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Michael R. Marrus

Bio: Michael R. Marrus is an academic researcher from University of Toronto. The author has contributed to research in topics: The Holocaust & Antisemitism. The author has an hindex of 16, co-authored 49 publications receiving 1461 citations.

Papers
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Book
05 Sep 1985
TL;DR: The authors traces the growth of this 20th-century phenomenon, and takes a stern view of the international community's apathy towards the vast homeless population, and examines the impact of refugee movements on Great Power diplomacy, and considers the evolution of agencies designed to assist refugees, noting outstanding successes and failures.
Abstract: There have always been homeless people, but only in this century have refugees become an important part of international politics, seriously affecting relations between states. This book traces the growth of this 20th-century phenomenon, and takes a stern view of the international community's apathy towards the vast homeless population. While a considerable portion of the book is devoted to the dislocations of the Nazi era, Professor Marrus also looks at the whole period from the late nineteenth century to the present, depicting the astounding dimensions of the problem. He also examines the impact of refugee movements on Great Power diplomacy, and considers the evolution of agencies designed to assist refugees, noting outstanding successes and failures. The book's thesis is that the huge refugee inundations of the twentieth century in Europe represented a terrible new page in human history, presaging what we see today in parts of the Third World. Readership: students and teachers of modern history and politics, especially European.

252 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The history of Vichy antisemitism in France can be traced to the first steps of the First World War as mentioned in this paper and the strategy of Xavier Vallat, 1941-42.
Abstract: Introdu ction 1. First steps 2. The roots of Vichy antisemitism 3. The strategy of Xavier Vallat, 1941-42 4. The system at work, 1940-42 5. Public opinion 1940-42 6. The turning point: summer 1942 7. The Darquier period, 1942-44 8. Conclusions: the Holocaust in France List of abbreviations Notes Index.

202 citations

Book
01 Jan 1981
TL;DR: The history of Vichy antisemitism in France can be traced to the first steps of the First World War as discussed by the authors and the strategy of Xavier Vallat, 1941-42.
Abstract: Introdu ction 1. First steps 2. The roots of Vichy antisemitism 3. The strategy of Xavier Vallat, 1941-42 4. The system at work, 1940-42 5. Public opinion 1940-42 6. The turning point: summer 1942 7. The Darquier period, 1942-44 8. Conclusions: the Holocaust in France List of abbreviations Notes Index.

172 citations

Book
01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: A wide-ranging synthesis of historical writing on the Jewish Holocaust, covering the contributions of Israeli, American and European scholars on all aspects of the subject is presented in this article, where the authors argue strongly in favour of an understanding of Hitler, Nazism and the Holocaust, as well as of the Jews themselves.
Abstract: A wide-ranging synthesis of historical writing on the Jewish Holocaust, covering the contributions of Israeli, American and European scholars on all aspects of the subject. Individual chapters deal with Jewish resistance, the collaboration or otherwise of non-Jewish populations in countries occupied by the Nazis, the progress of the final solution and the role of the Catholic Church. Steering a course between widely divergent interpretations, Marrus argues strongly in favour of an understanding of Hitler, Nazism and the Holocaust, as well as of the Jews themselves. He sees them operating in response to events and opportunities, and attacks views of the period that rely on the spurious wisdom of hindsight.

157 citations

Book
01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: The Court of International Criminal Tribunal for International Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (COPIN) as mentioned in this paper proposed a framework for the consideration of war crimes and war crimes against humanity.
Abstract: Background - Preparations - The Court - Crimes against Peace - War Crimes - Crimes Against Humanity - Last Words - Assessment - Appendices: - Charges, Verdicts, Sentences - Chronology - Questions for Consideration - Selected Bibliography - Index

121 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Existing evidence supports the hypothesis that the need to belong is a powerful, fundamental, and extremely pervasive motivation, and people form social attachments readily under most conditions and resist the dissolution of existing bonds.
Abstract: A hypothesized need to form and maintain strong, stable interpersonal relationships is evaluated in light of the empirical literature. The need is for frequent, nonaversive interactions within an ongoing relational bond. Consistent with the belongingness hypothesis, people form social attachments readily under most conditions and resist the dissolution of existing bonds. Belongingness appears to have multiple and strong effects on emotional patterns and on cognitive processes. Lack of attachments is linked to a variety of ill effects on health, adjustment, and well-being. Other evidence, such as that concerning satiation, substitution, and behavioral consequences, is likewise consistent with the hypothesized motivation. Several seeming counterexamples turned out not to disconfirm the hypothesis. Existing evidence supports the hypothesis that the need to belong is a powerful, fundamental, and extremely pervasive motivation.

17,492 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors consider the study of undocumented migration as an epistemological, methodological, and political problem, in order to then formulate it as a theoretical problem, and argue that it is necessary also to produce historically informed accounts of the sociopolitical processes of "illegalization" themselves, which can be characterized as the legal production.
Abstract: ▪ Abstract This article strives to meet two challenges. As a review, it provides a critical discussion of the scholarship concerning undocumented migration, with a special emphasis on ethnographically informed works that foreground significant aspects of the everyday life of undocumented migrants. But another key concern here is to formulate more precisely the theoretical status of migrant “illegality” and deportability in order that further research related to undocumented migration may be conceptualized more rigorously. This review considers the study of migrant “illegality” as an epistemological, methodological, and political problem, in order to then formulate it as a theoretical problem. The article argues that it is insufficient to examine the “illegality” of undocumented migration only in terms of its consequences and that it is necessary also to produce historically informed accounts of the sociopolitical processes of “illegalization” themselves, which can be characterized as the legal production ...

2,177 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the place of refugees in the national order of things and suggests that the displacement of refugees is constituted differently from other kinds of deterritorialization by those states, organizations, and scholars who are concerned with refugees.
Abstract: In this new theoretical crossroads, examining the place of refugees in the national order of things becomes a clarifying exercise. On the one hand, trying to understand the circumstances of particular groups of refugees illuminates the complexity of the ways in which people construct, remember, and lay claim to particular places as “homelands” or “nations.” On the other, examining how refugees become an object of knowledge and management suggests that the displacement of refugees is constituted differently from other kinds of deterritorialization by those states, organizations, and scholars who are concerned with refugees. Here, the contemporary category of refugees is a particularly informative one in the study of the sociopolitical construction of space and place.

1,913 citations

MonographDOI
TL;DR: The argument of ethnic cleansing in former times is discussed in this article, where two versions of 'we, the people' are presented. But the argument is not applicable to the current world.
Abstract: 1. The argument 2. Ethnic cleansing in former times 3. Two versions of 'we, the people' 4. Genocidal democracies in the New World 5. Armenia, I: into the danger zone 6. Armenia, II: genocide 7. Nazis, I: radicalization 8. Nazis, II: fifteen hundred perpetrators 9. Nazis, III: genocidal careers 10. Germany's allies and auxiliaries 11. Communist cleansing: Stalin, Mao, Pol Pot 12. Yugoslavia, I: into the danger zone 13. Yugoslavia, II: murderous cleansing 14. Rwanda, I: into the danger zone 15. Rwanda, II: genocide 16. Counterfactual cases: India and Indonesia 17. Combating ethnic cleansing in the world today.

930 citations

MonographDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that documents such as passports, internal passports and related mechanisms have been crucial in making distinctions between citizens and non-citizens and examine how the concept of citizenship has been used to delineate rights and penalties regarding property, liberty, taxes and welfare.
Abstract: In order to distinguish between those who may and may not enter or leave, states everywhere have developed extensive systems of identification, central to which is the passport. This innovative book argues that documents such as passports, internal passports and related mechanisms have been crucial in making distinctions between citizens and non-citizens. It examines how the concept of citizenship has been used to delineate rights and penalties regarding property, liberty, taxes and welfare. It focuses on the US and Western Europe, moving from revolutionary France to the Napoleonic era, the American Civil War, the British industrial revolution, pre-World War I Italy, the reign of Germany's Third Reich and beyond. This innovative study combines theory and empirical data in questioning how and why states have established the exclusive right to authorize and regulate the movement of people.

911 citations