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Michael J. Johnson

Bio: Michael J. Johnson is an academic researcher from University of Texas at Austin. The author has contributed to research in topics: Boundary representation & Computer Aided Design. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 4 publications receiving 428 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a survey of telephone openings in language and social interaction: Vol. 24, No. 1-4, pp. 369-387, with a focus on telephone openings.
Abstract: (1990). Universals and particulars in telephone openings. Research on Language and Social Interaction: Vol. 24, No. 1-4, pp. 369-387.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A semi-automatic frame-field guided parameterization approach that converts trimmed B-rep geometry to conforming, watertight analysis-suitable NURBS, and proposes specialized constraints that incorporate properties of an analytical solution that resolve the poor behavior near singularities.

23 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors used an unsteady Navier-Stokes solver within an isogeometric analysis framework to predict contralateral stroke in a pediatric MMD patient with an occlusion in the right middle cerebral artery.
Abstract: Moyamoya disease (MMD) is characterized by narrowing of the distal internal carotid artery and the circle of Willis (CoW) and leads to recurring ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. A retrospective review of data from 50 pediatric MMD patients revealed that among the 24 who had a unilateral stroke and were surgically treated, 11 (45.8%) had a subsequent, contralateral stroke. There is no reliable way to predict these events. After a pilot study in Acta−/− mice that have features of MMD, we hypothesized that local hemodynamics are predictive of contralateral strokes and sought to develop a patient-specific analysis framework to noninvasively assess this stroke risk. A pediatric MMD patient with an occlusion in the right middle cerebral artery and a right-sided stroke, who was surgically treated and then had a contralateral stroke, was selected for analysis. By using an unsteady Navier–Stokes solver within an isogeometric analysis framework, blood flow was simulated in the CoW model reconstructed from the patient’s postoperative imaging data, and the results were compared with those from an age- and sex-matched control subject. A wall shear rate (WSR) > 60,000 s−1 (about 12 × higher than the coagulation threshold of 5000 s−1 and 9 × higher than control) was measured in the terminal left supraclinoid artery; its location coincided with that of the subsequent postsurgical left-sided stroke. A parametric study of disease progression revealed a strong correlation between the degree of vascular morphology altered by MMD and local hemodynamic environment. The results suggest that an occlusion in the CoW could lead to excessive contralateral WSRs, resulting in thromboembolic ischemic events, and that WSR could be a predictor of future stroke.

3 citations


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Book
06 Apr 2010
TL;DR: The Promise of Happiness as mentioned in this paper is a critique of the imperative to be happy, which is defined as the expectation that we will be made happy by taking part in that which is deemed good, and that by being happy ourselves, we will make others happy.
Abstract: The Promise of Happiness is a provocative cultural critique of the imperative to be happy. It asks what follows when we make our desires and even our own happiness conditional on the happiness of others: “I just want you to be happy”; “I’m happy if you’re happy.” Combining philosophy and feminist cultural studies, Sara Ahmed reveals the affective and moral work performed by the “happiness duty,” the expectation that we will be made happy by taking part in that which is deemed good, and that by being happy ourselves, we will make others happy. Ahmed maintains that happiness is a promise that directs us toward certain life choices and away from others. Happiness is promised to those willing to live their lives in the right way. Ahmed draws on the intellectual history of happiness, from classical accounts of ethics as the good life, through seventeenth-century writings on affect and the passions, eighteenth-century debates on virtue and education, and nineteenth-century utilitarianism. She engages with feminist, antiracist, and queer critics who have shown how happiness is used to justify social oppression, and how challenging oppression causes unhappiness. Reading novels and films including Mrs. Dalloway, The Well of Loneliness, Bend It Like Beckham, and Children of Men, Ahmed considers the plight of the figures who challenge and are challenged by the attribution of happiness to particular objects or social ideals: the feminist killjoy, the unhappy queer, the angry black woman, and the melancholic migrant. Through her readings she raises critical questions about the moral order imposed by the injunction to be happy.

2,232 citations

Book
15 Jan 2007
TL;DR: In this article, Schegloff introduced the findings and theories of conversation analysis and provided a complete and authoritative 'primer' in the subject. The topic of this first volume is "sequence organization" -the ways in which turns-at-talk are ordered and combined to make actions take place in conversation, such as requests, offers, complaints, and announcements.
Abstract: Much of our daily lives are spent talking to one another, in both ordinary conversation and more specialized settings such as meetings, interviews, classrooms, and courtrooms. It is largely through conversation that the major institutions of our society - economy, religion, politics, family and law - are implemented. This book Emanuel Schegloff, the first in a series and first published in 2007, introduces the findings and theories of conversation analysis. Together, the volumes in the series constitute a complete and authoritative 'primer' in the subject. The topic of this first volume is 'sequence organization' - the ways in which turns-at-talk are ordered and combined to make actions take place in conversation, such as requests, offers, complaints, and announcements. Containing many examples from real-life conversations, it will be invaluable to anyone interested in human interaction and the workings of conversation.

1,858 citations

Book
02 Jan 1991

1,377 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors define what it means to be oriented, and how to find our way in a world that acquires new shapes, depending on which way we turn.
Abstract: What does it mean to be oriented? How is it that we come to find our way in a world that acquires new shapes, depending on which way we turn? If we know where we are, when we turn this way or that, then we are oriented. We have our bearings. We know what to do to get to this place or to that. To be oriented is also to be oriented toward certain objects, those that help us find our way. These are the objects we recognize, such that when we face them, we know which way we are facing. They gather on the ground and also create a ground on which we can gather. Yet objects gather quite differently, creating different grounds. What difference does it make what we are oriented toward?

320 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For Native studies, the authors argued that the logics of settler colonialism and decolonization must be queered in order to properly speak to the genocidal present that not only continues to disappear indigenous peoples but reinforces the structures of white supremacy, settler colonisation, and heteropatriarchy that affect all peoples.
Abstract: Queer studies highlights the importance of developing analyses that go beyond identity and representational politics. For Native studies in particular, queer theory points to the possibility of going beyond representing the voices of Native peoples, a project that can quickly become co-opted into providing Native commodities for consumption in the multicultural academic-industrial complex. The subjectless critique of queer theory can assist Native studies in critically interrogating how it could unwittingly re-create colonial hierarchies even within projects of decolonization. This critique also sheds light on how Native peoples function within the colonial imaginary-including the colonial imaginary of scholars and movements that claim to be radical. At the same time, Native studies can build on queer of color critique's engagement with subjectless critique. In the move to go "postidentity," queer theory often reinstantiates a white supremacist, settler colonialism by disappearing the indigenous peoples colonized in this land who become the foils for the emergence of postcolonial, postmodern, diasporic, and queer subjects. With respect to Native studies, even queer of color critique does not necessarily mark how identities are shaped by settler colonialism. Thus a conversation between Native studies and queer theory is important, because the logics of settler colonialism and decolonization must be queered in order to properly speak to the genocidal present that not only continues to disappear indigenous peoples but reinforces the structures of white supremacy, settler colonialism, and heteropatriarchy that affect all peoples.

240 citations