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Michael Holquist

Bio: Michael Holquist is an academic researcher from Yale University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Dialogic & Poetics. The author has an hindex of 15, co-authored 33 publications receiving 15234 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1986
TL;DR: Holquist as mentioned in this paper discusses the history of realism and the role of the Bildungsroman in the development of the novel in Linguistics, philosophy, and the human sciences.
Abstract: Note on Translation Introduction by Michael Holquist Response to a Question from the Novy Mir Editorial Staff The Bildungsroman and Its Significance in the History of Realism (Toward a Historical Typology of the Novel) The Problem of Speech Genres The Problem of the Text in Linguistics, Philology, and the Human Sciences: An Experiment in Philosophical Analysis From Notes Made in 1970-71 Toward a Methodology for the Human Sciences Index

5,295 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Holquist as mentioned in this paper discusses the history of realism and the role of the Bildungsroman in the development of the novel in Linguistics, philosophy, and the human sciences.
Abstract: Note on Translation Introduction by Michael Holquist Response to a Question from the Novy Mir Editorial Staff The Bildungsroman and Its Significance in the History of Realism (Toward a Historical Typology of the Novel) The Problem of Speech Genres The Problem of the Text in Linguistics, Philology, and the Human Sciences: An Experiment in Philosophical Analysis From Notes Made in 1970-71 Toward a Methodology for the Human Sciences Index

2,824 citations

Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: For instance, the authors argues that while work from different periods in Bakhtin's life is highly varied, there is a discernible shape to his achievement as a whole, and it is this commitment to the concept of dialogue that provides coherence in his contributions to a wide variety of disciplines.
Abstract: Mikhail Bakhtin's ideas - on the dialogic nature of language, the carnivalesque, the nature of the novel, outsideness and answerability - have gained currency in literary studies, anthropology, linguistics, psychology and social theory. Each discipline offers its own version of Bakhtin's legacy, but none, Michael Holquist suggests, can serve as an adequate basis for understanding the overall significance of Bakhtin's writings. Dialogism will provide this basis: Michael Holquist draws on all of Bakhtin's writings known to exist, including Soviet archive material, to provide a comprehensive account of his whole oeuvre. Holquist argues that while work from different periods in Bakhtin's life is highly varied, there is a discernible shape to his achievement as a whole. The key to Bakhtin's distinctiveness is, Holquist suggests, his commitment to the concept of dialogue, and it is this commitment which provides coherence in the contributions Bakhtin makes to a wide variety of disciplines. Dialogism examines Bakhtin's dialogue with other thinkers - for example, Saussure, Freud, Marx and Lukacs, as well as other figures in the history of thinking about dialogue whose connectio with Bakhtin's work have previously been ignored.

1,283 citations


Cited by
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Book
18 Jul 2003
TL;DR: Part 1: Social Analysis, Discourse Analysis, Text Analysis 1. Introduction 2. Texts, Social Events, and Social Practices 3. Intertextuality and Assumptions Part 2: Genres and Action 4. Genres 5. Meaning Relations between Sentences and Clauses 6. Discourses 8. Representations of Social Events Part 4: Styles and Identities 9. Modality and Evaluation 11. Conclusion
Abstract: Part 1: Social Analysis, Discourse Analysis, Text Analysis 1. Introduction 2. Texts, Social Events, and Social Practices 3. Intertextuality and Assumptions Part 2: Genres and Action 4. Genres 5. Meaning Relations between Sentences and Clauses 6. Types of Exchange, Speech Functions, and Grammatical Mood Part 3: Discourses and Representations 7. Discourses 8. Representations of Social Events Part 4: Styles and Identities 9. Styles 10. Modality and Evaluation 11. Conclusion

6,407 citations

MonographDOI
01 Dec 2014
TL;DR: This chapter discusses the emergence of learning activity as a historical form of human learning and the zone of proximal development as the basic category of expansive research.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. The emergence of learning activity as a historical form of human learning 3. The zone of proximal development as the basic category of expansive research 4. The instruments of expansion 5. Toward an expansive methodology 6. Epilogue.

5,768 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined the concept of expansive learning with the help of four questions: 1. Who are the subjects of learning, 2. Why do they learn, 3. What do they teach, and 4. How do they train?
Abstract: Cultural-historical activity theory has evolved through three generations of research. The emerging third generation of activity theory takes two interacting activity systems as its minimal unit of analysis, inviting us to focus research efforts on the challenges and possibilities of inter-organizational learning. Activity theory and its concept of expansive learning are examined with the help of four questions: 1. Who are the subjects of learning? 2. Why do they learn? 3. What do they learn? 4. How do they learn? Five central principles of activity theory are presented, namely activity system as unit of analysis, multi-voicedness of activity, historicity of activity, contradictions as driving force of change in activity, and expansive cycles as possible form of transformation in activity. Together the four questions and five principles form a matrix which is used to present a study of expansive learning in a hospital setting in Finland. In conclusion, implications of the framework for our understanding o...

3,701 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued and present evidence that great apes understand the basics of intentional action, but they still do not participate in activities involving joint intentions and attention (shared intentionality), and children's skills of shared intentionality develop gradually during the first 14 months of life.
Abstract: We propose that the crucial difference between human cognition and that of other species is the ability to participate with others in collaborative activities with shared goals and intentions: shared intentionality. Participation in such activities requires not only especially powerful forms of intention reading and cultural learning, but also a unique motivation to share psychological states with oth- ers and unique forms of cognitive representation for doing so. The result of participating in these activities is species-unique forms of cultural cognition and evolution, enabling everything from the creation and use of linguistic symbols to the construction of social norms and individual beliefs to the establishment of social institutions. In support of this proposal we argue and present evidence that great apes (and some children with autism) understand the basics of intentional action, but they still do not participate in activities involving joint intentions and attention (shared intentionality). Human children's skills of shared intentionality develop gradually during the first 14 months of life as two ontogenetic pathways intertwine: (1) the general ape line of understanding others as animate, goal-directed, and intentional agents; and (2) a species-unique motivation to share emotions, experience, and activities with other persons. The develop- mental outcome is children's ability to construct dialogic cognitive representations, which enable them to participate in earnest in the collectivity that is human cognition.

3,660 citations