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Milan Chytrý

Bio: Milan Chytrý is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Vegetation (pathology). The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 900 citations.

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01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: The logo of the South African National Biodiversity Institute is based on the striking inflorescence of Strelitzia reginae, a native of the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal that has become a garden favourite worldwide as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The plant genus Strelitzia occurs naturally in the eastern parts of southern Africa. It comprises three arborescent species, known as wild bananas, and two acaulescent species, known as crane flowers or bird-of-paradise flowers. The logo of the South African National Biodiversity Institute is based on the striking inflorescence of Strelitzia reginae, a native of the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal that has become a garden favourite worldwide. It symbolises the commitment of the Institute to promote the sustainable use, conservation, appreciation and enjoyment of the exceptionally rich biodiversity of South Africa, for the benefit of all people.

2,730 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors used grid cell resolution databases for birds, mammals, amphibians and snakes (4142 vertebrate species) and c.13% of the plants (5881 species) from the Afrotropical Region.
Abstract: Aim To test whether it is possible to establish a common biogeographical regionalization for plants and vertebrates in sub-Saharan Africa (the Afrotropical Region), using objective multivariate methods. Location Sub-Saharan Africa (Afrotropical Region). Methods We used 1° grid cell resolution databases for birds, mammals, amphibians and snakes (4142 vertebrate species) and c. 13% of the plants (5881 species) from the Afrotropical Region. These databases were analysed using cluster analysis techniques to define biogeographical regions. A β(sim) dissimilarity matrix was subjected to a hierarchical classification using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA). The five group-specific biogeographical regionalizations were compared against a regionalization developed from a combined database, and a regionalization that is maximally congruent with the five group-specific datasets was determined using a consensus classification. The regionalizations were interpreted against measures of spatial turnover in richness and composition for the five datasets as well as the combined dataset. Results We demonstrate the existence of seven well-defined and consistent biogeographical regions in sub-Saharan Africa. These regionalizations are statistically defined and robust between groups, with minor taxon-specific biogeographical variation. The proposed biogeographical regions are: Congolian, Zambezian, Southern African, Sudanian, Somalian, Ethiopian and Saharan. East Africa, the West African coast, and the transitions between the Congolian, Sudanian and Zambezian regions are unassigned. The Cape area in South Africa, Afromontane areas and the coastal region of East Africa do not emerge as distinct regions but are characterized by high neighbourhood heterogeneity, rapid turnover of species and high levels of narrow endemism. Main conclusions Species distribution data and modern cluster analysis techniques can be used to define biogeographical regions in Africa that reflect the patterns found in both vertebrates and plants. The consensus of the regionalizations between different taxonomic groups is high. These regions are broadly similar to those proposed using expert opinion approaches. Some previously proposed transitional zones are not recognized in this classification.

299 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: South Africa’s national-scale strategy to clear invasive alien plants should be substantially modified if impacts are to be effectively mitigated, and a more focused approach is called for.

283 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated the utility of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) hyperspectral data, and WorldView-2 and Quickbird multispectral spectral data and a combined spectral+tree height dataset (derived from the CAO LiDAR system) for mapping seven common savanna tree species or genera in the Sabi Sands Reserve and communal lands adjacent to Kruger National Park, South Africa.

209 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study confirms the predicted generality of hydrological niche segregation, but also emphasizes its importance for structuring plant communities, which will have implications for conservation in habitats that face changing hydrology caused by water abstraction and climate change.
Abstract: • Ecologists still puzzle over how plant species manage to coexist with one another while competing for the same essential resources. The classic answer for animal communities is that species occupy different niches, but how plants do this is more difficult to determine. We previously found niche segregation along fine-scale hydrological gradients in European wet meadows and proposed that the mechanism might be a general one, especially in communities that experience seasonal saturation. • We quantified the hydrological niches of 96 species from eight fynbos communities in the biodiversity hotspot of the Cape Floristic Region, South Africa and 99 species from 18 lowland wet meadow communities in the UK. Niche overlap was computed for all combinations of species. • Despite the extreme functional and phylogenetic differences between the fynbos and wet meadow communities, an identical trade-off (i.e. specialization of species towards tolerance of aeration and/or drying stress) was found to cause segregation along fine-scale hydrological gradients. • This study not only confirms the predicted generality of hydrological niche segregation, but also emphasizes its importance for structuring plant communities. Eco-hydrological niche segregation will have implications for conservation in habitats that face changing hydrology caused by water abstraction and climate change.

203 citations