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Author

Michael Whitby

Bio: Michael Whitby is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Chronicon & Context (language use). The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 4 publications receiving 351 citations.

Papers
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MonographDOI
01 Jan 1989
TL;DR: The chronicle and its context, sources, interests, translation "Chronicon Paschale" - translation and notes as mentioned in this paper, the terminal date of CP the great chronographer Ericcson's postulated textual transposition the date of Heraclius' encounter with the Avars
Abstract: Introduction - the chronicle and its context, sources, interests, translation "Chronicon Paschale" - translation and notes. Appendices: the terminal date of CP the great chronographer Ericcson's postulated textual transposition the date of Heraclius' encounter with the Avars.

110 citations


Cited by
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Book
30 Nov 2009
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an evaluation of macroseismic data and a Catalogue of earthquakes and a long-term seismicity evaluation of instrumental data, as well as future challenges in the field of seismology.
Abstract: Preface 1. Macroseismic information 2. Evaluation of macroseismic data 3. Catalogue of earthquakes 4. Evaluation of instrumental data 5. Long-term seismicity 6. Future challenges Appendix: Photographs of researchers in the field References Index.

349 citations

DOI
01 Dec 1997
TL;DR: In the provinces the architectural and art forms characteristic of the Flavian era continued to flourish as mentioned in this paper and Dynamism returned to imperial commissions with the Romano-Spanish Trajan, who was able to impress upon it his own many-sided personality: ruler, philhellene, architect, dilettante, poet, traveller and romantic.
Abstract: Greek artefacts, craftsmen and artists had penetrated Rome since regal days; from the second century BC this trickle had become a continuing and influential flood, contributing together with Italic and Etruscan architecture and art, and the developing central Italian and Roman concrete architecture, to the rich tapestry of the art of the capital. Vespasian (69-79), founder of the Flavian dynasty, showed an astute pragmatism in his handling of architecture and art. In the provinces the architectural and art forms characteristic of the Flavian era continued to flourish. Dynamism returned to imperial commissions with the Romano-Spanish Trajan. The age of Hadrian (117-38) proved to be extraordinary, largely because of the extent to which he was able to impress upon it his own many-sided personality: ruler, philhellene, architect, dilettante, poet, traveller and romantic. The rich artistic harvest of the Flavian to the Antonine ages was not just an imperial, but a corporate achievement, one which offered a worthy inheritance to following generations.

172 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a list of abbreviations for the Church: 1. "What Has the Emperor to Do with the Church?" Persecution and Martyrdom from Diocletian to Constantine 2. "The God of the Martyrs Refuses You": Religious Violence, Political Discourse, and Christian Identity in the Century after Constantine 3. An Eye for an Eye: Religious Violence in Donatist Africa 4. Temperata Severitas: Augustine, the State, and Disciplinary Violence 5. "There Is No Crime for Those Who Have Christ": Holy
Abstract: Preface and Acknowledgments List of Abbreviations Introduction 1. "What Has the Emperor to Do with the Church?" Persecution and Martyrdom from Diocletian to Constantine 2. "The God of the Martyrs Refuses You": Religious Violence, Political Discourse, and Christian Identity in the Century after Constantine 3. An Eye for an Eye: Religious Violence in Donatist Africa 4. Temperata Severitas: Augustine, the State, and Disciplinary Violence 5. "There Is No Crime for Those Who Have Christ": Holy Men and Holy Violence in the Late Fourth and Early Fifth Centuries 6. "The Monks Commit Many Crimes": Holy Violence Contested 7. "Sanctify Thy Hand by the Blow": Problematizing Episcopal Power 8. Non Iudicium sed Latrocinium: Of Holy Synods and Robber Councils Conclusion Bibliography Index

157 citations

Book
13 Sep 2007
TL;DR: Rome and Iran to the beginning of the third century AD as mentioned in this paper, a chronological survey of the Sasanian Empire and its relations with the Roman Empire, is presented in this book.
Abstract: Part I. Narrative: 1. Rome and Iran to the beginning of the third century AD 2. Rome and the Sasanian Empire - a chronological survey Part II. Sources and Contexts: 3. Political goals 4. Warfare 5. Military confrontations 6. The diplomatic solutions 7. Arabia between the great powers 8. Shared interests - continuing conflicts 9. Religion - Christianity and Zoroastrianism 10. Emperor and King of Kings 11. Exchange of information between West and East Part III. Appendices.

132 citations

MonographDOI
TL;DR: Statius' Silvae, written late in the reign of Domitian (AD 81-96), are a new kind of poetry that confronts the challenge of imperial majesty or private wealth by new poetic strategies and forms as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Statius' Silvae, written late in the reign of Domitian (AD 81–96), are a new kind of poetry that confronts the challenge of imperial majesty or private wealth by new poetic strategies and forms. As poems of praise, they delight in poetic excess whether they honour the emperor or the poet's friends. Yet extravagant speech is also capacious speech. It functions as a strategy for conveying the wealth and grandeur of villas, statues and precious works of art as well as the complex emotions aroused by the material and political culture of empire. The Silvae are the product of a divided, self-fashioning voice. Statius was born in Naples of non-aristocratic parents. His position as outsider to the culture he celebrates gives him a unique perspective on it. The Silvae are poems of anxiety as well as praise, expressive of the tensions within the later period of Domitian's reign.

127 citations