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Mick Short

Bio: Mick Short is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Pragmatics & Applied linguistics. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 6 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 1990
TL;DR: The authors define discourse analysis as "the study of how people understand language in context" and stylistic analysis as the study of style and meaning of meaning in spoken and written texts, which can include matters like textual coherence and cohesion, and inferencing of meaning by readers or listeners.
Abstract: The terms discourse analysis and stylistic analysis mean different thing to different people. Most narrowly defined, discourse analysis has only to do with the structure of spoken discourse. Such a definition separates discourse analysis from literany stylistics and pragmatics—the study of how people understand language in context. At the other end of the spectrum, discourse analysis can be carried out on spoken and written texts, and can include matters like textual coherence and cohesion, and the inferencing of meaning by readers or listeners. In this case, it includes pragmatics and much of stylistics within its bounds. Similarly, stylistics can apply just to literary texts or not, and be restricted to the study of style or, on the other hand, include the study of meaning. For the purposes of this review, relatively wide definitions of both areas have been assumed in order to make what follows reasonably comprehensive. The main restriction assumed is that the works discussed will be relevant to the examination of literature in some way. The section on literature instruction will include matters relevant to both native and non-native learners of English, and will also make reference to the integration of literary and language study.

6 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: A pragmatic methodology derived from the integration of the theories and analytical systems of information flow in the tradition of the functionalist approach to speech and writing with the relevant theoretical and empirical findings from TS and other related branches of linguistics is provided.
Abstract: This thesis proposes a new approach to film dialogue translation (PDT) with special reference to the translation process and product quality of English-toChinese dubbing. In response to the persistent translation failures that led to widespread criticism of dubbed films and TV plays in China for their artificial 'translation talk', this study provides a pragmatic methodology derived from the integration of the theories and analytical systems of information flow in the tradition of the functionalist approach to speech and writing with the relevant theoretical and empirical findings from TS and other related branches of linguistics. It has developed and validated a translation model (FITNIA TS) which makes the intonation unit (IU) the central unit of film dialogue

19 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The authors used Content-Based Instruction (CBI) to get ESL students to achieve fluency in English by giving them the opportunity to use their previous knowledge to talk about academic topics.
Abstract: Most EFL teachers know how difficult it is to get students to achieve fluency in English. This is mainly due to large classes, limited time, students sharing the same mother tongue, and inappropriate use of materials and/or methodology. In the last few years, EFL and ESL teachers have been exposed to the benefits of using Content-Based Instruction for a variety of reasons (Brinton, Snow, and Wesche 1989); one being to give students the opportunity to use their previous knowledge to talk about academic topics.

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated the linguistic behaviour of the character Abu Jawdat, the chief police officer, with minor characters such as Abu Satoor and Subhi, and the major character of Muataz, in the fifth season of the Syrian TV series, Bab Al-Hara.
Abstract: This study investigates the linguistic behaviour of the character Abu Jawdat, the chief police officer, with minor characters such as Abu Satoor and Subhi, and the major character of Muataz, in the fifth season of the Syrian TV series, Bab Al-Hara. In particular, it studies the linguistic behaviour of the above mentioned characters in light of (im)politeness theories, specifically Brown and Levinson’s (1987) model of politeness and Culpeper’s (1996) framework of impoliteness as well as Grice’s (1975) cooperative principles and its maxims. The data of the study was transcribed in situations of police interrogations conducted by Abu Jawdat with Abu Satoor, Subhi and Muataz. The analysis of the selected chunks of conversation revealed that the change in the interactive linguistic behaviour of the characters can be explained by means of (im)politeness theories. Normally characters that possess power will get hold of the conversational floor and will have more chances to attack face.

6 citations