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Michael Tarrant

Bio: Michael Tarrant is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Risk management & Adaptive capacity. The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 9 publications receiving 247 citations.

Papers
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01 Apr 2010
TL;DR: Gibson and Tarrant as discussed by the authors discuss the range of interdependant factors needed to manage organisational resilience and demonstrate that effective resilience is built upon a range of different strategies that enhance both hard and soft organisational capabilities.
Abstract: Gibson and Tarrant discuss the range of inter-dependant factors needed to manage organisational resilience Over the last few years there has been considerable interest in the idea of resilience across all areas of society Like any new area or field this has produced a vast array of definitions, processes, management systems and measurement tools which together have clouded the concept of resilience Many of us have forgotten that ultimately resilience is not just about ‘bouncing back from adversity’ but is more broadly concerned with adaptive capacity and how we better understand and address uncertainty in our internal and external environments The basis of organisational resilience is a fundamental understanding and treatment of risk, particularly non-routine or disruption related risk This paper presents a number of conceptual models of organisational resilience that we have developed to demonstrate the range of inter-dependant factors that need to be considered in the management of such risk These conceptual models illustrate that effective resilience is built upon a range of different strategies that enhance both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ organisational capabilities They emphasise the concept that there is no quick fix, no single process, management system or software application that will create resilience

99 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: A number of conceptual models of organisational resilience are presented to demonstrate the range of inter-dependant factors that need to be considered in the management of such risk and emphasise the concept that there is no quick fix, no single process, management system or software application that will create resilience.
Abstract: Over the last few years there has been considerable interest in the idea of resilience across all areas of society. Like any new area or field this has produced a vast array of definitions, processes, management systems and measurement tools which together have clouded the concept of resilience. Many of us have forgotten that ultimately resilience is not just about 'bouncing back from adversity' but is more broadly concerned with adaptive capacity and how we better understand and address uncertainty in our internal and external environments. The basis of organisational resilience is a fundamental understanding and treatment of risk, particularly non-routine or disruptionrelated risk. This paper presents a number of conceptual models of organisational resilience that we have developed to demonstrate the range of inter-dependant factors that need to be considered in the management of such risk. These conceptual models illustrate that effective resilience is built upon a range of different strategies that enhance both 'hard' and 'soft' organisational capabilities . They emphasise the concept that there is no quick fix, no single process, management system or software application that will create resilience.

94 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This educational framework will provide an infrastructure around which future educational programs in Disaster Health in Australia may be designed and delivered and will permit improved articulation for students between the various levels and greater consistency between programs so that operational responders may have a consistent language and operational approach to the management of major events.
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Recent events have heightened awareness of disaster health issues and the need to prepare the health workforce to plan for and respond to major incidents This has been reinforced at an international level by the World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine, which has proposed an international educational framework ----------- OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to outline the development of a national educational framework for disaster health in Australia ----------- METHODS: The framework was developed on the basis of the literature and the previous experience of members of a National Collaborative for Disaster Health Education and Research The Collaborative was brought together in a series of workshops and teleconferences, utilizing a modified Delphi technique to finalize the content at each level of the framework and to assign a value to the inclusion of that content at the various levels ----------- FRAMEWORK: The framework identifies seven educational levels along with educational outcomes for each level The framework also identifies the recommended contents at each level and assigns a rating of depth for each component The framework is not intended as a detailed curriculum, but rather as a guide for educationalists to develop specific programs at each level ----------- CONCLUSIONS: This educational framework will provide an infrastructure around which future educational programs in Disaster Health in Australia may be designed and delivered It will permit improved articulation for students between the various levels and greater consistency between programs so that operational responders may have a consistent language and operational approach to the management of major events

34 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The challenges of the last 20 years, since 1986 that have contributed to developing current concepts and approaches to the emergency management function are outlined in this article, where a large amount of resources have been invested in studying risk in context of environment and there have been significant advances in thinking and practice in risk and emergency management.
Abstract: The challenges of the last 20 years, since 1986 that have contributed to developing current concepts and approaches to the emergency management function are outlined. Enormous resources have been invested in studying risk in context of environment and there have been significant advances in thinking and practice in risk and emergency management.

13 citations

01 Apr 2010
TL;DR: Tarrant argues that a solid risk management strategy is critical to building effective, transformational and adaptive organizations as discussed by the authors, and that effective risk management is a critical element in meeting organisational objectives in a turbulent and uncertain environment.
Abstract: Tarrant argues that a solid risk management strategy is critical to building effective, transformational and adaptive organisations Organisations are a fundamental part of our society and economic system whether they are private, public or not-for-profits There are very few aspects of our society and economy that don’t rely wholly or in part on the performance of organisations Disasters and crises are complex and very challenging environments for organisations How can effective transformational and adaptive capacity become institutionalised and a core part of good governance of organisations? Effective risk management is a critical element in meeting organisational objectives in a turbulent and uncertain environment

11 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of resilience literature in its widest context and later its application at an organisational level context is provided in this article, where the origins of the concept are reported and consequently, the various fields of research are analysed.
Abstract: In an ever-more interconnected world (social, technological and environmental), no organisation can retain a competitive position and survive disruptions as an independent entity. This article provides a review of resilience literature in its widest context and later its application at an organisational level context. The origins of the concept are reported and consequently, the various fields of research are analysed. The concept is shown to remain essentially constant regardless of its field of enquiry and has much to inform the fields of organisation theory, strategy and operations management. This article identifies a number of areas for advancing resilience research, in particular: the relationship between human and organisational resilience; understanding interfaces between organisational and infrastructural resilience.

943 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

300 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study proposes a theoretical model to understand how BT can influence operational supply chain transparency (OSTC) and ST among actors engaged in disaster relief operations and shows how BT-enabled ST can further improve collaboration (CO) among actors engage in disaster Relief operations and enhance supply chain resilience (SCR).
Abstract: There has been tremendous interest in blockchain technology (BT) (also known as distributed ledger technology) around the globe and across sectors. Following significant success in the financial sector, other sectors, such as humanitarian sector, have started deploying BT at various levels. Although the use of BT in the humanitarian sector is in its infancy, donors and government agencies are increasingly calling for building BT-enabled swift-trust and more collaborative relationships among various humanitarian actors in order to improve the transparency and traceability of disaster relief materials, information exchanges and flow of funds in disaster relief supply chains. Our study, which is informed by organizational information processing theory and relational view, proposes a theoretical model to understand how BT can influence operational supply chain transparency (OSTC) and swift-trust (ST) among actors engaged in disaster relief operations. Our model also shows how BT-enabled ST can further improve collaboration (CO) among actors engaged in disaster relief operations and enhance supply chain resilience. We formulated and tested six research hypotheses, using data gathered from international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) with the help of the Coordinator for Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) database. We received 256 usable responses using a pre-tested survey based instrument designed for key informants. Our results confirm that our six hypotheses were supported. Our study offers significant and valid contributions to the literature on swift-trust, collaboration and supply chain resilience and BT/distributed ledger technology. We have also noted limitations of our study and have offered future research directions.

276 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose that dynamic capabilities provide a mechanism that enables tourism organizations to respond to disruptive environmental changes through a process of routine transformation, resource allocation, and utilization, and the resulting theoretical framework takes a processual view to show how an organization's existing operational routines transform into new ones that are resilient to disruptive events.
Abstract: The importance of resilience for tourism organizations facing crises and disasters is indisputable. Yet little is known about how these organizations become resilient. This paper proposes that dynamic capabilities provide a mechanism that enables tourism organizations to respond to disruptive environmental changes through a process of routine transformation, resource allocation, and utilization. The resulting theoretical framework takes a processual view to show how an organization's existing operational routines transform into new ones that are resilient to disruptive events, enabled by dynamic capabilities and slack resources. The paper outlines six research propositions and suggests methods for future empirical research.

126 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a practical and holistic resilience framework for improving the resilience of Critical Infrastructures (CIs) taking into account the external agents is described. But, their implementation is still incipient and detailed prescriptions for their implementation are lacking, and some frameworks are only limited to describing the activities performed within the boundaries of the CI, neglecting the role of external agents.

106 citations