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Author

Minho Shin

Bio: Minho Shin is an academic researcher from Myongji University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Wireless network & Handover. The author has an hindex of 23, co-authored 71 publications receiving 3750 citations. Previous affiliations of Minho Shin include Dartmouth College & Samsung.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 2003
TL;DR: This paper presents an empirical study of this handoff process at the link layer, with a detailed breakup of the latency into various components, showing that a MAC layer function - probe is the primary contributor to the overall handoff latency.
Abstract: IEEE 802.11 based wireless networks have seen rapid growth and deployment in the recent years. Critical to the 802.11 MAC operation, is the handoff function which occurs when a mobile node moves its association from one access point to another. In this paper, we present an empirical study of this handoff process at the link layer, with a detailed breakup of the latency into various components. In particular, we show that a MAC layer function - probe is the primary contributor to the overall handoff latency. In our study, we observe that the latency is significant enough to affect the quality of service for many applications (or network connections). Further we find variations in the latency from one hand-off to another as well as with APs and STAs used from different vendors. Finally, we discuss optimizations on the probe phase which can potentially reduce the probe latency by as much as 98% (and a minimum of 12% in our experiments). Based on the study, we draw some guidelines for future handoff schemes.

954 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
17 Jun 2008
TL;DR: AnonySense allows applications to submit sensing tasks that will be distributed across anonymous participating mobile devices, later receiving verified, yet anonymized, sensor data reports back from the field, thus providing the first secure implementation of this participatory sensing model.
Abstract: Personal mobile devices are increasingly equipped with the capability to sense the physical world (through cameras, microphones, and accelerometers, for example) and the, network world (with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth interfaces). Such devices offer many new opportunities for cooperative sensing applications. For example, users' mobile phones may contribute data to community-oriented information services, from city-wide pollution monitoring to enterprise-wide detection of unauthorized Wi-Fi access points. This people-centric mobile-sensing model introduces a new security challenge in the design of mobile systems: protecting the privacy of participants while allowing their devices to reliably contribute high-quality data to these large-scale applications.We describe AnonySense, a privacy-aware architecture for realizing pervasive applications based on collaborative, opportunistic sensing by personal mobile devices. AnonySense allows applications to submit sensing tasks that will be distributed across anonymous participating mobile devices, later receiving verified, yet anonymized, sensor data reports back from the field, thus providing the first secure implementation of this participatory sensing model. We describe our trust model, and the security properties that drove the design of the AnonySense system. We evaluate our prototype implementation through experiments that indicate the feasibility of this approach, and through two applications: a Wi-Fi rogue access point detector and a lost-object finder.

432 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
06 Jun 2004
TL;DR: The use of a novel and efficient discovery method using neighbor graphs and non-overlap graphs that reduces the total number of probed channels as well as the total time spent waiting on each channel and reduces the overall probe time significantly.
Abstract: The 802.11 IEEE Standard has enabled low cost and effective wireless LAN services (WLAN). With the sales and deployment of WLAN based networks exploding, many people believe that they will become the fourth generation cellular system (4G) or a major portion of it. However, the small cell size of WLAN creates frequent hand-offs for mobile users. If the latency of these hand-offs is high, as previous studies have shown, then the users of synchronous multimedia applications such as voice over IP (VoIP) will experience excessive jitter. The dominating factor in WLAN hand-offs has been shown to be the discovery of the candidate set of next access points. In this paper, we describe the use of a novel and efficient discovery method using neighbor graphs and non-overlap graphs. Our method reduces the total number of probed channels as well as the total time spent waiting on each channel. Our implementation results show that this approach reduces the overall probe time significantly when compared to other approaches. Furthermore, simulation results show that the effectiveness of our method improves as the number of non-overlapping channels increases, such as in the 5 GHz band used by the IEEE 802.11a standard.

330 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
07 Mar 2004
TL;DR: A novel and efficient data structure, neighbor graphs, is described, which dynamically captures the mobility topology of a wireless network as a means for prepositioning the station's context ensuring that the station’s context always remains one hop ahead.
Abstract: User mobility in wireless data networks is increasing because of technological advances, and the desire for voice and multimedia applications. These applications, however, require fast handoffs between base stations to maintain the quality of the connections. Previous work on context transfer for fast handoffs has focused on reactive methods, i.e. the context transfer occurs after the mobile station has associated with the next base station or access router. In this paper, we describe the use of a novel and efficient data structure, neighbor graphs, which dynamically captures the mobility topology of a wireless network as a means for prepositioning the station's context ensuring that the station's context always remains one hop ahead. From experimental and simulation results, we find that the use of neighbor graphs reduces the layer 2 handoff latency due to reassociation by an order of magnitude from 15.37ms to 1.69ms, and that the effectiveness of the approach improves dramatically as user mobility increases.

322 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A novel data structure, the neighbor graph, that dynamically captures the mobility topology of a wireless network is introduced and it is shown how neighbor graphs can be utilized to obtain a 99 percent reduction in the authentication time of an IEEE 802.11 handoff.
Abstract: User mobility in wireless data networks is increasing because of technological advances, and the desire for voice and multimedia applications. These applications, however, require that handoffs between base stations (or access points) be fast to maintain the quality of the connections. In this article we introduce a novel data structure, the neighbor graph, that dynamically captures the mobility topology of a wireless network. We show how neighbor graphs can be utilized to obtain a 99 percent reduction in the authentication time of an IEEE 802.11 handoff (full EAP-TLS) by proactively distributing necessary key material one hop ahead of the mobile user. We also present a reactive method for fast authentication that requires only firmware changes to access points and hence can easily be deployed on existing wireless networks.

255 citations


Cited by
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01 Apr 1997
TL;DR: The objective of this paper is to give a comprehensive introduction to applied cryptography with an engineer or computer scientist in mind on the knowledge needed to create practical systems which supports integrity, confidentiality, or authenticity.
Abstract: The objective of this paper is to give a comprehensive introduction to applied cryptography with an engineer or computer scientist in mind. The emphasis is on the knowledge needed to create practical systems which supports integrity, confidentiality, or authenticity. Topics covered includes an introduction to the concepts in cryptography, attacks against cryptographic systems, key use and handling, random bit generation, encryption modes, and message authentication codes. Recommendations on algorithms and further reading is given in the end of the paper. This paper should make the reader able to build, understand and evaluate system descriptions and designs based on the cryptographic components described in the paper.

2,188 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A survey of existing solutions and standards is carried out, and design guidelines in architectures and protocols for mmWave communications are proposed, to facilitate the deployment of mmWave communication systems in the future 5G networks.
Abstract: With the explosive growth of mobile data demand, the fifth generation (5G) mobile network would exploit the enormous amount of spectrum in the millimeter wave (mmWave) bands to greatly increase communication capacity. There are fundamental differences between mmWave communications and existing other communication systems, in terms of high propagation loss, directivity, and sensitivity to blockage. These characteristics of mmWave communications pose several challenges to fully exploit the potential of mmWave communications, including integrated circuits and system design, interference management, spatial reuse, anti-blockage, and dynamics control. To address these challenges, we carry out a survey of existing solutions and standards, and propose design guidelines in architectures and protocols for mmWave communications. We also discuss the potential applications of mmWave communications in the 5G network, including the small cell access, the cellular access, and the wireless backhaul. Finally, we discuss relevant open research issues including the new physical layer technology, software-defined network architecture, measurements of network state information, efficient control mechanisms, and heterogeneous networking, which should be further investigated to facilitate the deployment of mmWave communication systems in the future 5G networks.

1,041 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 2003
TL;DR: This paper presents an empirical study of this handoff process at the link layer, with a detailed breakup of the latency into various components, showing that a MAC layer function - probe is the primary contributor to the overall handoff latency.
Abstract: IEEE 802.11 based wireless networks have seen rapid growth and deployment in the recent years. Critical to the 802.11 MAC operation, is the handoff function which occurs when a mobile node moves its association from one access point to another. In this paper, we present an empirical study of this handoff process at the link layer, with a detailed breakup of the latency into various components. In particular, we show that a MAC layer function - probe is the primary contributor to the overall handoff latency. In our study, we observe that the latency is significant enough to affect the quality of service for many applications (or network connections). Further we find variations in the latency from one hand-off to another as well as with APs and STAs used from different vendors. Finally, we discuss optimizations on the probe phase which can potentially reduce the probe latency by as much as 98% (and a minimum of 12% in our experiments). Based on the study, we draw some guidelines for future handoff schemes.

954 citations