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Mona Domosh

Bio: Mona Domosh is an academic researcher from Dartmouth College. The author has contributed to research in topics: Cultural geography & Human geography. The author has an hindex of 25, co-authored 71 publications receiving 3296 citations. Previous affiliations of Mona Domosh include San Diego State University & University of Nebraska–Lincoln.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: Warner's Publics and Counterpublics as discussed by the authors explores the relationship between publics and counter-publics in the same way that Negri and Foucault did with constituent power.
Abstract: verse, but above all sovereign in the sense that they are self-made. Warner reads counterpublics in a similar way, but they offer different aspirations than publics. Warner warns us (p. 15) that the chapters might appear to be methodologically incoherent, but this is not necessarily the case. The aforementioned chapters lay the foundations for the rest of the book. For example, the chapter “Sex in Public” (written with Lauren Berlant), which offers a fascinating critique of the heteronormativity of the intimate public sphere, is an excellent elaboration and supplementation of the first two chapters. The intimate (private) sphere is revealed not only as being public but also as being heteronormative (p. 188). Warner explains publics and counterpublics in the same way that Michel Foucault elaborated on the notion of power and Antonio Negri lately explains constituent power. Foucault talked about the productive and multidimensional character of power. In his analysis of the concept of constituent power, Negri intimates to the potentiality of this concept to undo the notion of sovereign power (as state-owned power). Warner’s Publics and Counterpublics similarly offers a reading of publics and counterpublics as being multidimensional, self-making, dynamic, and bereft of sovereign power (as power owned by states). Such a study of publics and counterpublics opens up the possibility of understanding how modernity and late modernity became or are becoming organised, politicised, and even legitimised. In this respect, the book supplements the projects of Foucault and Negri and is exciting, refreshing, and welcomed. For example, readers might find fascinating and entertaining his readings of the early 19th-century New York African Theatre and Whitman. Publics and Counterpublics will be of interest to a variety of disciplines and programs, but in particular it will benefit politics, critical legal theory, queer, race, and feminist studies and literary theory.

263 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine how women have contributed to the formation of geographic knowledge, and, by implication, ask what can be learned by considering the contribution of women's ways of knowing to our reconstruction of human geography.
Abstract: Recent attempts to contextualize the history of geography have ignored the gendered construction of much of that history, while arguments for a post-modern human geography have ignored feminist theory. By examining the stories of Victorian women explorers, this essay suggests how women have contributed to the formation of geographic knowledge, and, by implication, asks what can be learned by considering the contribution of women's ways of knowing to our reconstruction of human geography.

179 citations

Book
18 Nov 2002
TL;DR: The Handbook of Cultural Geography as discussed by the authors presents a "state of the art" assessment of the key questions informing cultural geography in the 21st century, emphasizing the intellectual diversity of the discipline and looking at resonances between cultural geography and other disciplines.
Abstract: The Handbook of Cultural Geography presents a 'state of the art' assessment of the key questions informing cultural geography in the 21st century. Emphasising the intellectual diversity of the discipline, the Handbook presents a comprehensive statement of the relationship between the cultural imagination and the geographical imagination while also looking at resonances between cultural geography and other disciplines. The work is cross-referenced throughout and presents a completely integrated overview of cultural geography. This will be an essential reference for any inquiry into how culture is spatially constituted and, equally, how geography is culturally constructed.

179 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

160 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: Familiarity, ease of access, trust, and awareness of risks, will all be important for the future.
Abstract: 萨义德以其独特的双重身份,对西方中心权力话语做了分析,通过对文学作品、演讲演说等文本的解读,将O rie n ta lis m——"东方学",做了三重释义:一门学科、一种思维方式和一种权力话语系统,对东方学权力话语做了系统的批判,同时将东方学放入空间维度对东方学文本做了细致的解读。

3,845 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors address the discussion, particularly prominent among feminist geographers, of reflexivity as a strategy for marking geographical knowledges as situated and argue that, if the aim of...
Abstract: This article addresses the discussion, particularly prominent among feminist geographers, of reflexivity as a strategy for marking geographical knowledges as situated. It argues that, if the aim of...

2,100 citations

Journal Article
Aaron Pollack1
TL;DR: This article argued that the British Empire was a " liberal" empire that upheld international law, kept the seas open and free, and ultimately benefited everyone by ensuring the free flow of trade.
Abstract: From a world history perspective, the most noticeable trend in the history of the late 19th century was the domination of Europeans over Non­Europeans. This domination took many forms ranging from economic penetration to outright annexation. No area of the globe, however remote from Europe, was free of European merchants, adventurers, explorers or western missionaries. Was colonialism good for either the imperialist or the peoples of the globe who found themselves subjects of one empire or another? A few decades ago, the answer would have been a resounding no. Now, in the wake of the collapse of the Soviet Union, the more or less widespread discrediting of Marxist and Leninist analysis, and the end of the Cold War, political scientists and historians seem willing to take a more positive look at Nineteenth Century Imperialism. One noted current historian, Niall Ferguson has argued that the British Empire probably accomplished more positive good for the world than the last generation of historians, poisoned by Marxism, could or would concede. Ferguson has argued that the British Empire was a \" liberal \" empire that upheld international law, kept the seas open and free, and ultimately benefited everyone by ensuring the free flow of trade. In other words, Ferguson would find little reason to contradict the young Winston Churchill's assertion that the aim of British imperialism was to: give peace to warring tribes, to administer justice where all was violence, to strike the chains off the slave, to draw the richness from the soil, to place the earliest seeds of commerce and learning, to increase in whole peoples their capacities for pleasure and diminish their chances of pain. It should come as no surprise that Ferguson regards the United States current position in the world as the natural successor to the British Empire and that the greatest danger the U.S. represents is that the world will not get enough American Imperialism because U.S. leaders often have short attention spans and tend to pull back troops when intervention becomes unpopular. It will be very interesting to check back into the debate on Imperialism about ten years from now and see how Niall Ferguson's point of view has fared! The other great school of thought about Imperialism is, of course, Marxist. For example, Marxist historians like E.J. Hobsbawm argue that if we look at the l9th century as a great competition for the world's wealth and …

2,001 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Home is variously described in the literature as conflated with or related to house, family, haven, self, gender, and journeying, and many authors also consider notions of being-at-home, creating or making home and the ideal home as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: In recent years there has been a proliferation of writing on the meaning of home within the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, psychology, human geography, history, architecture and philosophy. Although many researchers now understand home as a multidimensional concept and acknowledge the presence of and need for multidisciplinary research in the field, there has been little sustained reflection and critique of the multidisciplinary field of home research and the diverse, even contradictory meanings of this term. This paper brings together and examines the dominant and recurring ideas about home represented in the relevant theoretical and empirical literature. It raises the question whether or not home is (a) place(s), (a) space(s), feeling(s), practices, and/or an active state of state of being in the world? Home is variously described in the literature as conflated with or related to house, family, haven, self, gender, and journeying. Many authors also consider notions of being-at-home, creating or making home and the ideal home. In an effort to facilitate interdisciplinary conversations about the meaning and experience of home each of these themes are briefly considered in this critical literature review.

1,141 citations