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Milos Mazanek

Bio: Milos Mazanek is an academic researcher from Czech Technical University in Prague. The author has contributed to research in topics: Antenna (radio) & Dipole antenna. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 78 publications receiving 478 citations.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper aims to present WPT technology in an integrated way, addressing state-of-the-art and challenges, and to discuss future R&D perspectives summarizing recent activities in Europe.
Abstract: Wireless power transmission (WPT) is an emerging technology that is gaining increased visibility in recent years. Efficient WPT circuits, systems and strategies can address a large group of applications spanning from batteryless systems, battery-free sensors, passive RF identification, near-field communications, and many others. WPT is a fundamental enabling technology of the Internet of Things concept, as well as machine-to-machine communications, since it minimizes the use of batteries and eliminates wired power connections. WPT technology brings together RF and dc circuit and system designers with different backgrounds on circuit design, novel materials and applications, and regulatory issues, forming a cross disciplinary team in order to achieve an efficient transmission of power over the air interface. This paper aims to present WPT technology in an integrated way, addressing state-of-the-art and challenges, and to discuss future R&D perspectives summarizing recent activities in Europe.

148 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a compact, battery-less system for an implantable semi-active UHF radio frequency identification (RFID) tag with inductive wireless power transfer for the human body was designed.
Abstract: The objective of this letter was to design a compact, battery-less system for an implantable semi-active UHF radio frequency identification (RFID) tag with inductive wireless power transfer for the human body. An RFID chip of the tag, combining powering from a reader by communication and from another source through inductive wireless power transfer, was used. Tag sensitivity for communication was increased by about 21 dB with the help of wireless inductive powering when compared to tags that did not employ this system. Communication and powering circuits were integrated within compact structures on the sides of the reader and the tag. The structure for communication and powering on the side of the reader consists of a center-excised Archimedes spiral antenna and a circular loop, respectively. Similarly, the structure on the side of the tag consists of a folded dipole antenna for communication and a rectangular loop for powering.

26 citations

01 Apr 2012
TL;DR: This paper brings a brief overview of the statistical method called Principal Component Analysis (PCA), used for clutter reduction in detection of hidden objects, targets hidden behind walls, buried landmines, etc.
Abstract: This paper brings a brief overview of the statistical method called Principal Component Analysis (PCA). It is used for clutter reduction in detection of hidden objects, targets hidden behind walls, buried landmines, etc. Since the measured data, imaged in time domain, suffer from the hyperbolic character of objects’ reflections, the utilization of the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) method is briefly described. Besides, the basics of PCA as well as its calculation from the Singular Value Decomposition are presented. The principles of ground and clutter subtraction from image are then demonstrated using training data set and SAR processed measured data.

25 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Sep 2007
TL;DR: The main part of the paper presents the impulse distortion minimization by the feeding transition and the overall obtained results, which are compared with measured characteristics.
Abstract: The paper deals with the optimization of the Vivaldi antenna, which is suitable for the measurement of impulse radiation characteristics. In case of particular ultra wideband applications (i.e. radar, positioning, etc.), it is crucial to know the transient responses of antennas. The optimization process searches for the Vivaldi antenna shape. The optimization accomplishes three required parameters - good matching, minimal distortion and smaller antenna dimensions. The parametric study and the manual step-by-step method were used in the process of antenna optimization. The main part of the paper presents the impulse distortion minimization by the feeding transition and the overall obtained results, which are compared with measured characteristics.

22 citations

01 Sep 2006
TL;DR: In this article, a self complementary spiral antenna and a wideband impedance transformer were designed for a parabolic reflector in the frequency range 12 to 40 GHz for wideband illumination.
Abstract: This paper describes a design of the Self- Complementary Spiral Antenna (SCSA) which consists of a spiral antenna and wideband impedance transformer The spiral antenna and the transformer are designed sepa- rately due to computing demands New knowledge about current distribution on the spiral antenna and influence of higher numbers of wavelength in circumference is pre- sented The novel transition between feeding and radiating antenna structure are optimized in the frequency range 12 to 40 GHz The meaning of the transition in the paper includes the impedance as well as the geometry transform- ing of the structure The antenna is suitable for wideband illuminating of a parabolic reflector due to relatively con- stant phase center and radiation pattern with frequency

21 citations


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01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: This rfid handbook fundamentals and applications in contactless smart cards and identification helps people to read a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon instead of juggled with some malicious bugs inside their laptop.
Abstract: Thank you for reading rfid handbook fundamentals and applications in contactless smart cards and identification. As you may know, people have search numerous times for their chosen novels like this rfid handbook fundamentals and applications in contactless smart cards and identification, but end up in malicious downloads. Rather than reading a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon, instead they juggled with some malicious bugs inside their laptop.

570 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper highlights three different energy harvester models, namely, one linear model and two nonlinear models, and shows how WIPT designs differ for each of them in single-user and multi-user deployments, and identifies the fundamental tradeoff between conveying information and power wirelessly.
Abstract: Radio waves carry both energy and information simultaneously. Nevertheless, radio-frequency (RF) transmissions of these quantities have traditionally been treated separately. Currently, the community is experiencing a paradigm shift in wireless network design, namely, unifying wireless transmission of information and power so as to make the best use of the RF spectrum and radiation as well as the network infrastructure for the dual purpose of communicating and energizing. In this paper, we review and discuss recent progress in laying the foundations of the envisioned dual purpose networks by establishing a signal theory and design for wireless information and power transmission (WIPT) and identifying the fundamental tradeoff between conveying information and power wirelessly. We start with an overview of WIPT challenges and technologies, namely, simultaneous WIPT (SWIPT), wirelessly powered communication networks (WPCNs), and wirelessly powered backscatter communication (WPBC). We then characterize energy harvesters and show how WIPT signal and system designs crucially revolve around the underlying energy harvester model. To that end, we highlight three different energy harvester models, namely, one linear model and two nonlinear models, and show how WIPT designs differ for each of them in single-user and multi-user deployments. Topics discussed include rate-energy region characterization, transmitter and receiver architectures, waveform design, modulation, beamforming and input distribution optimizations, resource allocation, and RF spectrum use. We discuss and check the validity of the different energy harvester models and the resulting signal theory and design based on circuit simulations, prototyping, and experimentation. We also point out numerous directions that are promising for future research.

556 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors proposed a wideband ultra wideband (UWB) communication protocol with a low EIRP level (−41.3dBm/MHz) for unlicensed operation between 3.1 and 10.6 GHz.
Abstract: Before the emergence of ultra-wideband (UWB) radios, widely used wireless communications were based on sinusoidal carriers, and impulse technologies were employed only in specific applications (e.g. radar). In 2002, the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) allowed unlicensed operation between 3.1–10.6 GHz for UWB communication, using a wideband signal format with a low EIRP level (−41.3dBm/MHz). UWB communication systems then emerged as an alternative to narrowband systems and significant effort in this area has been invested at the regulatory, commercial, and research levels.

452 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors give an overview on the various radiative wireless power transfer (WPT) technologies, the historical development of the radiative WPT technology and the main challenges in designing contemporary WPT systems, focusing on the state-of-the-art communication and signal processing techniques that can be applied to tackle these challenges.
Abstract: Radiative wireless power transfer (WPT) is a promising technology to provide cost-effective and real-time power supplies to wireless devices. Although radiative WPT shares many similar characteristics with the extensively studied wireless information transfer or communication, they also differ significantly in terms of design objectives, transmitter/receiver architectures and hardware constraints, and so on. In this paper, we first give an overview on the various WPT technologies, the historical development of the radiative WPT technology and the main challenges in designing contemporary radiative WPT systems. Then, we focus on the state-of-the-art communication and signal processing techniques that can be applied to tackle these challenges. Topics discussed include energy harvester modeling, energy beamforming for WPT, channel acquisition, power region characterization in multi-user WPT, waveform design with linear and non-linear energy receiver model, safety and health issues of WPT, massive multiple-input multiple-output and millimeter wave enabled WPT, wireless charging control, and wireless power and communication systems co-design. We also point out directions that are promising for future research.

408 citations