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Author

Min Chen

Bio: Min Chen is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Construction management & Relevant cost. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 3 publications receiving 10 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the incremental costs and benefits in the life cycle of green building are identified and described by math equations, and the evaluation indexes of incremental cost-benefit analysis, considering the social benefits and environmental benefits, are given to evaluate the economy of green project.
Abstract: The promotion of green building has significant contribution to the implementation of sustainable development principles. And with the enhancing awareness of environment protection, green building becomes the trend of the construction industry. While its promotion is still very difficult, the major barrier affecting the application of green strategies is the high initial cost. So the incremental costs and benefits in the life cycle of green building are identified and described by math equations in this paper. Furthermore, the evaluation indexes of incremental cost-benefit analysis, considering the social benefits and environmental benefits, are given to evaluate the economy of green project, which is of certain practical significance.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a review of existing research works and practices for managing construction wastes has been presented, and several directions for further study, such as behavior and incentive scheme, assessment and evaluation system, multi-objective optimization the application of information technology and so on.
Abstract: Nowadays, the increasing awareness of environmental impacts from construction wastes has led to the development of waste management as an important function of construction project management. Various theories and approaches for managing construction wastes have been developed in the existing research works and practices. The objective of this descriptive study is to analyze the current status of construction management and indicate the directions for future study. Based on a review of literature,this paper gives a framework of construction waste management from the view of fields, methods and measures in existing researches, and then it indicates several directions for further study, such as behavior and incentive scheme, assessment and evaluation system, multi-objective optimization the application of information technology and so on.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Analytic Hierarchy Process model is made to analyze the rate of each factor affecting the individual cost through expert system and this method is of practical significance and proved effective through a living example.
Abstract: Tender offer is very important to the construction enterprises in the bidding process. So how to identify the individual cost objectively and efficiently is studied in the essay. The relations of social average cost and individual cost, the factors affecting the individual cost and the difficulty in ascertaining the cost in the bidding process are analyzed. Grey RBF neural network model is built combining with the cost index to obtain the social average cost. The Analytic Hierarchy Process model is made to analyze the rate of each factor affecting the individual cost through expert system. On the basis of the social average cost combining with the affecting rate of each factor, the individual cost could be judged. This method is of practical significance and proved effective through a living example. The conclusion could provide reference for construction enterprise to select the bidding strategy.

Cited by
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01 Jan 1983
TL;DR: The Journal of Construction Engineering and Management as mentioned in this paper is a journal that aims to advance the science of construction engineering, harmonize construction practices with design theories, and further education and research in construction engineering and management.
Abstract: The Journal of Construction Engineering and Management publishes quality papers that aim to advance the science of construction engineering, harmonize construction practices with design theories, and further education and research in construction engineering and management. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following: construction material handling, equipment, production planning, specifications, scheduling, estimating, cost control, quality control, labor productivity, inspection, contract administration, construction management, computer applications, and environmental concerns.

86 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: In this article, a sample population from the major UK architectural and contracting firms through 24 interviews was investigated to investigate the underlying origins, causes and sources of waste across all project life cycle stages.
Abstract: An ever-increasing amount of global research on construction waste has been conducted over the past two decades, ranging from ‘soft’ mapping and management, reduction tools and methodologies to ‘hard’ material and recycling technologies. However, the current state of research is largely dominated by endeavours to manage waste that has already been produced. Hence, there is a need for a shift from ‘end-of pipe’ solutions that focus on on-site waste management to a source-based approach that is aimed at ‘life cycle’ analysis. This research engaged a sample population from the major UK architectural and contracting firms through 24 interviews to investigate the underlying origins, causes and sources of waste across all project life cycle stages. Respondents reported that designing out waste has never been the most glamorous end of sustainable design. Moreover, the results reveal that waste generation is affected by a wide practice of not embedding waste reduction in briefing and contractual documents, no bas...

35 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, a Designing out Waste (DoW) Framework is proposed to assist architects in embedding design waste reduction strategies in each design stage, which is based on the concept of design reuse.
Abstract: The construction industry is by far the greatest consumer of resources and waste producer of all industries in the UK; being responsible for 32% of total waste generation, which equates to three times the combined waste produced by all households. Consequently, construction waste management and minimisation became a priority in the EU and UK environmental policy programmes resulting in a combined plethora of government-driven waste related legislation and guidance documents to curb construction waste production. Similarly, an ever-increasing global research on construction waste has been conducted over the last decade ranging from ‘soft’ onsite waste auditing tools and methodologies to ‘hard’ material and recycling technologies. However, the current state-of-research is largely dominated by endeavours to manage waste that has already been produced. Very few studies have been undertaken on how architects could go about minimising waste through a change in design practices. Hence, this research set out to construct and validate a Designing out Waste (DoW) Framework to assist architects in embedding design waste reduction strategies in each design stage. [Continues.]

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors conducted a systematic and comprehensive review of current journal articles and industrial reports, revealing that green building aspects are linked to six dimensions (three subjective and three objective) of occupant well-being.
Abstract: A series of international conferences and initiatives, such as the Habitat III New Urban Agenda and UN Sustainable Development Goals, have urged industry, scholars, and policymakers to create an inclusive and sustainable built environment for all in the coming era of cities. Green building schemes, which have been gaining momentum over recent decades, are one of the most influential measures that have been taken to promote urban sustainability. However, due to disciplinary characteristics, most current studies share a techno-engineering focus. Seldom do they answer the question: will green buildings make a difference to the occupants? This paper explains how, and to what extent, green features and design contribute to different dimensions of occupant well-being by conducting a systematic and comprehensive review of current journal articles and industrial reports. It provides an alternative, occupant-oriented perspective to the conventional discourse. A conceptual framework is developed, revealing that green building aspects are linked to six dimensions (three subjective and three objective) of occupant well-being. It further shows how different green features are linked with these dimensions through a detailed examination of the literature. Finally, suggestions are provided based on the research findings for the direction of future green building development and empirical research.

5 citations