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Monique Mitchell Turner

Bio: Monique Mitchell Turner is an academic researcher from Michigan State University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Anger & Persuasion. The author has an hindex of 19, co-authored 64 publications receiving 1503 citations. Previous affiliations of Monique Mitchell Turner include Milken Institute & University of Maryland, College Park.
Topics: Anger, Persuasion, Medicine, Population, Reactance


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors reported two experiments that were conducted to test and extend the work of J. P. Dillard and L. Shen (2005) examining the cognitive and affective processes involved in psychological reactance.
Abstract: This manuscript reports 2 experiments that were conducted to test and extend the work of J. P. Dillard and L. Shen (2005) examining the cognitive and affective processes involved in psychological reactance. In particular, the studies reported here (a) examined the best-fitting model of reactance processes and (b) tested 3 factors that may affect reactance including argument quality, severity of the consequences associated with the message topic, and magnitude of the request made in the message. The results showed that the intertwined cognitive‐affective model was the best-fitting model of reactance processes. Magnitude of the request was the only variable that affected reactance. The implications of these findings for research on reactance and persuasive health campaigns are discussed.

258 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the antecedents of information seeking and retention were examined based on individuals risk perception and efficacy beliefs, and the risk perception attitude framework was used to formulate four groups: responsive (high risk high efficacy), avoidance (High risk low efficacy), proactive (low risk high high efficacy) and indifference (low-risk low efficacy).
Abstract: Despite the importance of health information seeking not all people engage in such behaviors especially when thinking about the disease is distressing. The focus of this paper is to examine the antecedents of information seeking and retention. Based on individuals risk perception and efficacy beliefs the risk perception attitude framework is used to formulate four groups: responsive (high risk high efficacy) avoidance (high risk low efficacy) proactive (low risk high efficacy) and indifference (low risk low efficacy). In Study 1 a 2 (risk) x 2 (efficacy) between-subjects experiment participants perceived risk to skin cancer and skin cancer-related efficacy beliefs were induced to determine their information seeking retention and intentions to engage in future seeking. The responsive group as predicted was associated with the most information-seeking behaviors and information-seeking intentions. The avoidance group however sought information but exhibited the lowest retention scores. These results were used to derive two predictions - the incredulity hypothesis and the anxiety-reduction hypothesis - that were then tested in Study 2. Study 2 also a 2 (risk) x 2 (efficacy) between-subjects experiment dealing with diabetes found support for the anxiety-reduction hypothesis which argues that the high-risk low-efficacy group experiences more anxiety which leads to high motivations to seek but lower ability to retain information. (authors)

200 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The data indicated that the average relationship for peer effects on substance use was larger than the effect for parental influence, indicating that both parents and peers influence decisions about substance use.
Abstract: This literature summary, using meta-analysis, compares the influence of parents versus peers on substance use. The data indicated that the average relationship for peer effects on substance use was larger than the effect for parental influence. Several moderating influences (such as youth age and type of substance) are considered. The findings indicate that the relative size of parental and peer influence varies with the age of the adolescent and the type of substance. The results indicate that both parents and peers influence decisions about substance use. Future educational interventions concerning substance use should consider how best to combine these two sources of influence.

177 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present the Anger Activism Model, which uses levels of anger and efficacy to predict differences in behaviors between angry and disinterested groups, and show that strong feelings of anger will not translate into behaviors.

128 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors make a prediction that whether gossip acts as relational ruin or social glue depends on the valence of the gossip and the type of relationship among the communicators.
Abstract: Although scholars have discussed the occurrence of gossip in social situations, gossip's function as a social influence tool has received little theoretical attention. Of particular interest is the issue of whether gossip is untrustworthy, leading to relational demise, or whether gossip can lead to perceived liking, trust, and expertise. The prediction was made that whether gossip acts as relational ruin or social glue depends on the valence of the gossip and the type of relationship among the communicators. It was proposed that source cue perceptions will be the function of an interaction between relationship type and gossip valence. Specifically, friends' judgments will not be affected by gossip valence, but strangers' assessments of liking, trust, and expertise will increase when gossip is positive and will decrease when gossip is negative (when controlling for propensity to gossip). An experiment was designed to test these predictions. The data indicated that both positive and negative gossip are perc...

80 citations


Cited by
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3,628 citations

Book
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: This chapter discusses the construction of Inquiry, the science of inquiry, and the role of data in the design of research.
Abstract: Part I: AN INTRODUCTION TO INQUIRY. 1. Human Inquiry and Science. 2. Paradigms, Theory, and Research. 3. The Ethics and Politics of Social Research. Part II: THE STRUCTURING OF INQUIRY: QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE. 4. Research Design. 5. Conceptualization, Operationalization, and Measurement. 6. Indexes, Scales, and Typologies. 7. The Logic of Sampling. Part III: MODES OF OBSERVATION: QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE. 8. Experiments. 9. Survey Research. 10. Qualitative Field Research. 11. Unobtrusive Research. 12. Evaluation Research. Part IV: ANALYSIS OF DATA:QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE . 13. Qualitative Data Analysis. 14. Quantitative Data Analysis. 15. Reading and Writing Social Research. Appendix A. Using the Library. Appendix B. Random Numbers. Appendix C. Distribution of Chi Square. Appendix D. Normal Curve Areas. Appendix E. Estimated Sampling Error.

2,884 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: This experimental and quasi experimental designs for research aims to help people to cope with some infectious virus inside their laptop, rather than reading a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon, but end up in malicious downloads.
Abstract: Thank you for reading experimental and quasi experimental designs for research. Maybe you have knowledge that, people have search numerous times for their favorite readings like this experimental and quasi experimental designs for research, but end up in malicious downloads. Rather than reading a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon, instead they cope with some infectious virus inside their laptop.

2,255 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The applied missing data analysis is universally compatible with any devices to read and is available in the digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly.
Abstract: Thank you for downloading applied missing data analysis. Maybe you have knowledge that, people have look hundreds times for their favorite readings like this applied missing data analysis, but end up in infectious downloads. Rather than enjoying a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon, instead they juggled with some malicious bugs inside their laptop. applied missing data analysis is available in our digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly. Our digital library hosts in multiple locations, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one. Merely said, the applied missing data analysis is universally compatible with any devices to read.

1,924 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There are two kinds of tutorial articles: those that provide a primer on an established topic and those that let us in on the ground floor of something of emerging importance.
Abstract: There are two kinds of tutorial articles: those that provide a primer on an established topic and those that let us in on the ground floor of something of emerging importance. The first type of tutorial can have a noted expert who has been gracious (and brave) enough to write a field guide about a particular topic. The other sort of tutorial typically involves researchers who have each been laboring on a topic for some years. Both sorts of tutorial articles are very much desired. But we, as an editorial board for both Systems and Transactions, know that there has been no logical place for them in the AESS until this series was started several years ago. With these tutorials, we hope to continue to give them a home, a welcome, and provide a service to our membership. We do not intend to publish tutorials on a regular basis, but we hope to deliver them once or twice per year. We need and welcome good, useful tutorial articles (both kinds) in relevant AESS areas. If you, the reader, can offer a topic of interest and an author to write about it, please contact us. Self-nominations are welcome, and even more ideal is a suggestion of an article that the editor(s) can solicit. All articles will be reviewed in detail. Criteria on which they will be judged include their clarity of presentation, relevance, and likely audience, and, of course, their correctness and scientific merit. As to the mathematical level, the articles in this issue are a good guide: in each case the author has striven to explain complicated topics in simple-well, tutorial-terms. There should be no (or very little) novel material: the home for archival science is the Transactions Magazine, and submissions that need to be properly peer reviewed would be rerouted there. Likewise, articles that are interesting and descriptive, but lack significant tutorial content, ought more properly be submitted to the Systems Magazine.

955 citations