being supportive of this project throughout. They also acknowledge the key role of the anonymous peer reviewers.

301 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Matthew Lange1
TL;DR: This article investigated the developmental legacies of British colonial rule and found that indirect colonial rule is strongly and negatively related to several different indicators of postcolonial political development while controlling for other factors, and provided evidence that the present levels of political development among former British colonies have historical roots and have been shaped by the extent to which they were ruled either directly or indirectly during the colonial period.

289 citations