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Monica Black

Bio: Monica Black is an academic researcher from Furman University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Nazism & Nazi Germany. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 7 publications receiving 26 citations.

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Book
10 May 2010
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe the Nazi ways of death in Berlin, ca.1930, and the West's way of death, and conclude that death in everyday life and reckoning are the main causes of death.
Abstract: Introduction 1. Death in Berlin, ca.1930 2. Nazi ways of death 3. Death in everyday life 4. Death and reckoning 5. Death in socialism 6. Death and the West Conclusions.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Monica Black1
TL;DR: For instance, the authors traces shifts in attitudes towards death, practices of burial, and rituals of mourning in West Berlin from the 1948 currency reform to the 1961 construction of the Berlin Wall.
Abstract: This essay traces shifts in attitudes towards death, practices of burial, and rituals of mourning in West Berlin from the 1948 currency reform to the 1961 construction of the Berlin Wall. It shows that West Berliners in the years immediately following the Second World War maintained an arduous devotion to their dead—particularly the war dead. Yet as the war became a less immediate experience over the course of the 1950s, broad cultural shifts took shape, including a renewed sense of optimism and an emerging feeling that the suffering associated with the war could be and was being redeemed. Meanwhile, a cult of the dead long venerated as part of the very foundation of German culture gradually became ‘less German’ and ‘more Western’ over that same period. In this way, it also became a means of distinguishing West Berlin from its Communist neighbour to the East. By focusing on shifts in perceptions and practices surrounding death, the essay reveals part of the process by which moral and ethical values were reconstructed after Nazism, and how the racist collectivism of the Third Reich gradually gave way to the broadly individualist, democratic-socialist humanism that would form the basis of an expressly West German politics and society.

4 citations

01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: In the 1950s, West Germany was positively deluged with other wonders: mysterious healings, mystical visions, rumors of the end of the world, and stories of divine and devilish interventions in ordinary lives.
Abstract: In THE 1950S, In THE MIDST OF WHAT CAME to be known as the Economic Miracle, West Germany was positively deluged with other wonders: mysterious healings, mystical visions, rumors of the end of the world, and stories of divine and devilish interventions in ordinary lives. Scores of citizens of the Federal Republic (as well as Swiss, Austrians, and others from neighboring countries) set off on pilgrimages to see the virgin Mary, Jesus, and hosts of angels, after they began appearing to a group of children in the southern German village of Heroldsbach in late 1949.1 Hundreds of thousands more journeyed from one end of the Republic to the other in the hopes of meeting a wildly popular faith healer, Bruno Groning, who, some said, healed illness by banishing demons. Still others availed themselves of the skills of local exorcists in an effort to remove evil spirits from their bodies and minds. There also appears to have been an

2 citations

Book ChapterDOI
23 Apr 2015

1 citations


Cited by
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Book
14 May 2015
TL;DR: Follmer as mentioned in this paper traces the history of individuality in Berlin from the late 1920s to the construction of the Berlin Wall in August 1961, and proposes a fresh perspective on twentieth-century Berlin that will engage readers with an interest in the German metropolis as well as European urban history more broadly.
Abstract: Moritz Follmer traces the history of individuality in Berlin from the late 1920s to the construction of the Berlin Wall in August 1961. The demand to be recognised as an individual was central to metropolitan society, as were the spectres of risk, isolation and loss of agency. This was true under all five regimes of the period, through economic depression, war, occupation and reconstruction. The quest for individuality could put democracy under pressure, as in the Weimar years, and could be satisfied by a dictatorship, as was the case in the Third Reich. It was only in the course of the 1950s, when liberal democracy was able to offer superior opportunities for consumerism, that individuality finally claimed the mantle. Individuality and Modernity in Berlin proposes a fresh perspective on twentieth-century Berlin that will engage readers with an interest in the German metropolis as well as European urban history more broadly.

33 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: Norton et al. as discussed by the authors examined what happens to migrant bodies after they die and showed that the governance of the dead is intimately linked to the construction of the nation and the enactment of sovereignty, and that decisions about where and how to be buried are linked to larger political struggles over the meaning of home and homeland.
Abstract: This dissertation examines what happens to migrant bodies after they die. It demonstrates that the governance of the dead is intimately linked to the construction of the nation and the enactment of sovereignty. Through a comparative study of the mortuary practices of ethno-religious minorities in Germany, it highlights the ways that death structures political membership and identity. By tracing the actors, networks, and institutions that determine the movement of dead bodies within and across international borders, it analyzes how relations between authority, territory, and populations are managed at a transnational level. The dissertation builds on extensive, multi-sited fieldwork conducted in Berlin and Istanbul in 2013-15. Drawing on interviews and participant observation with bereaved families, Muslim undertakers, government officials, religious leaders, and representatives of funeral aid societies, I show how the corpse functions as a political object by structuring claims about citizenship, belonging, and collective identity. I argue that families, religious communities, and states all have a vested interest in the fate of dead bodies. Further, I demonstrate that in contexts where the boundaries of the nation and its demos are contested, burial decisions are political decisions. Focusing primarily on Turkish and Kurdish communities, I show how decisions about where and how to be buried are linked to larger political struggles over the meaning of home and homeland. While burial in Germany offers a symbolically powerful means for migrants and their children to assert political membership and foster a sense of belonging, the widespread practice of posthumous repatriation illustrates the continued importance of transnational ties and serves as an indictment of an exclusionary socio-political order. In both situations, the corpse is central to localizing and grounding political claims for recognition and inclusion. As I show, this is a highly contentious process wherein different factions, including states and civil society organizations, struggle over where dead bodies should go and what they should signify. In highlighting the role that burial decisions play in the negotiation of social, cultural, and political boundaries, this dissertation contributes to a growing body of literature on how the long-term settlement of Muslim immigrants is transforming European societies. Degree Type Dissertation Degree Name Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Graduate Group Political Science First Advisor Anne Norton

32 citations