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Minguang Yang

Bio: Minguang Yang is an academic researcher from Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The author has contributed to research in topics: Medicine & Neuroscience. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 11 publications receiving 18 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Investigation of the role of exosomal miRNAs in non-drug therapy of electro-acupuncture regulating endogenous neural stem cells for stroke recovery found EA promoted NeuroD1-mediated Neural stem cells differentiation via miR-146b to improve neurological injury after ischemic stroke.
Abstract: Background: Evidences indicate that exosomes-mediated delivery of microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) is involved in the neurogenesis of stroke. This study was to investigate the role of exosomal miRNAs in non-drug therapy of electro-acupuncture (EA) regulating endogenous neural stem cells for stroke recovery. Methods: The model of focal cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats were established by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and treated by EA. The exosomes were extracted from peri-ischemic striatum and identified by exosomal biomarkers, and detected differentially expressed miRNAs with microarray chip. Primary stem cells were cultured, and oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R) was used to mimic vitro ischemic injury. Results: The levels of exosomal biomarkers TSG101 and CD81 were increased in peri-ischemic striatum after EA treatment, and we revealed 25 differentially expressed miRNAs in isolated exosomes, of which miR-146b was selected for further analysis, and demonstrated that EA increased miR-146b expression and its inhibitors could block the effects. Subsequently, we confirmed that EA upregulated miR-146b expression to promote neural stem cells differentiation into neurons in peri-ischemic striatum. In vitro, it was verified that OGD/R hindered neural stem cells differentiation, and miR-146b inhibitors furtherly suppressed its differentiation, simultaneously NeuroD1 was involved in neural stem cells differentiation into neurons. Moreover, in vivo we found EA promoted NeuroD1-mediated neural stem cells differentiation via miR-146b. In addition, EA also could improve neurological deficits through miR-146b after ischemic stroke. Conclusion: EA promotes the differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells via exosomal miR-146b to improve neurological injury after ischemic stroke.

29 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Electroacupuncture treatment at LI11 and ST36 could enhance the functional connectivity between the left motor cortex and the motor function-related brain regions, including the motor cortex, sensory cortex and striatum, in rats.
Abstract: BackgroundTo evaluate whether electroacupuncture (EA) treatment at LI11 and ST36 could reduce motor impairments and enhance brain functional recovery in a rat model of ischemic strokeMethodsA rat

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors investigated the mechanisms underlying the activation of the cholinergic circuit and its impact on learning and memory using APP/PS1 mice models and found that the levels of choline (Cho) in the basal forebrain were markedly higher compared to other brain regions and that its decrease along with N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) levels in the hippocampus was accompanied by memory impairments in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Abstract: Abstract Background The degeneration of the cholinergic circuit from the basal forebrain to the hippocampus contributes to memory loss in patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the internal relationships between the acetylcholine (Ach) cycle and memory decline during the early stages of AD currently remain unknown. Here, we investigate the mechanisms underlying the activation of the cholinergic circuit and its impact on learning and memory using APP/PS1 mice models. Methods Novel object recognition and Morris water maze tests were used to measure learning and memory function. Magnetic resonance spectrum (MRS) imaging was applied to longitudinally track changes in neurochemical metabolism in APP/PS1 mice aged 2, 4, 6, and 8 months. The number of neurons and the deposition of Aβ plaques were measured using Nissl, immunohistochemistry, and Thioflavin S staining. We then employed a chemogenetic strategy to selectively activate the cholinergic circuit from the medial septal nucleus (MS) and the vertical limb of the diagonal band nucleus (VDB) on the basal forebrain to the hippocampus. MRS and immunoblotting techniques were used to measure the neurochemical metabolism levels and cholinergic-related proteins, respectively. Results We found that the levels of choline (Cho) in the basal forebrain were markedly higher compared to other brain regions and that its decrease along with N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) levels in the hippocampus was accompanied by memory deficits in APP/PS1 mice aged 4, 6, and 8 months. In terms of pathology, we observed that the deposition of Aβ plaques gradually aggravated throughout the cerebral cortex and hippocampus in APP/PS1 mice aged 6 and 8 months, while no Aβ deposition was detected in the basal forebrain. In contrast, the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) enzyme in the basal forebrain was decreased at 6 months of age and the cholinergic neurons were lost in the basal forebrain at 8 months of age. In addition, the activation of the cholinergic circuit from the MS and VDB to the hippocampus using chemical genetics is able to improve learning and reduce memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice. Similarly, the levels of Cho in the basal forebrain; NAA in the hippocampus, as well as the expression of ChAT and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (vAchT) in the basal forebrain; and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 2 (CHRM2) in the hippocampus all increased. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that the neurochemical Cho and NAA of the cholinergic circuit can be used as biomarkers to enable the early diagnosis of AD. In addition, memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice can be attenuated using chemical genetics-driven Ach cycle activity of the cholinergic circuit.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Electroacupuncture at GV 20 and GV 24 acupoints improved cognitive deficits in cerebral ischemic rats via the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway and mediated synaptic plasticity in the peri-infarct hippocampal CA1 region of rats following isChemic stroke.
Abstract: Objective: To determine the mechanism(s) involved in electroacupuncture (EA)-mediated improvements in synaptic plasticity in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/R)-induced cognitive deficits. Methods: Focal cerebral ischemic stroke was induced by (MCAO/R) surgery. Rats were randomly split into 4 groups: control group (sham operation control), MCAO group, Baihui (GV 20) and Shenting (GV 24) acupoint EA group (verum acupuncture, MCAO + VA), and nonacupoint EA group (control acupuncture, MCAO + CA). EA treatment was administered for 14 consecutive days in MCAO + VA and MCAO + CA groups. Neurological assessment, behavioral performance testing, and molecular biology assays were used to evaluate the MCAO/R model, EA therapeutic effect and potential therapeutic mechanism(s) of EA. Results: Significant amelioration of neurological deficits was found in MCAO + VA rats compared with MCAO rats (P

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors investigated the mechanisms underlying the activation of the cholinergic circuit and its impact on learning and memory using APP/PS1 mice models and found that the levels of choline (Cho) in the basal forebrain were markedly higher compared to other brain regions and that its decrease along with N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) levels in the hippocampus was accompanied by memory impairments in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Abstract: Abstract Background The degeneration of the cholinergic circuit from the basal forebrain to the hippocampus contributes to memory loss in patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the internal relationships between the acetylcholine (Ach) cycle and memory decline during the early stages of AD currently remain unknown. Here, we investigate the mechanisms underlying the activation of the cholinergic circuit and its impact on learning and memory using APP/PS1 mice models. Methods Novel object recognition and Morris water maze tests were used to measure learning and memory function. Magnetic resonance spectrum (MRS) imaging was applied to longitudinally track changes in neurochemical metabolism in APP/PS1 mice aged 2, 4, 6, and 8 months. The number of neurons and the deposition of Aβ plaques were measured using Nissl, immunohistochemistry, and Thioflavin S staining. We then employed a chemogenetic strategy to selectively activate the cholinergic circuit from the medial septal nucleus (MS) and the vertical limb of the diagonal band nucleus (VDB) on the basal forebrain to the hippocampus. MRS and immunoblotting techniques were used to measure the neurochemical metabolism levels and cholinergic-related proteins, respectively. Results We found that the levels of choline (Cho) in the basal forebrain were markedly higher compared to other brain regions and that its decrease along with N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) levels in the hippocampus was accompanied by memory deficits in APP/PS1 mice aged 4, 6, and 8 months. In terms of pathology, we observed that the deposition of Aβ plaques gradually aggravated throughout the cerebral cortex and hippocampus in APP/PS1 mice aged 6 and 8 months, while no Aβ deposition was detected in the basal forebrain. In contrast, the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) enzyme in the basal forebrain was decreased at 6 months of age and the cholinergic neurons were lost in the basal forebrain at 8 months of age. In addition, the activation of the cholinergic circuit from the MS and VDB to the hippocampus using chemical genetics is able to improve learning and reduce memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice. Similarly, the levels of Cho in the basal forebrain; NAA in the hippocampus, as well as the expression of ChAT and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (vAchT) in the basal forebrain; and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 2 (CHRM2) in the hippocampus all increased. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that the neurochemical Cho and NAA of the cholinergic circuit can be used as biomarkers to enable the early diagnosis of AD. In addition, memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice can be attenuated using chemical genetics-driven Ach cycle activity of the cholinergic circuit.

8 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors summarized the pathogenic role of non-coding RNAs and exosomal ncRNAs in the stroke and considered exosomes as nanocarriers capable of transferring various cargos, such as lncRNAs and miRNAs to recipient cells, with prominent intercellular roles in the mediation of neuro-restorative events following strokes and neural injuries.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a review on the evidence on the possible mechanisms underlying mechanisms of acupuncture therapy in treating stroke by regulating brain plasticity is presented, which may be linked to the mechanism effect of acupuncture.
Abstract: Acupuncture is widely recognized as a potentially effective treatment for stroke rehabilitation. Researchers in this area are actively investigating its therapeutic mechanisms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a noninvasive, high anatomical resolution technique, has been employed to investigate neuroplasticity on acupuncture in stroke patients from a system level. However, there is no review on the mechanism of acupuncture treatment for stroke based on MRI. Therefore, we aim to summarize the current evidence about this aspect and provide useful information for future research. After searching PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase databases, 24 human and five animal studies were identified. This review focuses on the evidence on the possible mechanisms underlying mechanisms of acupuncture therapy in treating stroke by regulating brain plasticity. We found that acupuncture reorganizes not only motor-related network, including primary motor cortex (M1), premotor cortex, supplementary motor area (SMA), frontoparietal network (LFPN and RFPN), and sensorimotor network (SMN), as well as default mode network (aDMN and pDMN), but also language-related brain areas including inferior frontal gyrus frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes, as well as cognition-related brain regions. In addition, acupuncture therapy can modulate the function and structural plasticity of post-stroke, which may be linked to the mechanism effect of acupuncture.

25 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the inhibitory effects of electroacupuncture on ferroptosis in MCAO rats and found that EA significantly improved coordinated motor deficit and decreased cerebral infarct volume.
Abstract: Background: Our previous study found that electroacupuncture (EA) can promote the recovery of neurological functions, reduce the volume of cerebral infarction, and protect the neurovascular unit in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats. Some studies have shown that ferroptosis is closely related to ischemic stroke; however, whether EA plays a protective role by regulating ferroptosis is unknown. Objective: We aimed to investigate the inhibitory effects of EA on ferroptosis in MCAO rats. Methods: We used 36 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in this study. MCAO rats were established according to the Zea method and treated with EA at a continuous wave of 2/100 Hz and ~2-4 V for 30 min for 7 consecutive days. We analyzed the coordinated motor deficit and volume of cerebral infarction in vivo through 9.4-tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Then, the ischemic brain tissue was isolated and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), and iron were determined. Western blotting and real-time quantitative PCR were performed to evaluate the expression of glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4), transferrin (Tf), transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), and ferritin heavy chain 1 (FTH1). To confirm the results, we used a transmission electron microscope to observe the mitochondrial morphology. Results: EA intervention significantly decreased the oxidative stress level and inhibited ferroptosis. EA significantly improved coordinated motor deficit (P < 0.01) and decreased cerebral infarct volume (P < 0.01) in the EA + MCAO group, compared with the MCAO group. EA downregulated the level of MDA (P < 0.01) and total iron (P < 0.01) and upregulated the level of SOD (P < 0.01) and GSH (P < 0.01) in the EA + MCAO group, compared with the MCAO group. EA increased the levels of GPX4 and GPX4 mRNA (P < 0.01) and FTH1 and FTH1 mRNA (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), whereas it decreased the levels of Tf and Tf mRNA (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) and TfR1 and TfR1 mRNA (P < 0.01) in the EA + MCAO group, compared with the MCAO group. EA also promoted the recovery of mitochondrial morphology according to the mitochondrial classification system for the ischemic cerebral tissue. Conclusion: Our results indicate that EA can inhibit ferroptosis by regulating oxidative stress and iron-related proteins, thus conferring protection against MCAO in a rat model.

24 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Electroacupuncture stimulation might provide a potential treatment strategy for treating apoplectic patients in clinic and the combination of EA and common rehabilitation treatment may exert better effect compared with EA alone.
Abstract: Electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation is a supplementary therapy and commonly applied in treatment of ischemic stroke in clinic. Stroke is an important cause of long-term disability in individuals in both developing and developed countries. In our review, we show the application of EA stimulation for apoplectic pain, limbs spasticity, blood flow interruption, depression, swallowing dysfunction, aphasia, urinary incontinence, cognition and memory impairment, and constipation following stroke in patients and the related mechanisms in animals. The effectiveness of EA involves with acupoints, intensity, intervals, and duration of intervention for treatment of stroke. The combination of EA and common rehabilitation treatment may exert better effect compared with EA alone. In summary, EA might provide a potential treatment strategy for treating apoplectic patients in clinic.

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is proposed that electroacupuncture at the Shenting and Baihui acupoints could regulate microglial polarization and decrease Aβ plaques to improve learning and memory in mild AD mice.
Abstract: Microglia are the primary cells that exert immune function in the central nervous system, and accumulating evidence suggests that microglia act as critical players in the initiation of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Microglia seemingly demonstrate two contradictory phenotypes in response to different microenvironmental cues, the M1 phenotype and the M2 phenotype, which are detrimental and beneficial to pathogenesis, respectively. Inhibiting the M1 phenotype with simultaneous promoting the M2 phenotype has been suggested as a potential therapeutic approach for cure AD. In this study, we demonstrated that electroacupuncture at the Shenting and Baihui acupoints for 16 weeks could improve learning and memory in the Morris water maze test and reduce amyloid β-protein in the parietal association cortex and entorhinal cortex in mice with mild and moderate AD. Besides, electroacupuncture at the Shenting and Baihui acupoints not only suppressed M1 marker (iNOS/IL-1β) expression but also increased the M2 marker (CD206/Arg1) expression in those regions. We propose that electroacupuncture at the Shenting and Baihui acupoints could regulate microglial polarization and decrease Aβ plaques to improve learning and memory in mild AD mice.

19 citations